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THE RETURNED ARMY

 

County Louth Servicemen in the Great War 1914 -1918

 

 

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ABERNETHY, JAMES, 13598, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force,  Born 6 July 1887 in  Dundalk. Religious affiliation, Church of England. Occupation  Clerk. Next-of-kin, James Abernethy, address indecipherable, father.  Previous military experience, ‘ 1 year CAH’.  Attested  on  23 September 1914 Valcartier, Quebec, Canada.

            1901 Census shows James Abernethy, age 13, living at   house no 3 Ballymascanlan, Co Louth, born Co. Derry, with his father James, age 47, mother Isabella, sister Matilda Isabella, and brother T R Alexander.

No sign of James Jnr on 1911 Census. James Snr. seems to have remarried and living in Co Wicklow.

 

ACHESON, Captain, MALCOLM K, Royal Army Medical Corps, Siege Artillery,. Address: Kilgar, Jocelyn Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Awarded the Military Cross. ‘Temp Capt. Malcolm King Acheson, MD, R.A.M.C. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He tended the wounded under very heavy fire, displaying great courage and determination.  By his devotion and initiative, he was instrumental in saving many lives.’ (Supplement to Edinburgh Gazette, November 16, 1916, p. 2069)

 

No connection between Captain Acheson and Dundalk made, other than the Tempest’s Annual report. He was the son of David and Sarah Acheson, of Drumreany, Castlecaulfield, Co Tyrone. Malcolm Acheson married Dorothy Rennoldson in 1920, and had two sons, Roy Malcolm, who became Professor of Community Medicine at Cambridge,  and Ernest Donald, who became Chief Medical Officer in Britain, and was knighted in1986.  (www.thepeerage.com consulted July 2012)

 

ADAMS, Driver, HARRY, Royal Field Artillery. From Castletown, Dundalk. (TA1916)

1901 Census shows Henry Adams age 4 living at house 16 Farrendreg, Castletown, Dundalk. Father James age 49, occupation general labourer; mother Bridget age 40, and brother James age 7. All Presbyterian. All born Co Louth.  

1911 Census, family living at house 6 Farrendreg.

 

ADAMS, HERBERT, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Roden Place, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1901 census shows Herbert Adams age 14 living at 3 Jocelyn Street, Dundalk, born Dundalk. Father Thomas J, age 44, occupation Secretary of Distillery. Mother Lizzie age 40, and various siblings. All Methodists.

1911 census the family has moved to 2 Roden Place, Dundalk. Herbert is living in house 45.1, Marlboro, Londonderry, as a lodger, occupation Bank Clerk. .

 

 ADAMS, JOSEPH. From Beaulieu, Drogheda. Despatch rider.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census: There is a Joseph Adams, age 28 resident at house 8 Killineer, Drogheda, occupation Chauffeur. Born Newcastle, Co Down. Wife, Annie Adams, age 29, born Dublin. One child, Dorothea Josephine no age, born Co Louth. All Church of Ireland.

 

AGNEW, Gunner, ROBERT , 56 Reserve Battery Royal Field Artillery. From 3 Wynne’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). See Thomas Agnew below

1901 Census Robert Agnew age 12 and Thomas Agnew age 8 lived at 46 Anne Street. Father John, age 37, occupation Cooper, mother Anne age 36, and various siblings. All born Co Louth, all Roman Catholic.

1911 Census family now at 7 Anne Street. Thomas’ occupation is Cooper. Robert married to Bridget, age 22 and living at house 16 Castletown (Acarragh) Dundalk. Occupation Cooper

Possibly 100657 Gunner Robert Agnew, served in France from December 1915 (UK National Archives, Medal Card Index, WO 372/1/28019)

Agnew (Dundalk), Aug 3 1972, at her residence 3 Wynne’s Tce., Brigid, widow of Robert Agnew, very deeply regretted ... Funeral tomorrow (Saturday) at 9.30 from residence to St Patrick’s Cemetery. (Irish Independent, 4  August 1972).

 

AGNEW, Bombardier, THOMAS, 20 Brigade Royal Field Artillery. From 3 Wynne’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). See Robert Agnew.

Possibly 31189, Acting Bombardier, and Gunner, Thomas Agnew, Royal Field Artillery.

served in the Balkans from November 1915. (UK National Archives, Medal Card Index, WO 372/1/28061)

 

AINSWORTH,  WILLIAM, 2204579, Forestry Depot, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Rainier, Washington, USA. Born 15 July 1886 Drumcondry (sic) Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Church of England. Occupation Millwright and Sawyer. Next-of-kin  Mr F A Hoyt, Rainier, Washington, USA, friend.  Attested 7 January,  1918 at Vancouver.  Typed note on attestation papers : ‘Voluntary (sic) enlisted in USA for forestry work’. (Note, Drumcondrath, Co Meath in on the Meath side of the Louth/Meath border)

 

ALDERDICE, A E, Royal Field Artillery. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(Royal Irish Rifles) Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 26 August 1916)

 

ALLEN, JOSEPH, 41728, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born in Dundalk, 28 May 1881. Religious affiliation, Church of England.  Occupation Labourer. Next-of- kin Pat Allen, Dundalk.  Attested  6 January 1916 at Urchfont, Wiltshire, England.  

 

ALLEN, S, Royal Engineers. Son of Mr S Allen, Dublin Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: There is a Samuel Allen, age 16, resident at 9 Dublin Road, Drogheda, occupation Scholar. Irish Church. Born Co Meath.  Father, Samuel Allen, age 43, occupation Commercial Traveller. Born Co Meath. Mother Maria Allen, age 42. Four siblings. Not found on 1911 Census.

 

ALLERDYCE, Trooper, James, South Irish Horse (McDonnell, St. Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

ANDERSON, Brevet Major, B R, DSO, Indian Army (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 Link with Co Louth not known. He was distantly related to Louis John Anderson, see below.

Barton Edward Anderson

Son of Beresford Anderson, born 1833, Chief Engineer Madras Railway, and Dora, daughter of Michael O’Shaughnessy QC. Born 1881, DSO 1916, Lt-Col 59th Royal  Scinde Rifles, which he commanded under the new title 6th Royal Battalion Frontier Force Rifles. Served on the N.W. Frontier Bazaar Valley, and |Mohmand Expedition , 1908 (despatches), Eurpoean War (1914-1918) (despatches three times, Brevet Major, DSO), 3rd Afghan War, 1919, Mesopotamia Army Rebellion, 1920, Waziristan, 1920-1922. (The Andersons of Kilkenny, courtesy of Mike Anderson, Australia)

Morning Post, 2 August 1900, listed as amongst the successful candidates for admission to the Infantry, to the Royal Military College Sandhurst.

Morning Post, 20 August 1900,  B E Anderson listed as in the following report as a ‘candidate’ ... ‘The cadetships offered at the recent examination for the Royal Military College with a view to appointments to the Indian Army have been allotted to the under mentioned candidates ...

Captain B E Anderson 59th Scinde Rifles, appointed Brevet Major, (London Gazette, 18 February 1915, p. 1699)

Brevet Major B E Anderson 59th Scinde Rifles, Staff and Headquarters. Mentioned in  Despatches by Lieut. General P lake, Commanding Indian Expeditionary Force ‘D’, Basrah, 24 August 1916,(3rd Supplement to London Gazette, 19 October , 1916, page 10047.)

Awarded DSO, along with others ‘for distinguished service in the field in Mesopotamia with effect from 3 June 1916 inclusive. (London Gazette, 26 December 1916, p.2410.)

Appointed Major,8 May 1916.  (London Gazette 22 May 1917, p. 4944. )

Retained rank of Major while Deputy Inspector General of Communications in India (Supplement to London Gazette, 4 October, 1920. P. 9677).

Promoted to Lt Colonel 6/13th Frontier Force Rifles (London Gazette, 15 June 1923, p.4210)

Relinquished rank of Lt Colonel (now Brevet Colonel) (London Gazette 5 December 1924)

 

ANDERSON, Surgeon General (Major General) LOUIS JOHN. Born in the house of his maternal Grandfather (George Brunker MD) in Roden Place, Dundalk, 27 March 1861, attended Dundalk (Grammar) School. Son of Louis John Anderson (1836-1867), Wexford District Inspector RIC,  and Frances Ann Brunker (born Roden Place Dundalk , 1839, died Skerries 1911). Extensive Army career, ending as Director of Army Medical Services in Ireland 1912- 1916 and India 1916-1920. (The Andersons of Kilkenny, courtesy of Mike Anderson, Australia).

 

ANONYMOUS 1.

The following is an extract from a letter received by the relatives of a Drogheda man serving in the Canadian Division at the Front, giving an account of how the news of the victory of the Russian Fleet in the Gulf of Riga, was received by the Canadians: - “we were just out of the trenches, when we kept friend Fritz a bit lively, when we heard about the fight in the Baltic. The result was sent up to the trenches and read out by our captain and, of course, we started cheering and passing some remarks about their (the Germans) fighting capabilities. We kept it up so long all down the Canadian front that Fritz opened up with rifles fire along the line, and the fun started properly. Then, between bursts of fire, we sang, or rather yelled “Rule Britannia”, “Sons of the Sea”, etc. Some of our fellows seemed to be pretty well acquainted with the family history of our friends on the other side of “Dead Man’s Land” … We heard about the “royal Edward” being lost. It was rough luck on the poor fellows. … We are all in the best of health and spirits, especially today, as the company has been paid out and are refitting. I have just got some new clothing, and a small bar of Life Buoy soap, so feel quite happy. (Drogheda Independent, September 4, 1915)

           

            (Possibly the same source, as follows)

From the Canadian Front

A Drogheda man writing home, in the course of his letter says: “Our last tour in the front line was an eight day one, and they were days of blazing heat. The second night we were in, the enemy sprung a mine in our immediate left trench. It was a glorious evening, and we were all lying around “spinning yarns” in the evening sun, when we felt the tremor, and the sky drew dark as the clouds of earth and dust went up. The Artillery Observation Officer on duty in the trench sent the SOS to his brigade, and in 40 seconds from the explosion our guns were in action, and the enemy parapets were going skywards in lengths of 25 or 30 yards. Fritz pounded away at the crater for a couple of hours; our guns made earth and sky tremble. The enemy parapets were absolutely levelled along our front. His working parties tried to rebuild the parapets all that night, but they couldn’t face the shrapnel. The wind was n the enemy’s favour, and we were prepared for gas, but he couldn’t use it as his front line on the sector was practically wiped out. Every night during our tour in the trenches he attacked along the front, but he “got it in the neck” at each point. The country round about is very flat and we could see the Huns carrying out their dead and wounded for the next four days. One of the Irish Divisions “playing old Halifax” with them down at Loos.

(Drogheda Independent, 27 May 1916)

 

 ANONYMOUS 2

A Dundalk man who is a non-commissioned officer in the 8th R.D.F., writes us from Buttevant:- “I hope you will excuse the liberty I take in writing to your valued paper, but I thought fir to take the opportunity of letting you know how matters stand here. In the first place, I am glad  to inform you that we, the 48th  Brigade of the 16th Division are under orders to leave here at any moment. We send from the 8th Dublins from Buttevant tomorrow (Friday) morning an advance party of 2 officers, 8 sergeants and corporals and 52 men (to England we expect), but to what part we don’t know. All we do know is it is a move in the right direction; it is not the 48th Brigade alone that are going, but the whole 16th Division. It is a great relief to all the officers, non-commissioned officers and men, to get away from here, and with the help of God to assist their comrades of all other regiments who are fighting with might and main in defence of Ireland and the Empire at large. I believe it is up to and an honour to every Irishman and woman at this present critical time to do all in  their power to defeat Germany – that’s what the Irish Division are out for, and that’s what they intend to do. You know sir, what the 48th Brigade is combined of – the 8th Dublins, 9th Dublins, Munsters and last though not least, the Royal Irish Rifles, regiments who have proved themselves both in France and in the Dardanelles that they know no fear, and with the help of God, the 48th Brigade will maintain the reputation of their heroic comrades, who have given up their lives to maintain the peace of the world. Amongst the 48th Brigade you have plenty of Louth men, gentlemen such as Major Bellingham, whom every man in the 8th Dublins loves, and would give up their lives to follow him everywhere” (Dundalk Democrat, 4 September 1915)

 

ANONYMOUS 3

            6th West Riding Regiment, 30th May 1916

Sir – Would you be so kind as to allow me, an insignificant Irish soldier, to congratulate the men of County Louth through the columns of your widely circulated journal. I wish especially to congratulate the men of the Drogheda Division of the Irish Volunteers in their effort and promptitude in helping to quell the disastrous rebellion in Dublin. Not alone has it been disastrous to life, but in all probability will prove disastrous to the Irish Cause – the Cause which the leaders and people of Ireland have so gallantly fought since the days of Dan O’Connell. How will this rebellion strike Irish units at home and abroad? The one great cry of all the Irish soldiers to-day is, away with the traitor, this traitor to Ireland and the Irish cause. As an Irishman I blush before the world that such a scene should take place in this critical period when we are fighting for our very existence, and the gallant sons of Erin are shedding their life’s blood on the battlefield of France and Belgium for a sacred cause, the love of freedom, faith and pure womanhood.

