1654 The Barony of Dundalk

in

The Down Survey

 

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1654 The Down Survey - Barony of Dundalk

THE COUNTY OF LOUTH ON THE DOWN SURVEY

(R.C. Simington, Dublin)

 

The distribution of the estates forfeited in consequence of the Rebellion of 1641, was primarily based on the Act passed in the English Parliament in the 17th year of Charles I. (1642). The occasion of the Act was the want of money by the English Parliament for the purpose of carrying out its military operations in the suppression of the Rebellion. It proceeded to raise this money, by way of loan, by offering two and a half million acres of the forfeited land as security: - Each person who adventured £200 to receive one thousand acres in Ulster; for £300, one thousand acres in Connaught; for £450, one thousand acres in Munster; and for £600, one thousand acres in Leinster. The Act further declared that the rights, titles, or interests which the rebels had in the land of Ireland on the 23rd October, 1641, were forfeited and deemed the actual and real possession of the King.

 

When the rebellion was subdued in 1652 the Commonwealth Parliament was presented with a huge list of arrears of pay due to the army. And so another Act was passed on the 27th of September, 1653, which provided for the satisfaction of this debt also, out of the forfeited estates. This debt, as a matter of fact, was mounting up to an enormous extent, and it was decided to pay the soldiers back in land – this to be done prior to the settlement of adventurers' claims.

 

The scheme under which the distribution of the land was to take place was another subject of the Act. Commissioners were appointed for the purpose of carrying out its direction. They were to have a survey made of the forfeited lands, and to appoint a court for receiving and hearing claims.

 

Of the earlier surveys made under this Act the Civil Survey was the more important. Its purpose was the discovery and description of the forfeited lands. From these discoveries and descriptions comprising the Civil Survey, lists were made, and these subsequently supplied the surveyors who admeasured and mapped the lands. This admeasurement and mapping is known as the Down Survey.

 

The survey of what might be called the military counties was placed in the hands of Doctor William Petty. Petty came to Ireland as a physician to the Parliamentarian army. He was not only a physician but a great mathematician, and he undertook the work on the discovery of inaccuracies in a previous geometrical survey. In his agreement (dated 11th December, 1655) with Benjamin Worsley, the General Surveyor, on behalf of the Commonwealth, Petty contracted to protract and lay down the several parcels of land, with their qualities, areas, metes, and bounds, in baronies, and to return perfect and exact maps for public use of each barony and county. This survey was completed in about thirteen months, and the distribution of the lands to the officers and soldiers was completed about the autumn of 1656.

 

A similar course was adopted as regards the satisfaction of the adventurers, except that the survey of lands to be set out to them was not entrusted to Petty alone. Dissatisfaction with Petty's work had been expressed by the military claimants, and a joint survey was directed to be made by Benjamin Worsley and William Petty.

 

This dual appointment of Benjamin Worsley and Doctor Petty to survey the residue of the forfeited lands explained very largely the reason this survey was called the Down Survey, and not, as might be imagined, Petty's survey, or Petty and Worsley's survey.

 

Doctor Petty, it has been seen, was contractor only for the officers' and soldiers' portion, while the adventurers' part was under joint management. A name, therefore, common to both surveys was taken which, at the same time, expressed the method of the survey, namely, "laying down" from the field books on paper the measurement of the lands in area and form. From the expressions "laying down" the Down Survey took its title, which was perhaps, all things considered, the most appropriate and expedient. Moreover it not only described the survey itself but distinguished it from the earlier estimate surveys which were made by inquisition and not by chain and scale.

 

Abstracts from the Civil and Down Surveys were then made, divided into counties and bound up in large volumes. These volumes were called Distribution Books, and from them the list of forfeiture (to follow) in the County of Louth is taken. In the first column the names of the persons who were the owners of the land in 1641, and who forfeited, are given; the second, the land in their possession; in the third, the names of the adventurers, officers, soldiers, Innocent Papists, and others whose services were rewarded by grants of land; and in the fourth, the acreage of the land granted.

 

The appearance of the same person in many cases, in the first and third columns, is explained by their having taken out either a Decree of Innocence or by their holding mortgages or charges on the land. The patents granting the lands to the new owners were made subject to these charges.

 

Those who claimed their innocence of having taken any part in the rebellion appeared before the Court of Claims, proved their innocence, and produced witnesses and documents to show their title to the lands they occupied. If the court was satisfied it made a Decree confirming the title of the claimants as it existed before the breaking out of the rebellion.

 

It will be remembered that under an Ordinance of 1652, all persons of the Catholic Religion who had not manifested their constant good affection to the Commonwealth were forfeit one-third of their estates, and to be assigned lands to the value of the other two-thirds where the Commonwealth should appoint. Acting under the Ordinance of 1653 already referred to, Commissioners held Courts at Athlone to determine the qualifications of the Catholics, and made their Decrees accordingly. At Loughrea another set of Commissioners set out the transplantation in Connaught and Clare on the basis of these Decrees.

