THE GENEALOGY OF GAIRBHITH MAC MAELEITIGH (DIED 935 A.D.)

 

KING OF THE FIR ROIS

 

 

 

 

 

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The following genealogy, using the ancient Irish genealogies as sources, traces the ancestry of Gairbhith, King of the Fir Rois, through some 101 generations, back to the time of Adam.

 

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CRÍCH ROIS, THE LAND OF THE FIR ROIS

 

 

The Crích Rois, the territory of the Fir Rois, lay mostly in mid-Louth but extended into parts of Counties Monaghan and Meath, taking in (approximately) the parishes of Dromin, Kildemock and Smarmore in Co. Louth, Siddan (or Killary), Loughbrackan, Dromcondra and possibly Ardagh, in County Meath and (possibly) the parishes of Magheracloone, Killanny and Magheross in County Monaghan. By the time of the Norman invasion the lands outside County Louth had been lost and the territory consisted of what is now the Barony of Ardee.

 

Source: Rev. Diarmuid Mac Iomhair, ‘The History of Fir Rois’, JCLAHS 1964 pps. 321-348.

 

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THE ANCESTRY OF MILES OF SPAIN (MÍL EASPÁNINNE)

 

to Adam, Son of The Living God

 

MÍL ESPÁINNE (Míl of Spain), king of Spain, s. Bile, king of Spain, s. Breóghan, king of Spain, s. Bráth s. Deaáth, a prince in Getulia, s. Earchadh, prince in Getulia, s. Allód, prince of Getulia s. Nuadha s. Naonual s. Féibhrí Glas s. Aghnón Fionn s. Éibhear Glúinfhionn s. Láimhfhionn s. Adhnomhan s. Tait, king of Scythia, s. Ogmain, king of Scythia, s. Beomhán, king of Scythia, s. Éibhear Scot, the first king of Scythia of the Gaelic people, and he was king from northern Scythia to the shore of the Caspian Sea, s. Srú, prince of Cápa Ciorunt in Egypt, s. Easrú s. Gaoidheal Glas, from whom the Gaoidhil [=Gaels] are descended, s. Néal, the first prince of Cápa Ciorunt, s. Féineas Farsaidh, prince of Scythia, who was known as 'Ríofa Scot,' from whom are derived the Scots and Scoitic, s. Baáth s. Magog s. Japheth, prince of Europe, s. Noah, lord of the world, s. Lamech s. Methuselah s. Enoch s. Jared s. Mahalalel s. Kenan s. Enosh s. Seth s. ADAM, prince of the world, son of The Living God, Lord of All, beyond whom one does not go.

 

Note: “s.” = “son of”

 

Source: Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh, The Great Book of Irish Genealogies, Nollaig Ó Muraíle, Editor, Dublin 2002-03. Vol.1  p.293

 

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THE ANCESTRY OF COLLA DHÁ CHRÍOCH

 

to Míl of Spain

 

COLLA DHÁ CHRÍOCH (aka Colla Fo Chri, aka Muireadhach, floruit 322 A.D.) s. Eochaidh Doimhléan s. Cairbre Lifeachar s. Cormac Ulfhada s. Art Éinfhear s. Conn Céadchathach s. Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar s. Tuathal Teachtmhar s. Fiacha Fionnfholaidh s. Fearadhach Fionn Feachtnach s. Criomhthann Nia Náire s. Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg s. Breas, Nár, and Lothar, the Three Finn of Eamhain, s. Eochaidh Feidhleach s. Fionn s. Fionn-Lugh s. Róighean Ruadh s. Easomhain of Eamhain s. Bláthacht s. Beóthacht s. Labhraidh Lorc s. Éanna Aighneach s. Aonghus Tuirmheach of Teamhair s. Eochaidh Ailtleathan s. Oilill Caisfhiaclach s. Connla Caomh s. Irereo Án s. Meilghe Molbhthach s. Cobhthach Caol Breagh s. Ughaine Mór s. Eochaidh Buadhach s. Daoi Ladhghrach s. Fiacha Tolgrach s. Muireadhach Bolgrach s. Síomon Breac s. Aodhán Glas s. Nuadha Fionn of fál s. Giallchadh s. Oilill Olchaoin s. Síorna Saoghlach s. Dian s. Déamán s. Roitheachtach s. Maon s. Aonghus Olmhucaidh s. Fiacha Labhrainne s. Smiorghall s. Éanbhoth s. Tighearnmhas s. Fódlach s. Eithréal s. Irial Fáidh, or Fáthach, who was [also] named 'Nuadha Airgeadlámh' s. Eireamhon and king of Spain before he came to Ireland along with his elder brother, Éibhear Donn, who has left no descendants, s. MÍL ESPÁINNE