Is all this to be done in vain? Is the remainder of Ireland going to stand by while a few traitors try to sell the Emerald Isle, the land of faith and parity, for gold dipped in the pure and priceless blood of Irishmen. I ask those who belong to the Sinn Feiners to visit in vision if not in reality the blood stained fields of Flanders and look at what will meet their eye. They will see a devastated country, legs and arms amputated of inoffensive civilians, women and children outraged. May I ask are Irishmen going to stand by while those traitors try to sell their country? But we must fight and we must die till the world is once more free from the yoke of German tyranny. I will conclude with all hearty congratulations to the men of Drogheda Division of the Irish Volunteers

Yours very sincerely

An Irish Soldier.  (Drogheda Independent, 6 May 1915)

 

ARRAN, EARL of, Royal Horse Guards (Blue). From Ravensdale Park, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Arthur Gore, 6th Earl of Arran, (1868 -1958), served in the Boer War and rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Horse Guards during World War 1. He was Justice of the Peace in Hertfordshire, Co Louth and Co Mayo, a Deputy Lieutenant of Co Mayo and Essex and served as Lord Lieutenant of  Donegal 1917 – 1920.

 

ARDEN, SYDNEY FRANK,3310009, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address Box 622, Paris, Ontario, Canada. Born 1 May 1896 in Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Church of Ireland. Occupation Spinner.  Next-of-kin, Rose Arden, Altusville, Ontario, Canada, sister.  Medical examination on 13 October 1917. Drafted on 5 January 1918 at Brantford, Ontario, Canada, .

 

ARTHUR, HENRY, attested twice.

 477017 Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR), Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born Dundalk Co Louth, 8 July 1891. Religious affiliation, Church of England.  Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, mother Maria Arthur, 109 Princes Street, Pedro (?) Terrace, Brisbane, Australia.  Previous military service,  2 years and  252 days in Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery.  Attested 23 August 1915 at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  23 August 1915.

Serial No 9716.  Address  Camp Hill, Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Next-of-kin  Florence Arthur, 138 Young Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, wife. Occupation Soldiering. Previous military experience three years Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery  and 4 years Royal Canadian Regiment. Readmitted to (military) service for treatment of disability caused or aggravated by service, 28 November 1917, at Camp Hill Nova Scotia.

 

ARTHUR, WILLIAM, Australian Contingent. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Serial No. 753a, 31st Infantry Battalion. Born Haggardstown, Dundalk. Enlisted 10 September 1914, age 24. Served in Gallipoli and France. Killed in action in France 27 October, 1916. Not previously recorded in The Unreturned Army.

III. K.17. Australian Imperial Forces Burial Ground, Flers, Somme, France.

 

ATKINSON, Private, JAMES, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castletown Cross, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded September 1916 (Dundalk Democrat, 7 September 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

1911 Census: There is a James Atkinson, age 16 resident at house 17, Castletown, Dundalk, occupation General Labourer. Father, James Atkinson, age 40, occupation General Labourer. Mother, Mary Atkinson, age 35. All Roman Catholic. All born Co Louth. Six siblings.

 

AUSTIN, NOEL A, Canadians.       

(McDonnell, St. Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

Connection with Co Louth not established.

AUSTIN, NOEL ALLINGHAM, 89858, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born Belfast, Co Down, 27 December 1895. Religious affiliation, Church of England. Occupation Bank clerk. Next-of-kin, Mrs H G Austin, 16 Chichester Avenue, Antrim Rd. Belfast, Ireland. Previous military experience, two years Officer Training Corps. Attested on 16 March 1915 at Granby,  Quebec, Canada. ,

1901 Census: Noel Allingham Austin, age 5, lived at house 10, Townparks, Ballymena, Co Antrim. Born Belfast City. Father, Herbert George Austin, age 35, born Dublin City, occupation Rector of Ballymena Parish, Church of Ireland. Mother, Catherine Allingham Austin, age 32, born Co Sligo. One sibling, Barbara, no age.

1911 Census: Apparently Noel Austin now age 15 and boarding at Campbell College, Belmont, Belfast. George and Katherine Austin in a boarding house at 5, Sea View, Warrenpoint, Co Down. Barbara age 10, described as Head of household,  and another child, Herbert Terence, age 9 are at house 6 Townparks, Ballymena, with an aunt and cousin also in residence.

Austin, Noel Allingham – Driver. Born 27 December 1895 at Belfast Ireland. Father, rev Herbert George Austin, Church of Ireland Clergyman. Educated at Campbell College, Belfast. Entered the service of the Bank, 1st April, 1913. Enlisted 16 March,1915, from Granby branch, in 23rd Battery Canadian Field Artillery, with the rank of Driver. Transferred to 2nd Canadian Trench Mortar Group, January, 1916; 1st Canadian Divisional Ammunition Column, May 1916; 23rd Battery July 1916. Principal actions: St Eloi, Sanctuary Wood, Soome.1916; Vimy Ridge, Hill 70. Passchendaele, 1917; Amiens, Arras, Mons 1918. Gun-shot wound in the left forearm, 1st November 1917. Demobilized, 29th May 1919. Subsequent occupation, Entered the employment of Miner Rubber Company 9th June 1919. (Letters from the front, Being a record of the part played by officers of the Bank in the Great War, 1914-1919 (Volume 2) Canadian Bank of Commerce)

Married to Kathleen Yates Austin 1892-1952, Died in 1881. Both are buried in Pinewood Cemetery, Granby, Quebec, Canada. (R Neil Broadhurst and Marilynn Lund Broadhurst, Shefford County Cemeteries, Tombstone Inscriptions from the Protestant Burial Grounds, Volume 2, Ely, Granby, Milltown, Roxton, and Stukely Townships (Canada, 1991)).

 

BACKHOUSE, 2 Lieutenant, WESTON, 22 Battery Royal Field Artillery. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914).

1901 Census,  Weston Backhouse, age four, born Co Louth, son of Henry C Backhouse , Wine Merchant, born Co Louth, and Georgina Backhouse, born Co Leitrim. Living at House 1 Rath, Haggardstown, Co Louth.

1911 Census, family has moved to 14 Ailsbury Road, Dublin, Weston does not appear in the 1911 Irish Census.

Served in France from February 1915.

The engagement is announced of  Mr Henry Weston Backhouse, of 23 Old Buildings, Lincoln’s Inn, elder son of Mr and Mrs H C Backhouse, of 7 7 Lincoln House, Basil Street, Knightsbridge, (Late of Nutley, Ballsbridge, Dublin), and Judith Royce, elder daughter of Lieut.-Colonel J W Royce Tomkin, Little Haugh, Norton, Suffolk. (Freemans Journal, 10 January 1924)

 

BAGNALL, M. Royal Irish Rifles. Joined in Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Possibly 4436 Michael Bagnall, 7 Royal Irish Rifles, 8 John Street, Drogheda. Enlisted 17 March 1915, discharged two months later. File available on ancestry co uk. 

1911 Census, Michael Bagnall age 32, living at 14 John’s Gate, Drogheda, occupation General Labourer. Wife Sara Jane. Three children. All born Co Louth.

 

BANKS, HENRY, Leinster Regiment. From Oulster Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census (possible): Anne Banks, age 58, widow, lived at 16 Oulster Lane, Drogheda. Two sons, Patrick and James, aged 22 and 20;

1911 Census: Family at 6 Oulster Lane, Anne aged 69, three sons, John aged 34, Patrick aged 32 and  James aged 30. All  born Co Louth.

 

BANNON, RICHARD,  2140736, 2 Depot Battalion, British Columbia Regiment. Address  Pavillion Mile, 21, British Columbia, Canada. Born January 1881, Killineer, Drogheda.  Religious affiliation, Catholic. Occupation Farmer. Next-of-kin, Thomas Bannon, Killineer, Drogheda, father.  Failed to register for military draft and was consequently  arrested  on 12 August, 1918. Drafted 15 August 1918, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

1901 Census: Richard Bannon, age 15 lived at 16 Killineer, Drogheda. Occupation Farmer’s servant, in the household of Mary McGinn.

1911 Census: Richard Bannon, age 24 (note age discrepancy with attestation papers), lived at 35 Mell, Drogheda, occupation General Labourer. . Father,  Thomas, age 69, born Co Louth, occupation Labourer. Mother, Annie Bannon. Eleven siblings.

 

BANNON, THOMAS, Royal Field Artillery. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BARKER, Miss, Voluntary Aid Detachment. From Rathduff (Roche), Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

BARNES, JOHN, Royal Scots Fusiliers.

John Barnes was born in Drogheda in 1871 and enlisted into the Royal Scots Fusiliers in August 1889 aged 18. He served at home from 1887-1896, India 1896-1899, South Africa 1899-1900, and home 1900 - 1914, prior to serving with the B.E.F. in France and Flanders from 13 August 1914 to 26 October 1914, when he was returned home suffering with pleurisy. He continued to serve with his regiment at home, subsequently transferring to the Labour Corps and was discharged in 1920 after 33 years continuous service, during which time his name never appeared in the Regimental Conduct Book.

(Dixon Medals website),

 

BARNETT,  ALFRED. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

BARNETT, 1063, ALFRED, Private, H Company, 2 Battalion, 1 Infantry Brigade, Australian Expeditionary Force. Age 29. Born Collon, Co Louth. Next-of-kin, David Barnett, Collon, Co Louth, father.  Occupation Farmhand.  Previous military service, two years in Royal Dublin Fusiliers,  discharged due to ill health.  Enlisted 11 September 1914, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. To Gallipoli 5 April 1915.  Wounded in the eye 28 April 1915. To hospital in Cairo 1 May 1915. Returned to Unit in Gallipoli 2 June 1915. On 7 June 1915 in Gallipoli charged whilst on active service refusing to obey an order. Awarded 5 days Field Punishment No. 2 and forfeit five days pay.  To hospital 6 July 1915 with dysentery.  Invalided to home , Australia, 3 March 1916, for discharge.  Discharged 9 August 1916. Awarded the 1914/15 Medal, British War Medal and Victory Medal. Died 7 December 1944.

1901 Census: Alfred Barnett, age 17, lived at house 19, Church Street, Collon.  Church of Ireland. Occupation  Car Driver. Born Co Louth.  Father, David Barnett, age 52, born Co Cavan, occupation Car Driver. Mother, Ellen Barnett, age 56, born Co Wexford. Occupation Laundress. Three siblings, all born Co Louth.

 

BARRETT, D, worked in Dundalk Post office. See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

 

BARTON,  J, Royal Navy. The three Bartons are sons of Mrs Barton, Trinity Street. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BARTON, Private, LARRY, from Mell, Drogheda. Won the Distinguished Service Medal which was received by his mother from Captain Kensit.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). Lived at 76 George’s Street, Drogheda in house owned by Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust. See BARTON, J.

560 Serjeant C D Jones, 333 Private K McKenna, 10580 Private L Barton, 6374 Private B Leddy, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers. For conspicuous gallantry on 19th October, near Houplines, in volunteering to rescue, under heavy fire, some wounded men, who were lying close to the door of a burning house held by the enemy. They were successful in recovering one wounded man. (Supplement to the London Gazette, 11 November, 1914. P 9231)

 

BARTON, - , MICHAEL, 3 Dragoons. Served all through South African campaign. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). See BARTON, J.

Possibly Michael Barton, Private, 3 Dragoon Guards, GS/5103.  Served in France from 23 November 1914.  Awarded the 1915 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal. (UK National Archives, Medal Index, WO 372/2/271008).

 

BATES, Private, H W, 1 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

BATES, Corporal, HARRY, Grenadier Guards. From Kilcurry, Dundalk.

Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

Corporal Harry Bates, 3rd Batt, Grenadier Guards, is a son of Mr William Bates of Kilcurry, and a grandson of Mr John Taaffe, of Chapel Street, Dundalk, and he joined early in the war. He was gassed in one of the engagements at Ypres in May of 1915 and sent to hospital, but returned to active service, and at Guinchy he had his collar-bone fractured by shrapnel. The senior captain of the company on that occasion was Captain Asquith, the son of the ex-Premier, who it will be remembered was killed in the same action. Cpl Bates has been home on hospital leave during the last week. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 December 1916)

1901 Census: William Henry Bates  age 2, born in England, living at 19 Nicholas Street, Dundalk with various siblings including brothers Patrick Thomas age 4, born ine England,  and Victor age 0, born  Co Louth.. William Bates, father, age 30, born England, occupation General Labourer, and Mary Ann mother, born Dundalk, Co Louth,  age 30.

1911 Census: Harry Bates  age 12, born in Bedfordshire. England, living at House 3, Moorland (Dundalk Rural), with various siblings including brothers Thomas age 14, born in Bedfordshire England,  and Victor age 10, born Dundalk, Co Louth.. William Bates, father, age 40, born Bedfordshire, England, occupation Vanman to tobacco factory, and Mary Ann mother, born Dundalk, Co Louth,  age 41. (See also Bates, Victor)

 

BATES, J P, Grenadier Guards. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

BATES, Private, VICTOR,

            Mrs Bates, Lisdoo Road, has received intimation that her son Victor is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was captured in the Somme battle in March, in which several other Dundalk lads were killed wounded or captured. His brother, Tommy Bates, Grenadier Guards, was killed in action on April 14. He joined the colours in August 1915, was gassed in April 1915 and wounded in September, 1917, and was through most of the heavy fighting in France during the whole of the war. He was an excellent lad and his death is much regretted by his fellow-employees in Messrs P.J. Carroll and Co Two other brothers are serving, one in the army and one at sea. They are grandsons of Mr John Taafe, Chapel Street.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 June 1918

            (see Bates, Harry)

 

BEAMISH, Pioneer, OSWALD KINGSTON, 36 Division Signal Corps, Royal Engineers. From Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Served in France 1915 to 1918. Later joined the RAF as Second Lieutenant. Service record available on Ancestry.co.uk

1901 Census: Oswald Beamish age 4, lived at 19 Castle Street, place of birth Co Louth. One sister , Agnes age 1, also born Co Louth. Son of Thomas George Beamish, age 32, occupation accountant, and Agnes R(ainey) Beamish, age 27.