 

In conclusion, it may be stated that the soldiers and adventurers were confirmed in their estates by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation of which the Down Survey was the basis. These Acts, together with the "resolution of the doubts by the Lord Lieutenant and Council upon the Act of Settlement and Explanation" formed the code under which the restoration settlement was carried to a conclusion.

                                                                                                    CHRISTOPHER BARRES

    [Map of County Lowth by Sir William Petty, dated 1685]

 

 

BARONY OF DUNDALK

 

Parish of Dundalk

Proprietors in 1641 by the Civill Survey

Denominacons of Land by the Down Survey

Persons to whom Disposed to on the Acts

Acres Granted IPM

Severall Propriets and small parcels

Many Forfeited lands under severall propriets

The Towne and Lands of Dundalke

The Tenants and Towne of Dundalke

Lord Dungannon

Thomas Caskell

Pat Lenan

Sir Robert Reynolds

Anne Dowdall

1200

60

30

809

56

Part of ye Comons

Of ye same Towne

Lod. Of Slaine

73

The Great Bogg

Of Dundalke

Hen. Draycott

127

Another Bogg

Of ye same

 

 

Another parcel of Mr. Hammon, Prot.

Comons of ye same

2 pcalls in ye same 27 acres Lisbalregan

 

John Exham

 

81

Sr. Christr Bellew

Castletowne Bellew

Sr. Jon Bellew

708

John White I.P.

Balregan

Sr. Robt Reynolds

Lord Dungannon

194

57

Sir Christr Bellew

Tankards Rock

Sr. John Bellew

152

John Draycott of Mornanstowne

Rath

-

 

Alexander Mayne

Littlemill

Duke of Yorke

59

Law. Dowdall of Athlumney and James Talbott of Corstowne

Great Haggardstowne

Wm Talbott

Jane Dowdall

Duke of Yorke

Sr Jon Bellew

290

290

Sir Christr Bellew

Little Haggardstowne

Sr. Jon Bellew

1261

 

Parish of Ballebarlick

Garrt Talbott of Corrtowne

Ballebarlick

Lad An Dowdall

Wm Talbott

95

95

Lawrence Dowdall of Athlumney

Killally

Wm Talbott

Lad Anne Dowdall

Ld Massereene

37

37

 

Newtowne

Ld Massereene

Wm Talbott

Lad Anne Dowdall

37

55

55

Patk Gernon I.P.

In Gibbonstowne, called Carnabrady

-

 

Thomas Bolton, of Grange, Prot

In ye same called Babesland

John Babe

60

 

Parish of Hyanstowne

Ld. Of Lowth I.P.

Haynstowne

Gerd Aylmer

Math Plunkett

480

The same and Christr Bellew

Reynoldstowne

Math Plunkett

Gerd Aylmer

Sir Jon Bellew

Math Plunkett

73

73

Pat Gernon

Dunmoghlan, psst

Wm Shaw

380

 

Parish of Dunbin

Pat Gernon, Hen Gernon and Sr Richd Bellew

Dunbin

Nichl Gernon

Ld Massereene

Sr Jno Bellew

129

222

10

Sir Christr Bellew

Donaghmore

Sr Jno Bellew

319

Alexr Mapus

Thomastowne

Duke of Yorke

77

Sr Christr Bellew

Kilkerly

Sr Jno Bellew

282

William Gough

Knockgorr

William Gough

80

 

Parish of Lowth

Patrick Bellew, of Verdonstowne

Rahedy

Duke of Yorke

110

John Taaffe of Bragganstowne

Steevenstowne

Ballaclare

Samll Byfield

Christr Taaffe

Roger Gregory

506

13

Lord of Lowth, Henry Gernon and Barnwell of Lisfoyle

Part of Gilbertstowne, called Priorland

Roger Gregory

Gerg Aylmer

Math Plunket

12

54

Thos Plunket, Prot

Ros—ca and part of Gibbstowne

Math Plunket

920

 

Parish of Barronstowne

Patrick Bellew, of Verdonstowne

Barronstowne

Conegarr

Verdenstowne

Maughreagh

Begnett Barr

Duke of Yorke

Elias Shee

Duke of Yorke

194

165

613

217

Sir Christr Bellew

Phillipstowne

Carrickstucke

Sr Jno Bellew

222

111

Patrick Bellew

Rathmore

Duke of Yorke

135

 

Parish of Faugher

John White of Balregan

Lurgankill

Carrickedmund

Ballynamoney

Sr Robert Reynolds

Sr Robert Reynolds

334

311

98

Lord Moore, Prot.