 

Note: “s.” = “son of”

 

Taken mainly from (but with some changes): Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh, The Great Book of Irish Genealogies, Nollaig Ó Muraíle, Editor, Dublin 2002-03. Vol.1  p.293

 

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THE GENEALOGY OF GAIRBHITH MAC MAELEITIGH (DIED 935)

 

KING OF THE FIR ROIS

 

to Colla Dhá Chríoch (floruit 322 AD)

 

 

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THE STORY OF THE THREE COLLAS

The Kingdom of Airghialla is said to have been founded by one of the Three Collas. These brothers make their first appearance in the Annals of the Four Masters in the year 322 AD when they are reported as having ended, by slaying him, the 37-year reign of their uncle, Fiacha Sraibhtine, the King of Tara, at the battle of Dubhchomar[1]. This latter name is that of the druid who foretold Fiacha's death. The Great Book of Irish Genealogies (LGen) says that the Collas were the sons of Eochaidh Doimhléin, the ancestor of the Airghialla, who was killed by Seal Mór at the  same battle. Following the conflict one of the brothers, Colla Uais, took over the kingship of Ireland for four years, until he died (327 AD)[2], after which his cousin Muireadhach Tíreach, the son of the murdered Fiacha Sraibhtine, became king. The two remaining Collas, Colla Dha Chríoch and Colla Meann were banished to Scotland.  On their return to Ireland, they asked that the king should behead them for kin-slaying, whereupon Muireadhach forgave them for the killing of his father. The king later agreed with them that they should wage war against the Ulaidh for the purpose of territorial gain. Then, in league with the tribes of Fermanagh, they were successful in many battles. In the final one, the battle of Achadh Leithghearg, the king of Ulster, Fraechar Foirtriun[3], was slain and Eamhain Mhaca left in ruin (331 AD). The second of the brothers, Colla Meann was killed at this same battle[4]. Out of these many successes against the Ulaidh, the Kingdom of Airghialla was forged.

 

In the genealogical table of any tribe of the Airghialla the Collas are included as it is from them that the various rulers of the Airghialla and the petty-kingdoms within the territory claim descent. The story of the Collas as briefly detailed above has its genesis in the world of Gaelic mythology and should have little place in any serious genealogical study. However, their importance lies in the fact that it was seen as a prerequisite by the various chieftains and kings of the region, in order to exalt their status, to be able to claim descent from the Collas, and through the genealogy of their father Eochaidh Doimléin (son of Cairbre Lifeachair, from whom the Airghialla and the Uí Néill descend), who claimed descent from Adam, the son of the living God[5].

 

 

[1] Most of the following information taken from The Great Book of Irish Genealogies (LGen), Vol. II, pp.3-9.

[2] Here LGen and the Annals of the Four Masters diverge. LGen says that Colla Uais died. The Four Masters says that he was expelled to Scotland, along with his two brothers, by Muirteadhach Tíreach.

[3] 'Fergus Fogha' in LGen.

[4] LGen, Vol. II, p.73.

[5] See Toirdhealbhach Ó Raithbheathaigh, Genealogical Tracts 1, Dublin 1932, p.173.

 

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