1911 Census: shows Oswald Beamish age 15 living at 19 Castle Street, Dundalk, with five siblings. Now stated that all born Co Cork, religious denomination, Presbyterian. .

 

BECK, P, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Postman in Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BECKERSON, Chaplain, Rev W T.

The departure of Rev W T Beckerson who is leaving Drogheda to take up a chaplaincy in the Army, is regretted by the congregation of St Peter’s and a wide circle of friends with whom he was extremely popular. Rev H A Colvin, Curate of Christ Church, Gorey, County Wexford has, it is announced, been appointed to fill the vacancy curacy. (Drogheda Advertiser, 16 September 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: William Townley Beckerson age 10,  resident at 59 Leinster Square, Dublin, Rathmines, Dublin. Father Robert Evan Beckerson, age 40, occupation Civil Service Clerk, Higher Division, Chief Secretary’s Office. Born Surrey, England. Mother, Emily K, age 36, born Dundalk. All Church of Ireland.

1911 Census: William Townley Beckerson age 20,  resident at 3 Prince Arthur Terrace, Rathmines & Rathgar West, Dublin. Occupation,  student at Trinity College, Dublin. Father Robert Evan Beckerson, age 50, occupation Civil Service Clerk, Higher Division, Local Government Board. Born Surrey, England. Mother, Emily Kate, age 45, born Dundalk. All Church of Ireland.

 

BEGGAN, Second Lieutenant, T F. From Stabannon. 4th Border Regiment. Enlisted as private and promoted. Served in France from December 1916 to June 1917. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

Mr James Beggan, Stabannon, has received word that his son, 2nd Lieut. T F Beggan, was wounded in the fighting at St. Quentin, but is getting on well in hospital. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 October 1918)

1901 Census: Thomas F Beggan shown at house 10 Evelyn Street, Carrickmacross, age 9 born Co Monaghan. Mother Mary, age 44 born Co Down. Three other children, all born in Co Monaghan.

1911 Census: Family with James Beggan as Head of Household, shown at house 10 Stabannan. Age 53, occupation Retired Constable, Royal Irish Constabulary. Born Co Fermanagh. Thomas F shown as a student in St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra.

 

BEGLEY, Sergeant, ROBERT, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Quay Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916). Joined Royal Dublin Fusiliers in 1901. Married Margaret McKenna of Dundalk, 1911. Service file available of ancestry.co.uk.

1911 Census at house 1.2 Townparks, Dundalk. (The Educational Institution)  Robert Begley, age 28, born Dublin, occupation Drill Instructor and Domestic Servant.

 

BELL, Second Lieutenant, J, Royal Field Artillery. From Killen Park, Dundalk

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

            For possible census record see Thomas Bell.

 

BELL, THOMAS, Australian Contingent. From Killen Park, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

109 Thomas Gillespie Bell, 3rd Light Horse Regiment, Australian Imperial Forces. Enlisted 16 August 1914. Age 20, occupation, Fruit Grower. Church of Ireland. Next of kin, J D Bell, Killin (sic), Dundalk, Co Louth, father. Previous military experience, one year Officer Training Corps, Aldenham School, England. Promoted Lance Corporal, 10 October 1915; Corporal 19 December 1915;  Temporary Sergeant, 24 December 1916, relinquished Temporary Sergeant, 24 February 1917. Served in Gallipoli July to December 1915. Egypt, wounded, gunshot wound in the back/neck,  at the Battle of Romani, east of the Suez Canal,  on 4 August 1916. Embarked for Australia 15 November 1918. Discharged 5 May 1919. Awarded 1914 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. Corresponded with military authorities on 21 January 1921, in relation to medals from his home address in Baronstown, Dundalk, Co Louth.

1901 Census, Thomas Bell, age 7 living at house 1 Killen, Faughart. Born Co Louth.  Four siblings, including John D A Bell age 3. Father, John Dobbin Bell, age 62, born Co  Armagh, occupation Civil Servant. Florence A Bell mother, age 38. All Church of Ireland.

1911 Census, Thomas at same address, father’s occupation is Magistrate Farmer. No sign of John D A Bell.

 

BELL, WILLIAM, from  Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

BELLINGHAM, Lieutenant Colonel, EDWARD, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham, Co. Louth. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

Mr Edward Bellingham, eldest son of Sir Henry Bellingham, Bart, who has been Secretary to the British Embassy at Guatemala (Central America), was recalled by cable from the War Office and arrived home at Castlebellingham on Wednesday; and will presently, it is expected, rejoin his old regiment at the front. Mr. Bellingham served through the South African war as an officer of the Royal Scots, and has thus the advantage of campaigning experience which will serve him in good stead n this year. His brother, Captain Roger Bellingham was ADC to the Lord Lieutenant, rejoined his brigade of Field Artillery at the outbreak of the war and has been through the whole campaign from the battle of the Marne down to the present. We hope the brothers will share the same good luck in the succeeding stages of the war. Both of them , like their distinguished father, are staunch Home Rulers and most popular  in their native county. Mr Edward Bellingham married some years since the widow of Captain Gough, grand-son of the late Sir F. Gough, V.C. K.C.B.

(Dundalk Democrat, 3 October 1914)

 

Mr Edward Bellingham (who with Mrs Bellingham and their daughter have been staying at Castlebellingham for the last week or so) has been ordered to Buttevant to join the 8th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, in which he has been appointed Captain and Adjutant. (Dundalk Democrat, 17 October 1914)

           

Amongst the 48th Brigade you have plenty of Louth men, gentlemen such as Major Bellingham, whom every man in the 8th Dublins loves, and would give up their lives to follow him everywhere” (Dundalk Democrat, 4 September 1915)

           

A Stabannon man serving in the 8th Batt. Dublin Fusiliers, sends us the following: - To the Editor of the “Democrat”

Dear Sir – I am sending you a list of men from Castlebellingham and district that answered the call. I hope you will find space to publish it. We are always watching Monday’s post for the “Democrat” to arrive. You can hear inquiries all along the line with the Louth boys: “Did the ‘Democrat’ come yet? You can see we are well represented in all regiments, and we all hope to be among our friends safe again in gallant little Louth, and sorry our fallen comrades will not be with us: -

Major E H C P Bellingham, Adj 8th R,D,F.

Capt. Roger Bellingham (roll of honour)

Major W Garstin (roll of honour)

Lieut Walter Henry, Richardstown Castle

-          Campbell, Crinstown

Thomas Flood, Castlebellingham

James Connolly, Castlebellingham

John Hoey, Castlebellingham

James Lambe, Castlebellingham

Thomas Carroll, Castlebellingham

John Hodgers, Castlebellingham

Owen Campbell, Castlebellingham

Patrick Thomas, Castlebellingham

James Hoey, Castlebellingham

Christopher Heffernan, Castlebellingham

Thomas Reilly, Castlebellingham

William Henry, Castlebellingham

John Henry, Castlebellingham

Thos C Walsh (nephew of M Clinton Esq., Annagassan)

John Carolan, Castlebellingham

John Lynch, Castlebellingham

John Callan, Castlebellingham

Joseph King, Castlebellingham

Patrick Sharkey, Castlebellingham

James Keaskin, Seabank

Patrick Kenny, Annagassan

John Wallace, Castlebellingham

Michael Wallace, Castlebellingham

Peter Kearney, Castlebellingham

Joseph Kearney, Castlebellingham

James Kearney, Castlebellingham

John McCabe, Castlebellingham

Thomas McCabe, Castlebellingham

Thomas McCabe (jun.), Castlebellingham

John McCabe (jun.), Castlebellingham

George Goodlow, Castlebellingham (navy)

Christopher Garland, Castlebellingham

Edward Carron, Castlebellingham

Howard Donnan, Castlebellingham

Charles Collins, Castlebellingham

John McAllister, Castlebellingham

William McAllister, Castlebellingham

Isaac McAllister, Castlebellingham

William Bell, Castlebellingham

David White, Castlebellingham (roll of honour)

John Connolly, Castlebellingham

Richard Fanning, Castlebellingham

Albert O’Brien, Castlebellingham

William Cranston, Castlebellingham

Robert Treadwell, Castlebellingham

Andrew Connolly, Castlebellingham

John Connolly, Castlebellingham

Patrick Stephens, Annagassan (navy)

Thomas McKeever, Annagassan (navy)

John Meade, Castlebellingham

John Wade, Castlebellingham

Daniel Hanratty, Castlebellingham

Patrick Feehan, Mansfieldstown

John Byrne, Stabannon (wounded)

Joseph Finnegan, Stabannon and Dromin

Charles Finnegan, Dromin

John E Finnegan (of running fame), Dromin (wounded at Suvla)

Andrew O’Neill, Dromin (missing)

Bernard O’Neill, Dromin (wounded)

Francis Hynes, Dromin

James Hynes, Dromin

Frederick Hynes, Dromin

Owen Carroll, Dromin (roll of honour)

O Connors (3), Charleville

John Culligan, Castlebellingham

John Sheils, Castlebellingham

Joseph Byrne, Black Mills (wounded)

Pat Carroll, Milestown

Pat Nixon, Milestown

John Morgan, Milestown

Peter Conachy, Milestown

J Hoey, Stabannon

Peter Madden, Annagassan

John Sullivan, Annagassan

Maxwell McKenna, Kilsaran

Peter Lynch, Annagassan.

 

Not bad for a radius of 5 miles. I have not a list of the Dunleer men or Dromiskin district. (Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915)

 

Major Edward Bellingham has been home on a short leave. He is now second in command of the 8th Dublin Fusiliers, in which there are many Co. Louth men. Letters that have reached us from men in the battalion state that Major Bellingham is idolised by his men. He possesses all those qualities that so strongly marked his late brother, Roger, who has given his life for the cause of freedom and civilisation in this war. Every man feels that in Major Bellingham he has an officer prepared to share fully in all of the risks and hardships of campaigning, full of sympathy, kindness and consideration, understanding his men as one born and bred amongst them The battalion will be going to the front one of these days. Everyone in Louth will wish Major Bellingham and his men good luck, speedy victory, and a safe return.

(Dundalk Democrat, 13 November 1915)

 

Major Bellingham, who was second in command of the 8th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers has been appointed Lieut. Col., and is now in full command. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 February 1916)

 

Sir Henry Bellingham sends us the following extract from a letter written by his son, Colonel Bellingham, which will be read with much interest on his account and that of the man brave Co. Louth men who are serving in his battalion, some of whom we regret to see have given their lives for the cause of freedom and humanity. Colonel Bellingham writes:

 We were in action on the 27th and 29th April. My battalion bore the brunt of the right attack, and behaved archly. The Commander-in-Chief came down to see us and congratulate us. He shook hands with me, and said very nice things. I am sending you some of the papers we received. Poor George Magee and Thomas Lambe, of Castle Bellingham; Wm Hoey, of Darver, P. Macken of Ardee; and J Murphy of Drogheda are among the killed. Please express to their people my profound sympathy in their losses. We had heavy casualties, but 50 per cent will return eventually. Our men are furious with the Sinn Féiners, and asked to be allowed to go and finish them up. We were defending the Empire with serious losses the very day these people were trying to help the Germans that we were fighting. It is all too sad.”

 

“Monday, 1st May, 1916 – The G O C wishes to thank all ranks of the Brigade for their good work during the last few days fighting, and especially the 8th Dublin Fusiliers for their gallant stand they made against the German assault on 27th ult. All battalions have fully maintained the highest tradition of their regiments and have shown the finest fighting spirit of the Irish soldier.

“German attack, 27th April 1916 – Irish Division – To Lieutenant-Colonel E Bellingham. I am directed by Sir Charles Munroe, commanding 1st Army, to convey to you and to the officers, N C officers and men of the battalion under your command his appreciation of the conduct of the battalion on the occasion of the German attack on April27th. To these congratulations I wish to add my own. – W B Hickie, Major General, commanding 16th Division.

 

Copy of letter from Chaplain of 8th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers (sic)

Whitehall, Keash, 16-5-16

Dear Sir Henry – I have the honour to introduce myself as Catholic Chaplain to the 8th Battalion, of which your son is C O. I am sure you have heard of the recent severe engagements our battalion had in France, but you may not have heard of the shrewd judgement and splendid courage displayed by Col. Bellingham in the attacks. To him, more than to any other person in the battalion, is out r success due. Colonel Bellingham besides being a most valiant soldier, is an intensely pious Catholic. I congratulate you, as I have congratulated him. May God spare him to us – yours truly, Felix Burke.  (Dundalk Democrat, 20 May 1916)

 

… The 8th R. Dublin Fusiliers advanced to the Second Objective at zero plus 40 minutes (5.25 p.m.) and gained the position without encountering very-serious opposition. At 5.40 p.m., it was found that the Battalion had proceeded about 300 yards beyond the objective, and the Commanding Officer took prompt steps back his men who had now been reinforced by the 8th R. Inniskilling Fus. to the real objective, and to start them on digging a trench about 50 yards east of the German trench.… At this juncture the Officer Commanding the 8th Royal Dublin Fusiliers arrived at Headquarters, 7th R. Irish Rifles to consult with the O.C. who had been knocked over by a shell and severely shaken. At the request of the 7th Royal Irish Rifles the O.C. 8th R. Dublin Fusiliers made a tour of the whole brigade front and withdrew some parties of the 7th Royal Irish Rifles from the Second Objective to consolidate the First Objective…

I wish to express my extreme satisfaction at the spirit, courage and determination displayed by all ranks during the operations and in particular of the action of Lieut-Col E Bellingham, 8th R. Dublin Fusiliers, who at a time when troops were elated with success and without officers, was able to control the situation and organise the defences. When it is remembered that the troops had been out in the so-called trenches which were in reality merely shell holes, for five days and nights prior to the attack, during which period they were wet through by rain and did not have a chance of obtaining a hot meal, I submit that the highest credit is reflected on all ranks that the capture of Ginchy (sic) was effected under these adverse conditions, and that the traditions of the Irish race were worthily upheld by these men of the New Armies.