Kilcurry

 

 

John White afsd

Annaghs

 

 

 

Parish of Ballymascanlan

Oliver Cashell of Dundalk, I.P.

Ballyboybegg

Duke of Yorke

152

Christr White of Maddoxtowne, I.P.

Ballyboybegg

 

280

 

Parish of Roche

Sr Christr Bellew of Castletowne

Dockavan

Edencall

Taaffebane

Cavan Reny

Freat Falmore

Clogher

Drumbilly

Little Falmore

Caine

Killyne

 

 

 

 

Sr John Bellew

92

119

190

266

192

279

285

97

284

101

E. of Kildare, Prot.

The same

Ballevinby

Dromgoole

 

 

 

Parish of Iniskine

Ballyfenan called by those ensuing names:-

 

 

 

Sr Christr Bellew

Tatenskeagh

Lisdromsonnett

Tapparan

Kilconner

Mullaghfunshinagh

Gortine

Corcullin

Corloghan

 

 

 

Sr Jno Bellew

81

42

72

67

79

86

70

82

The five Townes of Fewes (vitz) -

 

 

 

 

Sr Christr Bellew

Cavanmore

Taughramore

Cavan Drumkin

Carnahuly

Solagagh

Enaghvany

Clantenay

Shanmullagh

Trey

Dartrim, als Rossoonmre

 

 

 

 

Sr Jno Bellew

112

94

83

118

137

161

145

203

82

83

 

Parish of Carlingford

 

 

 

 

Stephen Dowdall, of Castlecooly

Castlecooly, als Cooley

Ratcurr

Johnstonne

Whitestowne

Mullaghatney

5 acres called Dowdall’s Land

Carpetas, and Madoxland

 

 

 

Duke of Yorke

604

161

90

165

70

59

Patr Merriman

Carlingford, with its

 

600

Patrick White

Hamletts, vitz

 

 

Pat Sedgrave

Leminreagh

Ld Dungannon,

 

Patr Cashell

Upper Mullaghtee, and

Math Plunkett

 

 

Randallsland

 

 

The same

The Towne, Tenants and Commons of Carlingford

 

 

Patrick Sedgrave, of Grange

Castlecurragh

Lisdaragh

Betaghs Rath and Monkesland

Tullatrim

 

205

55

372

10

Patrick Cashell, of Dundalke

Farrin Altrim and Cartullybeg

Corballis

Pucksland, 12 acres, parts of Corballis

 

Duke of Yorke

10

99

43

Margarett White

Ffaren Studdery

Killeniskey

 

22

99

Patrick Bellew, of Verdonstowne

Balltrasney

Ballymahitch

Ballurgan

 

Elias Shee,

Michael Bellew

Duke of Yorke

37

44

12

463

Christopr White

Ballugge

Kathn Dowdall

Math Dowdall

Duke of Yorke

Ld of Slane

 

410

75

Lord of Lowth

Ballmamacherry

Artullimore

Ffarrantanly and Creecan

 

 

Mary Plunkett

Templetowne

Maghernacra

Ballynamoney

Mullogh

 

William Legg

259

 

62

The same

Old Grange

 

45

Bagnall, Prot

Lower Mullaghty

Muchgrange

Mullabny and

Ballabun (1057 acres)

Irish Grange (157 acres)

Ballyvorey (105 acres)

Omeath (156 acres)

 

 

 

Abbreviations: I.P. – Irish Papist;  Ld. – Lord; Papt. - Papist;  Prot. – Protestant; Sr. – Sir;  B. – Bishop; E. – Earl; C. – Church

This barony was the inheritance, prior to the Anglo-Norman invasion, of the O’Scanlon and O’Coleman chiefs. After the Anglo-Norman settlement it formed the estates of the Taaffes, De Gernons, De Verdons and Dromgooles.

 

In following the forfeitures made in 1641, the reader may meet along the way many of his ancestors, with what feeling he, alone, can tell. ‘We wish to discover out ancestors’, says Gibbon, ‘but we wish to discover them possessed of ample fortunes, adorned with honourable titles and holding an eminent rank in the class of hereditary nobles, which has been maintained for the wisest and most beneficial purposes in almost every modification of political society.’ Those who seek their ancestors in the research of the Down Survey prior to the coming of the Cromwellians, will find many whose inheritance entitled them to own eminent rank amongst the nobles of Louth. But Cromwell had no respect for rank and he swept them away to Connaught in order to make room for his own followers and favourites. And yet the very families so dispossessed were the descendants of the Anglo-Norman settlers who had, with the help of John de Courcy dispossessed the old Irish chiefs and clans of Uriel, as Louth was known prior to being formed into an English county by King John in A.D. 1210. The history of Louth was repeating itself: its new owners were on the threshold of empty homes and deserted hearths, and the land was silent as the grave.

 

The Dundalk Democrat,  25 September 1915

 

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