F Ramsey, Brigadier General Commanding 48th Infantry Brigade, 15.9.16

(Extracts from ‘Report on Operations of 48th Infantry Brigade on 8th and 10th September, 1916 in attack on Guinchy, War Diary of 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles).

 

Lieut.-Col. Bellingham and the men of his Battalion have been specially commended by the Brigadier-General on their gallantry in the recent fighting at Guinchy and their names are to be entered in to the record of the Irish Division. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 September 1916)

 

Though no public announcement of the fact has yet been made, we learn from a relative of one of the officers serving with the battalion that Colonel Battalion has been accorded the D.S.O. in recognition of the gallant part recently taken by his battalion in the Somme fighting. Colonel Bellingham both before and since the battalion went to the front had won the repute of a most capable officer, and by the officers and men of his battalion he is held in the warmest affection and esteem. It is their opinion – and there are no better judges – that their Colonel well deserves the distinction that has been awarded him.

(Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

           

(Award of Distinguished Service Order to) Temp Lt.-Col. Edwin Henry Charles Patrick Bellingham, R. Dub. Fusiliers

For conspicuous gallantry in action. He took command of the two leading battalions when the situation was critical, and displayed the greatest determination under shell and machine gun fire. The success of the operation was largely due to his quick appreciation of the situation, and his rapid consolidation of the position.

(Supplement to the London Gazette, 20 October 1916)

 

On Tuesday, October 10th, Lieut – Col Bellingham was received in private audience at Buckingham Palace by the King, who personally conferred upon him the Order of D S O and complimented him, and the Irish Battalion that he commands, for their distinguished bravery in the recent fighting near Guinchy. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

We hear unofficially that Col. Edward Bellingham has been promoted to the rank of Brigadier General. Even in the records of rapid promotion brought about by the war we doubt if there is anything to equal Brigadier General Bellingham’s. When the war broke out he was filling a Consular post in Central America, came home and accepted a Lieutenant’s commission, was almost immediately promote Adjutant (for which his previous military experience fitted him), then Major, and within a few months Colonel of his battalion of the 16th Division. We doubt if in all the British Army, and that is at present a very expansive range, there is an officer in whom his men have such confidence or who is am much respected and beloved by them. His rapid promotion has nothing of official favour or influence behind it, but is the reward of merit. Though we have no reason to say so, beyond what we have heard from soldiers of the battalion home on leave, we should not be surprised to find that it was the work he did on the bloody day of Guinchy for which he has already been decorated by the King, that singled him out for the responsible post he has been called upon to fill.

(Dundalk Democrat, 17 February 1917)

 

Brigadier-General Bellingham was home on leave last week and was warmly greeted by a host of friends in and around Castlebellingham.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 September 1917)

 

Brig-Gen Bellingham Missing

We deeply regret to learn that Brig-Gen Edward Bellingham, eldest and only surviving son of Sir Henry Bellingham, Bart, H M L, is reported ‘missing’ since the recent battle on the Somme. No details have reached us, beyond the bare statement of fact. Everybody will join in hoping that better news may arrive later as in the case of very many officially reported missing.

Brig-Gen Bellingham was in Central America, where he held a diplomatic appointment, at the outbreak of the war, and at once came home and offered his services. His devotion to duty and later on his great gallantry  and resourcefulness in the field won for him rapid promotion, and over six months ago he attained the rank of Brigadier-General, being at the same time personally decorated by King George for his gallantry in action. The British army can ill afford to lose such a man especially at this critical juncture. It is however to be hoped that his father, who has the respect of all classes in Co Louth, and who has already lost one son (the late Captain Roger Bellingham) in the war, will be spared this second and grievous loss. (Dundalk Democrat, 13 April 1918).

 

General Edward Bellingham, C M G, D S O, D L, only surviving son of Sir Henry, is at present on leave at Castle Bellingham. Some friends in Dundalk whom he visited during the week were delighted to find that he is apparently none the worse for his six months’ incarceration in Germany.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 February 1919)

 

A meeting convened by Brig-General Bellingham of the demobilised sailors and soldiers of Castlebellingham, Kilsaran, Annagassan, and adjoining districts was held in Annagassan on Sunday. General Bellingham explained the provisions of the Act and suggested that farmers’ sons, farm labourers or others having a knowledge of agriculture should apply to the Estates Commissioners for a farm on one of the soldiers’ farm colonies, and in the case of men who do not wish to rely on farming for a living, they should apply to the L C B for a cottage and a plot. In conclusion General Bellingham expressed the pleasure it gave him to meet so many of his old comrades in arms. His earnest wish is, on completion of military service, to live amongst them. He would always give his best efforts in opening up and developing any feasible local industries that would give employment to his neighbours, especially those who served in the war. He suggested that the ex-servicemen form a club to look after their interests under the new Act, or in the alternative form a branch of the Comrades of the Great War or the Discharged or Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation.

Immediately afterwards a branch of the D S and S A was formed of which the following officials were appointed – President, Jas Hosie; Treasurer, Robt. Donnan, Secretary, Owen Campbell. About 50 members were enrolled.

(Dundalk Democrat, 17 January 1920)

 

BELTON, JAMES, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Could be the following:

BELTON, JAMES, 208245, Royal Engineers from Milltown, Dromiskin, Co Louth.  Enlisted November 1915, aged 19. Served in France. Demobilised 1919. Next-of-kin, Elizabeth Belton, Milltown, Castlebellingham, Co Louth, mother. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk

1911 Census: James Belton age 13  lived at house 12, Whiterath, Dromiskin. Co Louth. Nephew of Judith Belton, age 74, head of household. Also resident is Lizzie Belton, age 37, niece.

 

BENNETT, Private, P, 8125, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Prisoner of war.

The following letter was received during the week by Messrs Backhouse, and Co., Ltd., Dundalk: -

No 8125 Pte P. Bennett, Batt II., Komp 6, Sekt.29, Kriegegegelangenen Lager, Limburg (Lahn), Germany.

Sir – I write you on behalf of myself and four other Dundalk men who are prisoners of war in this camp. I would be obliged if you could help us by sending out some tobacco, cigarettes and eatables. What I would suggest are – bread, cake, butter, sugar, cocoa or tea, milk, tinned meat, or anything that you think would travel all right, such as cheese, jam etc. I may say that we will call to you when we return to Dundalk. The five of us are married men, and it will be readily understood that out wives are not in a position to send us a great deal. Our names are as follows, but if you wish to send the parcels to me I will undertake to distribute them:- No 8125 Pte. P Bennett, Royal Irish Fusiliers; No 7481 Pte. J Grimes, Royal Irish Rifles; No 7769 Pte P Livings, Royal Munster Fusiliers; No 7466 Pte. A Crilly, 8th Lanc. Regt.; No 7642 Pte P Rice, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Mr Backhouse is taking steps to have a supply of the articles mentioned in this letter sent out at once. If this is to be continued, as suggested  by the letter, and it should be done if these men are actually in need of eatables, it will be desirable for others in Dundalk to interest themselves in this matter. In the meantime in order to place beyond any doubt the bona fides of this letter, we would ask that the relatives of the soldiers whose names are appended should communicate at once with Mr Backhouse, who is prepared to take a strong personal interest in complying with the request made. (Dundalk Democrat, 29 May, 1915)

           

Ex-soldiers assaulted in Dundalk

Gang chased through Ramparts

Last night two Dundalk ex-servicemen named Patrick Bennett and Bob Begley, both of who were wearing poppies, were proceeding towards the Hibernian Hall (in which the local British Legion were holding a dance). In Jocelyn Street the two men were set upon by a party of nine young men, their poppies snatched from their breasts and the two men were knocked on the pathway where, it is alleged, they were kicked. One of the men was badly cut about the face and the other was injured in the arm.

After the assault the men who had been responsible dashed down Distillery Lane and along the Ramparts. Some of the ex-servicemen who heard about the incident at once gave chase, but they were unable to catch the men who had run away. Word was sent to the Guards in Anne Street and a patrol immediately came on the scene. At a late hour last night no arrests had been made.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 November 1932).

 

Patrick Bennett was a professional soldier before the war, and as a Private in 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, landed in France  on 22 August 1914. (UK National Archives, Medal Card Index WO 372/2/348944)

 

BERGIN, Colour-Sergeant, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BERMINGHAM, Sergeant Major, - , 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census, at house 97.2 Georges’ Street East, Drogheda, Edward Bermingham, age 34, born Co Cork, occupation Sergeant Major, Warrant Officer, Regular Army.

 

BILL, Sergeant, - , 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Possibly 2112 Acting Corporal Henry Bill, Leinster Regiment,  Served in France from 17 December 1915. Discharged 21 February 1919.(UK National Archives Medal Card Index WO 372/2/386088)

 

BIRD, Private, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Curry’s Hill, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BLACK, Lance-Corporal, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Collon. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

 

BLACK, Lance-corporal, P, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

BLACK, Private, Robert. From Collon. ‘Training at Cork’.

(Drogheda Advertiser,15 January 1916). On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

BLACK, Private, A, Royal Irish Rifles. From Collon. ‘In training at Cork’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1915)

 

BLACKOE, WILLIAM. Irish Guards. Late of the firm of Brady and Son, West End Drapery, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Possible link. Death Notice. Blackoe.(Drogheda). Sept.27 1948 (suddenly)  at her residence , 46 West Street, Josephine, widow of William Blackoe, Deeply regretted by her sorrowing family. .. Funeral from St Peter’s Catholic Church to New Cemetery today (Thursday) at 2 o’c. ( Irish Independent 30 September 1948)

 

BLAKE, HENRY. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

BOLTON, Colonel, CLIVE, Military Cross. From, Castlering, Dundalk, (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

A copy of Lancaster paper sent us a report of the regimental sports of 7th Royal Lancasters, now in camp on Salisbury Plain, and presently destined for the front. A Co. Louth man, Col. Clive Bolton, is in command of the battalion, and the paper says his personal popularity with the men helped to make the sports very successful. Col. Bolton won the officer’s race, displaying an agility that the youngest 2nd Lieutenant might envy. (see also John Macardle)

(Dundalk Democrat, 24 July 1915)

1911 Census, Clive Bolton, age 45, born Co Louth. Boarding at house 1.1 Seatown Place, occupation Retired Colonel.

           

Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin.

No.1920 Right side of number 1918:  In Loving Memory of Colonel ARCHER CLIVE BOLTON (58th) 2nd Batt. Northamptonshire Regt and 7th Batt. (The King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regt. B.E.F. France, second son of the late RICHARD BOLTON J.P. Castle Ring, Co. Louth  called home 17th October 1930  "The Lord is my strength and my shield my heart trusted in him".  Ps. 26. 7 (Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: Headstones: Dublin, Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin, Part 13),

 

 BOND, Private, J, 5 Battalion, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BOND, JOHN, Royal Field Artillery. From Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

BONNER, HENRY, Royal Engineers. Worked on Great Northern Railways. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

BOTHWELL, JAMES HENRY, 2009041, Canadian Engineers, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.   Address,  1409 Chester Pike,  Eddystone, PA, USA. Born  1 December 1890, Willville, Carlingford, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation, Protestant. Occupation Machinist.  Next-of-kin, Samuel Bothwell, Willville, Carlingford, Co Louth, father.  Attested  6 May 1918 at Toronto, Canada. 

1911 Census, James Henry Bothwell, age 20, lived at house 25 Wilville, Greenore, Co Louth. Father Samuel, age 54, occupation Farmer, mother Mary Jane, age 54, and five siblings, all born Co. Louth.

 

BOURKE, JAMES, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From St. Patrick’s Terrace, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

BOWDEN, RICHARD (c1879 – 1952)                                                                                                                            Born at Sheetland Rd, Termonfeckin in c1879. Buried in Termonfeckin graveyard in 1952. Headstone inscription advises:

In loving memory of Richard Bowden Sheetland Rd. Died 6th Jan 1952 aged 72 years.

Obituary in Drogheda Independent of 19th Jan 1952 noted:

He fought in the First World War in France as a member of a British tank crew.

(Source: Declan Quaile).

1911 Census: Richard Bowden age 32, lived at House Termonfecekin, occupation Agricultural Labourer. Mother, Elizabeth Bowden, age 70, widow, occupation Famer. Two siblings. All born Co Louth.

Bowden(Termonfeckin, Drogheda), 6 January 1952, at his residence Sheetland Road, Termonfeckin, Richard, beloved husband of Mary Bowden; deeply regretted ... etc. (Irish Press, 7 January 1952. )

 

BOYD, ALEXANDER, 253010, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 350 14th Street, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. Born 9 October 1882, Co Louth,  Ireland. Religious affiliation,  Presbyterian. Occupation Chauffeur.  Next-of-kin, C Boyd, 622 15th Street, Manitoba, Canada, brother. Attested 31 May 1916, Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

BOYLAN, Private, J, 229892,  Leinster Regiment. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916).

Real name Patrick Carr, from Dublin, with extensive military service East Lancashire Regiment, no 3042. In these papers John Boylan is identified as next-of-kin, a step-brother. See ancestry.co.uk

Enlisted as John Boylan, 229892, 28 August 1914. Served in the Mediterranean and France. Wounded in Gallipoli. Full service record available on www.ancestry.co.uk.

 

In the 1911 Census, there is a Boylan family living at 27 Trinity Street. Head of family is Mary Anne, age 50, married for 33 years, eight children living with her, oldest aged 32.  There may or may not be a connection.

 

Ex-Soldier’s Body found in canal.

Seemingly less than an hour in the water, the body of Patrick Carr, middle-aged, British Army pensioner, (who had been lodging in Hammond Lane . of Church Street, Dublin) was found in the Grand Canal at the third lock, Inchicore, last evening.

Gardai removed the body to the Dublin Union. The discovery was made as a Dublin-bound boat was being let through the lock. (Irish Press, 20 December 1934)

 

Body in canal.

Inquest on army pensioner.

A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned when Dr D A McErlean, City Coroner, with a jury, held an inquest yesterday on Patrick Carr (60), British Army pensioner, whose body was found in the Grand Canal at Inchicore.

Garda M. Fitzpatrick said that the chamber of the canal lock was crossed by a plank, sometimes used as a footbridge. He believed that Carr fell off the plank.

John Moore, publican, said that the deceased had four drinks in his premises on Wednesday evening. Carr said that he was not feeling well, and that owing to his nerves, he could not endure the noises of the city.

John Boyle, 153 Rialto Cottages, identified the body.

Dr J A Hynes M.O. Dublin Union , gave medical evidence.

Sergt. C F English represented the Gardai. (Irish Press,  22 December 1934)

 

BOYLAN, THOMAS, 6168, Engineers, Australian Imperial Force. Age 35 years and one month. Born Drogheda . Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Mrs Mary Jane Sheridan, Baltray , Drogheda, Co Louth, sister.  Previous military experience, three months Yarmouth Militia (resigned). Enlisted  24 August 1915. 20 September  1915 charged with being ‘absent without leave from 5 p.m. to 9.30. p.m.’ Fined ten shillings. 8 October 1915, charged with ‘bringing intoxicating liquor into camp’.  Fined ten shillings. Absent without leave 10 – 12 November 1915 (3 days). Forfeit 3 days pay, and recommended for discharge. General character ‘very indifferent’. Discharge effective from 26 October 1915, ‘unlikely to become an efficient soldier’.

 

BOYLE, Private, - , Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BOYLE, Private, BERNARD, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 21 Mary Street North, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Possibly 7512 Bernard Boyle, joined the army in 1902, applied for re-engagement August 1914.   Next-of- kin, P Boyle, 13 Casey’s Place, Dundalk. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk

1901 Census, Peter Boyle lived at 13 Casey’s Place, Dundalk, age 45, occupation Engine Driver, Catherine Boyle, age 46, Housekeeper,; Lizzie Boyle, daughter, Laundress, and Patrick Kerley, age 3, grandson.

1911 Census the family had moved to 54 Mary Street North, Dundalk.

 

BOYLE, EDWARD, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

BOYLE, Private, 21159, HUGH, 3 Royal Irish Fusiliers. Next of kin, Ann Boyle, Proleek, Dundalk. Enlisted August 1915, served overseas, discharged May 1918. Attestation papers available of www.ancestry.co.uk

1911 Census: Hugh Boyle lived at house 9 Proleek, Ballymascanlon, Dundalk.  Age 23. Occupation Quarry Man. Anne Boyle, age 74, mother. Brother John, age 16, occupation Yard Boy. .

 

BOYLE, JAMES, Royal Engineers. From West Gate, Drogheda. Formerly billiard marker Catholic Club. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census: James Boyle, born Co Louth,  age 20, occupation Caretaker Catholic club, lived at 62 West Street, Drogheda. Julia Boyle, born Co Meath, age 56, head of household. Five siblings, all born Co Louth.  

 

BOYLE, -, WILLIAM, Royal Navy. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: William Boyle, age 7 lived at House 4 Rope Walk, Drogheda. Margaret Boyle age 29, mother and head of household. Brother Patrick, age 9.

 

BOYLE, Lieutenant, (WILLIAM) EAMONN. Machine Gun Company. From Dromiskin, Dundalk. With the Royal Irish Fusiliers.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Lieutenant W E Boyle, Machine Gun Company, has been admitted to hospital suffering from a wound in the ankle. He is a son of Mr W Boyle, J P, Dromiskin, the well known Irish author and dramatist. The wound is not serious, as Lieutenant Boyle has been able to communicate with his father. The note was written from No. 4 (Base) Hospital, France, and it can only be conjectured in what locality during the recent advance he received the injury.

(Dundalk Democrat, 7 October 1916)

           

Lieut. Boyle, son of Wm Boyle, J P, Dromiskin, who was recently wounded, has now recovered and rejoined his battalion at the front.

(Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

           

Lieut Boyle, son of Mr W Boyle, J P, reported in these columns as wounded some couple of months ago, has been in hospital until the other day, when he was allowed home on convalescent leave, and is at present staying with his father at Dromiskin. (Dundalk Democrat, 2 December 1916)

 

Mr William Boyle, dramatist, was born in Dromiskin in April 1853. He served for forty year as an Excise  Officer, settling in London, while associating with Irish literary and dramatic movement that brought him considerable fame as a writer and dramatist. His plays, such as ‘The Eloquent Dempsey’ and ‘The Mineral Workers’ were big successes in the Abbey Theatre. On his retirement from the civil service, he returned to Dromiskin where he was appointed a Justice of the Peace on the recommendation of Sir Henry Bellingham. He left Ireland in 1921  and lived in Herne  Hill, London up to his death.  (Extracted from obituary, Freeman’s Journal, 8 March 1923)

 

BOYLE WILLIAM, born Dundalk. No 1187, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, enlisted 27 October 1914, discharged 1 December 1914.. Full file available on ancestry.co.uk.

Census 1911: William Boyle, age 24, lived at 14 Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. Occupation Iron Moulder. Father William R Boyle, age 66, occupation General Labour. Mother, Elizabeth Boyle, age 69. Two siblings All born Co Louth.

 

BRADLEY, ROBERT JOHN, 2115253, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address  Nairn Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada.  Born 31 July 1893, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Church of England. Occupation, Supervisor of Deaf and Dumb School.  Next-of-kin, Mrs Mary Jane Bradley, 2 Chamber Street, Belfast, mother. Currently serving in Militia. Attested 16 May 1917 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

1901 Census: Robert Bradley age 7, born Co Louth, lived at house 6, Farrendreg, Castletown, Dundalk, Co Louth. Seven siblings. All born Co Louth. Father was William Bradley age 44, born Co Cork, occupation Coachman; mother Mary Jane, age 37, born Queen’s County, occupation Housekeeper.

1911 Census, family now living at house 16 Farrendreg, Dundalk. Robert’s occupation is Railway Clerk..

 

BRADSHAW, RICHARD (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

1911 Census, Possibly Richard Bradshaw age 14, occupation Scholar, lived at house 6 Shortstone West, Creggan Upper, Co Louth. Born Co Louth. Father,  John, age 52, born Co Wicklow, occupation Land Steward;  mother, Eliza, age 52 born Co Cavan. One brother Robert, age 18, occupation Agri Labourer. All Irish Church.

 

BRADY, J, Royal Irish Rifles. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BRADY, Private, J, Munster Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

BRADY, JAMES, Royal Irish Rifles. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BRADY, Driver, JOHN, Royal Field Artillery. From Peter Street,  Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916)

 

BRADY, Private, JOHN JOSEPH. Enlisted 1906 Royal Irish Fusiliers, subsequently served in the Royal Field Artillery (1908), and the Royal Engineers (1917). From Dundalk. Next of kin wife Ann Brady of St Helena, Dundalk. Service record available on www.ancestry.co.uk.

 

BRADY, Gunner, JOHN, Royal Navy. From Mell, Drogheda. Member of C Company, Drogheda Volunteers. Publicly honoured shortly before he left for service having rescued a woman from drowning in the Boyne.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BRANAGAN, EDWARD, Royal Irish Rifles. From Green Lanes, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) 

Possibly Edward Branigan, 4182, Parish of St Peters, Drogheda, served in Leinster Regiment, Royal Engineers and Royal Dublin Fusiliers. File available on ancestry.co.uk.

1911 Census: At house 3 Copper Alley, Fair Gate, Drogheda. Edward Branigan, age 17, occupation Labourer. Father, John Branigan, age 50, occupation Boot and Shoe Maker; Mother Bridget, age 50, three siblings, including a brother called John, age 13 (see next entry). All born Co Louth.

 

BRANIGAN,  JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. Member of C Company Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) 

 

BRANNIGAN, THOMAS, 7768, Australian Navy. Born 17 July 1884, Baltray, Drogheda, Co Louth. Enlisted 26 January 1913 for 3 years. ‘On loan from RN’ (?). Re-enlisted 26 January 1915 for five years.  Good conduct badge deprived  9 August 1915. Restored 9 February 1916. Second badge awarded 9 August 1916. Demobilised 27 May 1917. Passage back to United Kingdom granted. ‘Approved to be discharged “Invalided” forthwith. Has no claim to war pension or compensation. Passage from Sydney to United Kingdom provided  on  (13/7/17).’ The original record is very faint and difficult to decipher.

 

BRAY, H, Royal Irish Rifles. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BREEN, Corporal, VINCENT, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Duleek Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BREMNER, WALTER, 491152, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 8 November 1881, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation, Church of England. Occupation Moulder.  Next-of-kin, Mrs N Bremner , 14 Arthur (Ave?). St Thomas,  Ontario, wife. Attested  11 January 1915 at  St Thomas, Ontario. 

 

BRENNAN, Private, E, Irish Guards. From Dundalk.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Killed in action  9.10.1917, see The Unreturned Army.

 

BRENNAN, JAMES, from Dunleer district. ‘Joined Royal Garrison Artillery’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

Possibly 17518 James Brennan from Dunleer joined the Royal Irish Fusiliers on 8 January 1915, age 22. Served in France. Service file available on ancestor.co.uk

1911 Census: James Brennan age 17 lived at Listulk, Dunleer, born Co Meath. Father John Brennan age 67 , General Labourer, born Co Louth. Mother, Margaret Brennan, age 67

 

BRENNAN, JOHN, in the army. From Cocklehill, Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

BRENNAN, Private, T, 1987, 16 Irish Division. From Blackrock.

See HOGAN, Private, THOMAS.

 

BRIDCUT, Driver, JOHN, 76 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. From Whitemills, Mountpleasant, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

31225 John Bridcut joined Royal Field Artillery 25 November 1914.  Served in France.  Service file available on ancestry.co.uk

1911 Census: John Bridcut age 17, lived at House 1 Whitemills, Ballymascanlan, Born Co Louth. Father was John Bridcut age 59, born in England, occupation Contractor. Mother Jane Bridcut age 50, born Scotland. Two siblings, born Co Louth.

 

BRIEN, Private, TOM, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BROGAN, PATRICK, 4090097, 1 Depot Battalion, Manitoba Regiment. Address  The Manitoba Hotel, Winnipeg, Canada. Born 17 May 1889, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic.  Occupation Steel Worker. Next-of-kin, Mary Brogan, 131 Elderpark Street, Govan, Glasgow, Scotland, mother.  Drafted as defaulter,  7 January 1918 at Winnipeg.

 

BROGDEN, Lieutenant, THOMAS W. From Drogheda.

Notification has been received by his parents that Lieutenant Brogden has been wounded at the Front. Before the war Mr Brogden was employed with the Marsh Mill. (Drogheda Independent, 21 August 1915)

 

Boyne Mills, Drogheda, obtained a commission. Took part in many sporting fixtures – chiefly cricket – and also contributed at concerts.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) ((McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1911 Census: Thomas W E Brogden age 19, boarding at 48 Fair Street, Drogheda. Born England. Occupation Flax Spinning Apprentice. Church of Ireland.

 

BROWN, Sergeant, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BROWN, Lieutenant,-,  Leinster Regiment

Some of our young Dundalk men who joined the army in the past year are just gone to the front. They include Lieuts. Roe, Brown, Flynn and Hall who are all serving in the same Irish Battalion. Surgeon Lavery has also gone to France to join the medical corps there. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

 BROWN, Captain, T GERALD, 4 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Dundalk

(Tempest’s Annual 1916). Military Cross (Tempest’s Annual 1917)  

 

Award of Military Cross

For conspicuous gallantry during operations. He displayed great skill and personal courage when in command of trench mortar batteries. On one occasion he took up two mortars into a position , only part of which was held by us. On another occasion, under heavy fire, he took a heavy mortar across the open and brought it into action. (Supplement to the Edinburgh Gazette, September 28, 1916, p.1759)

 

Brother of Captain John Carolan Brown, Military Cross and Bar, who was killed in action 8 August 1918. (DH)

 

On enquiry at Roscommon Co. Hospital early this morning an Irish Independent representative learned that the condition n of Mr Thomas Gerard Brown LRCPI; LRCSI, Elgin Road, Dublin, who was accidentally shot in the leg when out with a shooting party near Roscommon on Monday evening was still serious.(Irish Independent, 4 December 1935).

 

The funeral of Mr Thomas Gerard Brown L.R.C.P.I. who died following a gun accident in Co Roscommon, took place from St.Patrick’s Cathedral to St Patrick’s Cemetery, Dundalk. There was a large attendance. Requiem mass in the Cathedral was attended by large congregation. Business premises of the town were closed during the funeral. The chief mourners were Mrs I G Brown (widow), Mrs H Brown ( sister-in-law); Miss M Brown, Sandycove; Miss M Ross; Rev Stephen  Brown; Robert Brown; John Ashley, Bournemouth, J G S Croucher, relatives.

 

Death 4 December 1935 at Roscommon Hospital, as a result of an accident, Thomas Gerard Brown of 38 Elgin Road, Dublin, second eldest son of the late R.L. Brown R.M. Funeral fro Saint Patrick’s Dundalk to New Cemetery.

 

We regret to announce the death which took place last Wednesday as the result of an accident, of Dr Gerard Brown of 38 Elgin Road Dublin. He was the second son of the late Mr R.L. Brown Resident Magistrate and educated at Clongowes Wood College and Trinity College Dublin. During the Great War Dr Brown served with the Connaught Rangers in France and was awarded the Military Cross. As a medical student he played on the St. Vincent’s Hospital Rugby team when they won the hospital’s cup. He was one of the oldest members of the Three Rock Rovers Hockey Club and also for many years a member of the Royal Dublin and Portmarnock golf clubs. A keen fisherman he was a popular member of Kells Anglers Association and a most successful dry fly fisherman.

 

Dr. Brown’s personality endeared him to the members of the various social clubs to which he belonged, including the Hibernian Catch Club, the Strollers, the University Club and the Royal Irish Yacht Club. He was beloved by his friends and by many in other walks of life, whom he always helped and tried to make their lot in life less difficult. His invariable courtesy, his geniality and his consideration for all with whom he came in contact, were true to the Irish type of family from which he sprang. The sincere sympathy of all who knew him will be with his widow and daughter and surviving brother, Mr Harry Brown, in their great sorrow.

 

Dr. O’Beirne Coroner for Roscommon opened an inquest at the County Hospital here today on the body of Mr. Thomas Gerard Brown L.R.C.P., of 38 Elgin Road, Dublin, who died this morning as a result of a gunshot wound accidentally received on Monday. Dr. Oliver Chance, Merrion Square, Dublin, stated that on Monday last, he was shooting with Dr. Brown at Rathconnor Bog. They crossed a drain within a few yards of each other and the witness carried the gun in his left hand with the catch on ‘safe’. ‘When we crossed the drain we came together and exchanged a few words. My gun was pointing to the ground a few yards in front and slightly to my right, on which side Mr. Brown was standing. With the gun still in that position I took it off “safe” and it fired. Mr Brown stepped forward with his left leg at the same time and the charge entered his leg at a range of not more than two yards. He fell to the ground. I did what I could for him and remained with  him  until he was removed  and accompanied him to the hospital.’

 

Dr. Brown, the witness added, was a personal friend of his and they had known each other for ten years or longer and came to Roscommon together from Dublin for the shoot. The gun must have gone off as a result of catching a button. Patrick Fahy, Gortalina, Ballina, who carried the game bag corroborated and added

 

I have assisted those gentlemen at the shooting for three or four years. They were always on the most friendly terms. There was a happy week or four days every time they came

 

Dr. W.G. Ridgeway Co-Surgeon stated that Dr. Brown was suffering from severe shock and gunshot wounds in the left leg. Guard McCoy, Rockfield, stated that after the accident he found Dr. Brown lying on the ground wounded. He asked him what had happened and Dr. Brown replied, “it was an accident”. The jury, without retiring returned a verdict that the cause of death was shock and heart failure, following gunshot wounds received as a result of an accident.

(Irish Times, 6 December 1935.)

 

BRUMLEY, A, Royal Field Artillery. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

BRUSH, Major, J E R , 3 Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Brohatna, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). (John Eastwood Ramsay Brush)

1901 Census: at house 1 in Broughattin, Ballymascanlon, Co Louth, Edwina Brush, age 64,  born City of Dublin. Occupation Land’s Owner. Church of Ireland. Maud Brush, daughter age 29, born Co Louth.

1911 Census, at house 1 in Broughattin, Ballymascanlon, Co Louth, John Brush age 44, born Dublin City. Occupation, Justice of the Peace (indecipherable), Major Special Reserve of officers. Edwina Brush, sister, age 40, sister, born Co. Louth.

 

Invalided.

Major J E R Brush Inniskillings, from Salonika, suffering from malaria, is of an Ulster family and is well known in Derry. (Irish Independent, 24 November 1916)

 

According to “ThePeerage.Com” accessed on 10 July 2012, quoting Burke’s Irish Family Records (1976), Brohatna House was bought by Henry Brush (1824 -1900), father of John. Major John Brush married Gwyneth Mary Prinsep in 1911. He fought in the First World War and was invalided. He died in February 1922. His son Auriol Henry Brush , apart for service in World War 2, lived in Ravensdale until 1958, when  he moved to London.

 

BUCKMAN, Sergeant-Major, -, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census, Sybil Dora Buckman, age 27, lived at house 2.1 Barrack Street West,  Westgate, Drogheda. Born England, Maried with one child, William, age 2, born England. Church of England.

 

BURKE, Sergeant, J, 2 Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BURKE, Private, JAMES, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 12 St Bridget’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

BURKE, -, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Marsh Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BURKE, TIMOTHY JOSEPH, 457948, 3 Division Machine Gunners, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 28 February 1882, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic. Occupation Fireman. Next-of-kin, Thomas Francis Burke,  Carn Dergh (sic.), Drogheda, father. Attested  15 July 1915, Montreal, Canada. 

 

BURN, WILLIAM, 5797, 26 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Age 32,born Dundalk, Co Louth.  Occupation Labourer.  Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, James Burn, Fane Valley,  Dundalk, Co Louth, brother. Enlisted 3 August 1916. Arrived in England 10 January 1917. Absent without leave 13 February 1918 to 14 February 1918 (2 days). Awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2. In France 14 March 1917. In Belgium 29 January 1918. Absent without leave 15 May 1918. Arrested (date not given). Field General Court Martial 8 June 1918: (1)  Drunkenness 30 May 1918 (2)  Offering violence to his superior officer 30 May 1918. Sentence 6 months  Hard Labour 8 June 1918. Promulgated  14 June 1918. Gun-shot wound in the right knee joint , France, 9 August 1918. To England, 17 August 1918. Back in Australia 5 January 1919. Discharged 7 February 1919. Awarded , Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

BURROUGHS, A, Royal Irish Rifles. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

BUTTERLY, PETER, born 6 September 1881, lived according to 1901 Census at House 5 Ballynagrena, Dysart, Dunleer, served in the Great War. In 1911, family had moved to house 6 Ballynagrena, Dysart, Dunlleer. Also believed to have a brother who died in the war . No further information to date.  According to the 1901 census, Peter had the following brothers, Patrick age 18, Michael, age 6, John Thomas age 4. (Paul Lennon, grand-nephew)

 

BYRNE, Private, B, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 1 July 1916)

 

BYRNE, Second Lieutenant, F J , MC, Royal Field Artillery. From Drogheda.

            Honours List

Second Lieutenant F J Byrne, M C, R F A, in last Saturday’s ‘Gazette’ is a son of the late Dr Byrne of Drogheda and Mrs Byrne. This officer received his commission some twelve months ago, and went to the Western Front about eight months since, during which time he has been with his battery, and taken part in most of the hard fighting during that period. He has been awarded the Military Cross for maintaining under considerable difficulty and danger, the lines of communication between an advanced post and his battery, this rendering good service. As a proof of appreciation, the following order was issued, and congratulations sent from the various Commanders concerned: - From the 48th Division –‘The Commander-in-Chief has awarded the Military Cross to Second-Lieutenant F J Byrne, R F A: Please convey Army Corps and Divisional Commander congratulations to him’ From Staff Captain 48th Division Artillery – ‘For information please add congratulations of the Commander Royal Artillery.’ From 24th Brigade R F A – ‘Please add congratulations of the Brigade Commander.’ Captain P A Byrne D S O, R F A attached to R F C who has been missing since October, 1916 was a brother of Second Lieutenant Byrne. Captain Byrne received the Distinguished Service Order for conspicuous bravery in flying at low altitude over the enemy lines and engaging their machines.

(Drogheda Independent, 2 November 1917, also

Drogheda Argus , 3 November 1917)

(Captain P A Byrne was killed in action on 17 October 1917. Described as a son of ‘the late Dr Byrne and Mrs J V Humphries (formerly Byrne) of Clogherhead’ - CWGC)

 

BYRNE, HUGH, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Ballagan, Cooley. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Possibly 7/19925 Pte Hugh Byrne, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, to France 22 December 1915. (UK National Archives WO 372/3/704711)

 

BYRNE, Private, J, Irish Guards. From Dunleer.

‘At present in the trenches’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

(There is a John Byrne, from Stabannon, listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

BYRNE, Private, J, 2 Company, Irish Guards. Late of Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BYRNE, Private, J. Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

 (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916).

 

BYRNE, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers, 1 Brigade, 4 Division.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BYRNE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

BYRNE, Private, JAMES, D Company, 87 (1 Battalion)  Royal Irish Fusiliers, 1 Division. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

BYRNE, JOSEPH, from Black Mills. ‘Wounded’(Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

BYRNE, Seaman, P. From Quay Street, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918.

 

BYRNE, Private, PETER, Royal Irish Rifles. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

385187 Pte Peter Byrne, 8 Royal Irish Fusiliers. (not Royal Irish Rifles) Enlisted 28 June 1915. Wife Margaret Byrne, Manse Lodge, Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. Served in France 1916-1919.  Discharged 5 March 1919. Full service file on ancestry.co.uk

 1911 Census: Peter Byrne age 18 lived at 3 Mill Street, Dundalk. Occupation Railway Labourer. Father Janie Byrne, age 56. Three siblings.

 

BYRNE, TOM, from Bellurgan.

A few weeks ago we mentioned that Mr Tom Byrne of Bellurgan (brother of Lieut F Byrne, R N R) had been taken prisoner on board a German submarine which sunk his ship. Information has now been received that Mr Byrne has reached Germany and been sent to an internment camp.

(Dundalk Democrat, 7 April 1917)

 

BYRNE, -, THOMAS, Irish Brigade. From Blackbull, Drogheda. Commander A Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 

CAHILL, THOMAS, Manchester Regiment. From Bolton Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

5437 Thomas Cahill, enlisted 9 September 1914, in Manchester. Born Drogheda, Co, Louth. Served in France. Discharged in 1916 for medical reasons. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1901 Census, Thomas Cahill, age 26, occupation Pipe Maker lived at 16 Potato Market Square, Fair Gate, Drogheda. Six siblings, all born in Drogheda.. Mary Cahill is head of household, a widow, age 50, born Wexford.

 

CAIRNES, Lance-Corporal, GEORGE. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census. Possibly George Cairnes age 16 lived at house 3 Gravel Walk, West Gate, Drogheda. Occupation Labourer.  Son of George (age 58) and Annie (age 58) Cahill. Two siblings.

 

CAIRNES, Lieutenant, H, 6 Inniskilling Dragoons. From Stameen, Drogheda. On staff of General Fanshaw

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

            Major Francis Herbert Cairnes served in Military Intelligence during World War 1 and was awarded the Military Cross in 1916. Brother of Capt Thomas A E Cairnes. (The Peerage.com, accessed July 2012)

6 Battalion Royal  Inniskilling Fusiliers  and Royal Field Artillery.

1901 Census: Francis Herbert Cairnes, age 7,  lived at House 1 Stameen (Part of) (St. Mary’s, Meath). Father was William Plunket Cairnes, age 43, Company Director, Farmer, Landowner, BA Cambridge, Born Co Meath, and Alice Jane Cairnes, age 34, born Andaman Islands. Tom Algar Elliot Cairnes age 12 and William Jameson Cairnes age 4 also resident.

See CAIRNES, Captain, THOMAS A E, below.

 

CAIRNES, Captain, THOMAS A E, 7 Dragoon Guards. From Stameen, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

Thomas Algar Elliot Cairnes. Royal Aero Club Aviators Certificate 2 October 1915.Appointed flight commander 18 January 1916, Royal Flying Corps. London Gazette, supplement, 14 February 1916. Officially an “ACE” credited with shooting down four enemy aircraft. See CAIRNES, Lieutenant, H, above

 

It is with  great regret that we  record the death of Lieut. Colonel Tom Algar Elliot Cairnes, D.S.O. Stameen, Drogheda which occurred on Saturday last.

By his passing Drogheda has lost one of its most distinguished citizens and a void has been created which will be difficult to fill, for the late Colonel Cairnes as he was known and respected over a wide area played a very important role in the commercial and social life of Drogheda for almost 40 years.

Son of the late Mr and Mrs William P Cairned he was born in 1888 and was a member of a Louth family which played a prominent part in the commercial life of the county for generations. It was his great grandfather who established Cairnes Brewery Ltd in Drogheda and deceased was Chairman of the board of Directors of this important concern until it closed  a few years ago. As well as devoting  a great deal of time and energyin the affairs of the brewery, Colonel Cairned interests spread in quite a few directions. He was managing director of Black Bull Motors Ltd. Director of Small Wares Ltd. Castlebellingham, director of the Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin, director of the Dublin Board of the Yorkshire Insurance Company and proprietor of the former Stameen Turkey Breeder Hatcheries. He was also an extensive farmer being the owner of approximately 250 acres.

He was also in charge of Cairnes’ Housing Trust which was established in 1890 to cater to some extent for the housing needs of Drogheda’s townspeople. There were 10 houses built under this scheme.

Army Career

The late Colonel Cairnes had a distinguished career in the British Army which he joined in 1906 and with which he served until 1924 when he retired  and married his late wife formerly Miss Kathleen Hosken , daughter of Lieut-Colonel Hosken. Mrs Cairnes to whom he was devoted , died in 1950.

In his army days he saw service in the First World War and with the 7th Dragoon Guards and later with the Royal Flying Corps to which he had been attached. He won the distinguished service order in 1917. In World War II Colonel Cairnes joined the Royal Air Force and served in Northern Ireland.

The deceased Gentleman who was a prominent churchman was a former secretary of the Diocesan Council of Meath and was a member of the representative Body of the Church of Ireland. In his younger days he was a keen sportsman and was a frequent follower of the Louth Hounds and other hunts.

The late Colonel Cairnes was a most charitable and kindly person who took a deep interest in the wellbeing of his employee’s by whom he was held in the highest esteem.

A cultured gentleman and a person of the highest principles he won the respect and affection of all whom he came in contact and his old-world charm innate courtesy coupled with his integrity and sense of fair play combined to make him a type of personage who is all too rare in the world today and whose passing is to be mourned by all who hold in high regard to the qualities which are synonymous with the title given to so many but fitting to so few of gentleman. (The Drogheda Independent)

The chief mourners were his son Mr David Cairnes, a daughter Mrs A k Purdon, Lisnabin, Killucan, Co Westmeath and a brother Major F.H Cairnes M.C. Suffolk. He is also survived by Mrs S Woods, Kilsharvin, Drogheda, Mrs L Hunt, Drogheda, Mrs Shorter, Balrothery, Major C R P Barrow, Mayne Manor, Castlebellingham, and Mrs Bellingham, Dunany House, Dunleer and Mrs and Mrs R Russell, Co Waterford (relatives).

The Primate of Ireland , Most Rev Dr James McCann, the Bishop of Meath, Most Rev Dr Pyke and the Dean of Clonmacnoise, Rev R J Charters officiated at the interment in St Mary’s Churchyard on Monday. The coffin was borne from St Mary’s Protestant Church to the churchyard by members of the staff of the deceased’s farm at Stameen . The attendance included representatives of various forms throughout the country with some of which Lieut.Col Cairnes was connected.

Among the firms represented were Messrs John Jameson and Sons (Capt C W Robertson), Messrs Preston Bros and Co Ltd and Directors of Messrs Guinness (Squadron Leader D E Dixon) Black Bull Motors; Capt Peter Jury Managing Director Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin and Mrs Jury, Motor Distributors and Volkswagon Distributors. (Drogheda Independent, 12 November 1960)

 

CAIRNES, Captain, W E P, 8 Hussars. From The Glen, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

William Edward Plunket Cairnes, gained rank of Major. Lived in Herefordshire. Son of Alan Thomas Cairnes and Julia Caroline Cairnes, Governor of the Bank of Ireland, who lived at The Glen, Drogheda. (The Peerage.com accessed July 2012)

 

CALLAGHAN, Private, JOSEPH, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

CALLAGHAN, J, London Post Office Rifles. From Broughton Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Ptes. J McEvoy and J Callaghan, P O Rifles, who formerly served on the Dundalk P O staff, and who were both extremely popular in town, are prisoners of war. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916)

 

See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers

 

CALLAN, Nurse, Eleanor.

(see below)

CALLAN, Nurse, Kathleen

Miss Eleanor Callan, daughter of the former member for Dundalk and Louth, and Miss Kathleen Callan, daughter of Mr Philip Callan, J P, Dowdstown, were both Red Cross nurses on hoard the Brittanic (sic), the big hospital ship torpedoed off the Greek coast this week. A wire from Athens to Mr Walter Callan, R M, yesterday announced that both had been saved. It is reported that Dr Kean, of Newry, who joined the Army Medical Corps some time ago, was also on the Brittanic (sic). We trust he is amongst the survivors.

(Dundalk Democrat, 11 November 1916)

           

Britannic, 48758 Gross tons. Built in 1915. Sunk on 21 November 1916 in the Aegean Sea in the Zea Channel when it struck a mine laid by the German submarine U 73 whilst on a voyage from Southampton and Naples to Mudros. 21 lost. Lost whilst on Government service employed as a Hospital Ship. (Tennent)

(The Britannic was a sister ship of the Titanic, which sank on its maiden voyage in 1912.) (DH)

1901 Census: Eleanor Callan, age 12 lived at house 9, Shanlis, Ardee. Occupation scholar. Father is Philip Callan, age 57, occupation Farmer, and mother Kate age 45. Seven other siblings resident.

1911 Census: Eleanor Callan, age 22 lived at house 10, Shanlis, Ardee. No occupation. Father is Philip Callan, age 66, occupation Farmer, and mother Kate age 54. Four other siblings resident.

 

CALLAN, Private, JAMES, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

See MELVILLE, Bombardier, JAMES

Private Jim Callan, R A M C, son of Mr Thomas Callan, The Crescent, who joined at the outbreak of the war, has been lucky enough to earn a few days respite from the fighting without having got a scratch during his 18 months on active service. He has seen the fighting at Ypres, Guillemont, Armentieres, Guinchy and Neuve Chappelle. He came from the last-named place and is returning there. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 January 1917)

 

CALLAN, JERRY H, in the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

  

CALLAN, JOHN NICHOLAS, 4076, 17 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, Age 44, born Dundalk, Co Louth. Occupation Cooper. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Patrick Dunne, 59 Cooper Street, Surry Hill, Sydney. Uncle. Enlisted 11 November 1915. Arrived in Suez 9 April 1916. In England 7 June 1916. To France 10 September 1916. To Belgium 24 September 1916. In hospital in England 21 November 1916, rheumatism. Invalided to Australia for discharge 4 May 1917, rheumatism and haemorrhoids.  Discharged 10 August 1917, medically unfit.

 

CALLAN, JOHN, Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CALLAN, JOSEPH, Royal Navy. From 3 McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). See CALLAN, Sergeant, PETER, below.

 

CALLAN, PATRICK, Royal Leinster Fusiliers (sic). ‘In training.’

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

CALLAN, Sergeant, PETER, 1 Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 3 McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

Sergeant Peter Callan, R D F, son of Mr Peter Callan, M’Dermott’s Terrace, who has been in 28 engagements from the very first battle of the war down to quite recently has been twice wounded, is home on sick leave. He saw service in France, Egypt and the Dardanelles and again in France, and has been specially commended for gallantry. He is one of three brothers all of whom are in the army. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 January 1917)

1911 Census: Peter J Callan, age 13, lived at 3 McDermotts Terrace, Dundalk. Occupation Scholar. Father Philip Callan, age 50, widower, born Co Monaghan, occupation Carpenter. Two siblings, Mary age 10 and Philip age 8 present. Four cousins also resident, no mention of Joseph Callan. .

CALLAN, Gunner, PHILIP, 28 Battalion Royal Field Artillery,  3 McDermott’s Terrace, Dundalk is also listed by Tempest’s Annual 1916. Philip Callan, 197468, Royal Garrison Artillery, from Mc Dermotts Terrace, Dundalk,  is noted to have died of malaria in Salonika on 24 October, 1918.(see The Unreturned Army p. 49)

 

CAMPBELL, Private, B. Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

6204 Bernard Campbell, Royal Irish Fusiliers, born Dundalk, Enlisted 26 August 1914. Rose Campbell, William Street, mother. Discharged 20 November 1914.

7581 Bernard Campbell, Royal Irish Rifles, from no 5 William Street,. Enlisted 24 June 1915. Served in France. Awarded  Military Medal. Discharged June 1918 for medical reasons.

Re-enlisted June 1919 in Labour Corps, no. 702883, discharged December 1919.

Census 1911: Bernard Campbell age 16, lived at house 8 Grey’s Lane, Dundalk. Occupation Messenger Boy Roman Catholic. Mother Rose, age 45. Widow. Two siblings, Peter age 14 and Thomas age 12. All born Co Louth.

 

CAMPBELL, Captain, DAVID, MC,  6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

Born in Crinstown near Ardee in 1887 into a family which farmed 60 acres. Trained as a teacher before transferring to Trinity College in 1913 where he studied religion with a view to becoming a minister in the Church of Ireland. When the war broke out in August 1914 he applied for a commission in the army. Appointed to the 6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, Campbell was shipped in August 1915 to Gallipoli. He was twice wounded on 9 August 1915. For seven hours he crawled or was carried to safety and was evacuated to the relative safety of an offshore hospital ship.   Repatriated to Britain for convalescence, was recalled to duty, eventually rejoining his battalion in Salonica in April 1916. In August 1917 his health broke down, but not before he was awarded the Military Cross for ‘distinguished service’. Repatriated again to Britain he was forced to resign his commission on health grounds in June 1918. He continued with his studies and  he became a successful civil engineer, among his projects was the construction of the Islandbridge War memorial and  Shannon Airport, and worked on Dublin and Baldonnell Airports. He died in 1971. His is one of the few reminiscences of the war published to date (2010) by a native of County Louth in Forward the Rifles,  The War Diary of an Irish Soldier 1914-1918 by Captain David Campbell, M.C. (Nonsuch publishing, Dublin 2009). DH.

1901 Census: David Campbell age 12 lived at house 20, Richardstown,  Stabannon, Co louth. Presbyterian, occupation Scholar. Elizabeth Campbell, mother, age 44, widow, born Co Cavan. Six siblings.  

1911 Census: David Campbell  age 23 boarder at house 4 Southknock, New Ross, Wexford. Occupation National School Teacher. Irish Church.

(Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CAMPBELL, Private, J, Irish Guards.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CAMPBELL,  JOHN, 2731093 Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 850 Auburn Park Blvd, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Born 15 November, 1881, Louth, Ireland. Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic. Occupation Stationary and Marine Fireman. Next-of-kin, Miss Kate Murray, c/o St Anclom Catholic Church, 61st Street and Michigan Avenue, Chicago,  Illinois,  USA, friend. Attested 7 October 1918 at Toronto, Canada.

 

CAMPBELL, Private, JOHN, 9 Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers. From Lurgankeel, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CAMPBELL, Owen. From Castlebellingham district.

(Report of meeting in Annagassan chaired by Brigadier General Edward Bellingham) He suggested that the ex-servicemen form a club to look after their interests under the new Act, or in the alternative form a branch of the Comrades of the Great War or the Discharged or Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation.

Immediately afterwards a branch of the D S and S A was formed of which the following officials were appointed – President, Jas Hosie; Treasurer, Robt. Donnan, Secretary, Owen Campbell. About 50 members were enrolled.

(Dundalk Democrat, 17 January 1920)

(Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CAMPBELL, Private, P, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

CAMPBELL, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Magdalene Street Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CAMPBELL, PATRICK, Royal Scots Fusiliers. From Lurgankeel, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CAMPBELL, THOMAS, 851087, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  325 East 39th Street, New York City, USA. Born 6 October 1896, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation,  Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin, Denis Campbell, 98 Chroda Street (sic. Probably Chord Street), Drogheda, father. Attested 31 January 1917, at Niagara Falls, Canada.  

 

CAMPBELL, W. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CARAHER, GEORGE. From Tallanstown, Co Louth. Born 1897, died 1973. Served  in Great War. (Source John B McGovern)

 

CARNEY, Sergeant, P, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

CARNEY, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer district. ‘At present in training.’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

CAROLAN, B, London Post Office Rifles. From Nicholas Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Died 30 October 1917 (see The Unreturned Army, p. 51)

1901 Census: Bernard Carolan, age 21 resident at 8 Byrne’s Row, Dundalk, Roman Catholic, occupation Rural Postman. Mother Catherine Carolan, age 40, head of household, widow.  Two siblings at same address.  

1911 Census: Bernard Carolan, age 31 lived at 25 Nicholas Street, Dundalk. Roman Catholic, occupation General Postman, head of  household. Five siblings living at same address.

 

CAROLAN, Corporal, J, Leinster Regiment. From Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 16 September 1916) (possibly CAROLAN, Corporal, JAMES, 9506, Depot Leinster Regiment. Died on Wednesday 13 November 1918. (See The Unreturned Army, p. 51).

 

CAROLAN, Lance-Corporal, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

(This or the above, or someone else,  could be the man listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CAROLAN, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 7 September 1916)

 

CAROLAN, Sergeant, M, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported missing (Dundalk Democrat, 16 September 1916)

            Killed in action 3 September 1916. See The Unreturned Army, p.51.

 

CARR, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From Nun’s Walk, Drogheda. 

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Probably James Carr age 19,  occupation Fisherman, who lived at house 10 Nun’s Walk, Drogheda. Father, Thomas Carr, age 58, widower, occupation Carter. Killed 12 May 1915. See The Unreturned Army p. 52.

 

CARR, M, Royal Naval Reserve. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CARR, M, 5 Battalion, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CARRAGHER: 2nd Lieutenant, MICHAEL, 11 Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He had served as a Private No. 26582,  in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and was then commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the 11th Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  He was a solicitor with the firm Tallons in Drogheda before and after the First World War. He lived at 1 Legavoureen Park, Drogheda. He died aged 40 on 21 November 1928 and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Drogheda. The family believed that he died from the effects of the war. (Source: James W Taylor)

 

CARROLL, Captain, DONALD, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Dundalk House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

Two young  Dundalk doctors – Dr Carroll and Dr Ward – have joined the army medical staff. They will, we fear, have no lack of practice if this war goes on for any length of time. Let us hope they will not find themselves amongst their “subjects” any of their fellow-townsmen.

(Dundalk Democrat, 10 August 1914)

 

Most Dundalk people are naturally proud of honours earned by their fellow townsmen, and in this spirit we welcome the announcement that Captain J Donal Carroll RAMC son of the late Mr V S Carroll has been awarded the Military Cross as a reward for bravery in the field. Captain Carroll has been on the war service almost from the outbreak of hostilities, having served first in the military hospitals in Malta and Gibraltar and subsequently on the battle fields in France, where he is at present. Doctors in the discharge of their merciful duties constantly incur all the risks of the fighting men, without the enthusiasm of fighting, which often carries the soldier unheeding through the horrors of the battlefield. If anything the higher honours are theirs, and it is well that these marks of appreciation are no longer withheld. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 May 1917)

(This award appears in the Medal Rolls of the National Archives, London, WO 372/4, on the record of  Captain J Donal Carroll, RAMC. DH)

           

See KIRK, Private, E S

 

1911 Census: J Donal Carroll, lived at house 1, Demesne Urban, Dundalk. Age 21, occupation Student of Medicine. Brother, James M Carroll, Head of Household, occupation Tobacco Manufacturer’s son. Five other siblings. All born Co Louth.

John Donal Carroll,  Military Cross (1917), Captain Royal Army Medical Corps, served in World War 1 with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Colonel in the Irish Free State Medical Army Service, 1922-1925. Died 16 April 1928. (Extracted from Burke’s Irish Family Records, p. 214. (1976)

 

(Award of Military Cross). Temp. Capt. John Donal Carroll, M B, RAMC, attd. R(oyal) War(wickshire) R(egiment). For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. An observation post had been hit, he immediately went to the spot and attended the wounded, although the enemy continued to concentrate heavy shellfire on the post. (Supplement to the London Gazette, 1 June 1917, p. 5987.)

 

The death is announced in Cork of Dr J D Carroll, a member of the well-known Dundalk family of tobacco manufacturers. The late Dr Carroll was a golfer of rare ability, and won the National Army championship a few years ago. The interment will take place in the family burial ground at Castletown Cemetery, Dundalk. (Irish Independent, 17 April, 1928)

 

Carroll, (Cork), April 16 , 1928, at Bon Securs Home, Cork, John Donal Carroll, M.B; B.Ch;DPH; MC, Medical Officer of Health, Cork, fourth son of the late Vincent S Carroll, Dundalk House, Dundalk, Remains will arrive Dundalk Station, by 7.45 train tomorrow (Wednesday), 18th. Solemn requiem Mass in St Patrick’s Cathedral, at 11 o’clock, Thursday next, 19th. Funeral to Castletown Cemetery immediately afterwards.

(Irish Independent, 17 April, 1928)

(For future: Irish Independent: Obit. 18th April, 1928,  Report 19th, Obsequies 20th)

 

 CARROLL, Corporal, HARRY, 8 Hussars. From 41 Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

We hear a son of the late Bandmaster J J Carroll, of Castle Road has been recommended for very heroic conduct in the field. Under fire and carrying despatches, he was wounded and the horse he was riding was killed, but he succeeded in rescuing a wounded comrade and delivering his despatches to his General, who congratulated him warmly on his bravery. His mother has had a letter from the General and Mr Carroll, we are glad to say, is fit again for duty.  (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

           

We are permitted to publish the subjoined interesting extracts from a letter written to Mrs Carroll of Castle Road (widow of the late Mr J J Carroll who was so well known in musical circles in and around this county), by her son, Harry, who is now in hospital in Belfast. His Colonel, in a personal letter to Mrs Carroll says: ‘I must write you a line just t tell you how well your son did on patrol last week.  I cannot send you details but he did extremely well. , and I know how proud and pleased Mr Carroll would be had he lived to hear about it.’ The lad’s own letter runs:

‘I had to do some very tricky work the other day; it was bringing a despatch from the front line of trenches back to the general. Well, on the way up the fellow who was with me got wounded in the knee, so I had to leave him and go on with my officer. At any rate we reached the trenches. I was not long there until I was given the despatch to bring back. On my way I came across the fellow who was wounded, so I carried him to where I had left our horses. Well, we were very fortunate to get back that far, as the ground was level and no place to take cover, and the Germans were firing at us all the time. When I got back to our horses I put the poor fellow on his horse and started to bring him back.  The Huns started firing on us with two machine guns. The poor chap was wounded again and died shortly afterwards. I turned and seeing the poor chap lying over the front of his saddle I shouted to him to hold on to his saddle, and I caught hold of his horses reins and galloped for my life.  I hadn’t gone far until my horse was shot from under me, and one of my reins cut in two by the bullets. I handed the poor fellow over to some RAMC men. When I arrived I handed the despatches over to The General. I was nearly beat. Colonel M… came over and spoke to me in front of all the other officers and said he was proud to have me as an N C O in his regiment. He also stated that he was very sorry that my father (R I P) was dead, but he said ‘Your mother is still alive and well, and I will write and tell her of your very brave deeds today.  Now I am to go back and do the same journey to the trenches again, taking another man with me. We arrived quite safe up to the trenches this time (T G). But, coming back at night the poor chap was buried with a shell and a couple of minutes after a shell burst beside me, blowing my second horse (which I was riding at the time) to pieces. All the back of my coat was blown away, but not a piece hit me, only the explosive knocked me out for about five minutes. But, my God, what a days experience. I don’t want any more days like that for a long time.  So now you can thank  all the people who have said prayers for me, and I am quite sure they have been heard above. I am back and safe from all harm now, so don’t worry. (Dundalk Democrat, 17 February, 1917.

 

1901 Census: Henry Edward Yorke Carroll, age 8  lived at 27 Castle Street. Occupation Scholar. Born Norwich, England. Attending the Barrack School inside Dundalk Cavalry Carracks.  Father, John James Carroll,  age 50, born Limerick. Occupation Bandmaster of the 8th Hussars (in Lodgings). Mother, Catherine Eliza, age 42, born Manchester, England. Four siblings, one born in Co Louth.

1911 Census: John Carroll age 60 resided at 41 Castle Street, Dundalk. Occupation, Pensioner, Retired Army Bandmaster. Born Co Limerick. Wife, Catherine E Carroll, age 52, born England. Two daughters, one born England, one born Co Louth. No sign of Harry Carroll.

 

CARROLL, Driver, G, Ambulance Column, Royal Field Artillery, Guards Division. From 5 Parks’ Court, Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CARROLL, J. From Mary Street South, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CARROLL, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Hardman’s Gardens, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CARROLL, JAMES, 5 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

           

CARROLL, Corporal, JAMES, Irish Guards. Military Medal. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Private Jas Carroll, Irish Guards, has been promoted Lance-Corporal and awarded Military Medal for bravery in the field. Carroll, whose mother resides at No 3 Mary Street (South), was, up to the outbreak of the war, employed at the GNR Works, Dundalk. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

 

CARROLL, Private, P, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

CARROLL, PAT, from Milestown. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CARROLL, Rifleman, PATRICK,  1678 Rfn Patrick, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.. Born Ardee, Co. Louth, 1893, the son of Patrick and Mary Anne Carroll née Murphy, Ardee. The 1901 Census shows his mother, a lace worker, living with her mother, Bessy Murphy, at 10 Lamb’s Lane, Ardee. Children were Peter (13), Michael (11), Patrick (9), and John (7). Enlisted in 1914. Served in France.  Discharged 1917. Service file available from Ancestor co uk. Brother of  Rifleman Peter Carroll, 6781, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, who died of wounds 1 May 1915.

 

CARROLL, PETER, in army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

CARROLL, Stoker, PETER, Transport ship Pollovan R F R. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CARROLL, Fireman, PETER, HMS Dunclutha. From Castletown Road, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

CARROLL, THOMAS, Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CARRON, EDWARD, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CARSON, Private, E H, 48 Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps. From 8 Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

See MELVILLE, Bombardier, JAMES

1901 Census: at 8 Castle Street, Edward Carson, age 4, born Co Down.  Father Joseph Carson, age 42, occupation Sergeant Major, 6th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, (Louth Militia,DH). Mother, Sarah Curran, age 35, born Canada. Two siblings.

1911 Census: at 8 Castle Street, Edward H Carson, age 14, born Co Down, occupation Scholar. Irish Church.  Father Joseph Carron, age 53,, born Co Tyrone, occupation Auctioneer. Mother Sarah Curran, age 44, born Canada.

 

CARTON, JAMES, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Barrack Street Drogheda. Served through the South African campaign.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

6656 Private James Carton. Enlisted 1899. Re-enlisted 1911. Re-enlisted28.3.1916. Next-of Kin, Mother Anne Carton, 17  Barrack Lane, Drogheda. Service file on ancestry.co.uk.

Died of wounds 17.8.1916. In The Unreturned Army

 

CARTON, MICHAEL, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Barrack Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: Anne Carton, age 40, lived at 12 Barrack Street, Drogheda. Born Co Meath. Widow. Six children, including Michael, age 10, see below. All born Co Meath.

1911 Census: Family now living at 5 Barrack Street, Drogheda. No sign of Michael.

Brother of James Carton killed in action 17 August 1916, see The Unreturned Army.  

 

CASEY, Sergeant, HUGH, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

14840 Battery Sergeant Major  Hugh Casey, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Togher, Co Louth. Served from 1896 to 1919, including France 1914-1918. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk. See Thomas Casey below.  

 

CASEY, Sergeant, J P, Motor Transport, Royal Army Service Corps. From 56 Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CASEY, JOHN, no 7234, D Company, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk

            Dundalk Man’s letter from the Front

To the editor of the Democrat

February 10, 1915.

Sir

As I am a constant reader of your paper, and have got it all along since I came out here – that will be since the beginning of the war – and all the boys here get it off me to have a read about the town and how it is getting on, and to know how the old Louth team is getting on, and they are glad to hear they are in the final of the Croke Cup. They would like to be home to see the match with Kerry and Louth; it will be a big day in Dundalk. But what they want me to write to you for is: if you would be so kind to let the people of the town know that there is up to 30 of the old town here fighting – the most of them since the start of the war- and we have proved ourselves, for our Battalion has done their share of the fighting, and we were the first that drove the Germans before us through Armentieres and have shared in all the big fights and are still in the fighting line, and we can see how much the people think of us fighting for King and country to say that we read in your paper where the 28th Brigade RFA received two halves of socks to be divided to the men, but they forgot that the Irish regiment has any men from the town. Every town in the North of Ireland has sent something to this regiment only Dundalk, but the men of Dundalk in this regiment have proved themselves here and in Africa. But we will finish, hoping the old Louth Team will have luck in winning the Cup and give Kerry a good run. We will be longing to hear the result. I can say no more. We all join in sending our best wishes to the Louth team

From 7234 John Casey, D Company, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, 4th  Division, 10th Brigade, British Expeditionary Force. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 February 1915)

 

CASEY, JOHN, 163271, Labour Battalion, Royal Engineers. From James’ Street Dundalk. Enlisted 1916. Previous service in Royal Irish Rifles. Service record available on ancestry.co.uk.  

 

CASEY, Sergeant, THOMAS, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Dunleer district. Brother of Sergeant Hugh Casey. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

CASSIDY, PETER, Leinster Regiment. From William Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CASSIDY, Quarter-Master Sergeant, T, 5 Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CHAMBERS, ERNEST. From Faughart Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CHAWNER, WILLIAM HENRY, 71242, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born Drogheda, 23 November 1893. Religious affiliation, Presbyterian.  Occupation Bank Clerk.  Next-of-kin, W J Chawner, 31 Ulsterville Gardens, Belfast, father.  Currently serving in Active Militia,  Cameron Highlanders of Canada. Attested  25 October 1914, Winnipeg, Canada.

 

CHASE, JOSHUA, Royal Engineers

Son of ex-Sergeant Chase, Marsh Road, Drogheda. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: Joshua W Chase, age 11, lived at 14 Duleek Street, Drogheda. Occupation Scholar, Church of Ireland. Son of Joshua Chase, age 39, Sergeant in Royal Irish Constabulary.  Born Co Dublin. Mother, Mary Anne Chase, age 33, born Co Louth. Six siblings.

1911 Census: family at house 4.2 Church Yard, Drogheda. Father RIC pensioner. No sign of Joshua W.

Serial No, 20169. Embarked in France 27 November 1914.

A High Court jury disagreed in an action of Peter Kirwan, fitter, Park Avenue, Marino, Dublin against Joshua Chase, Old Hill, Drogheda, for damages for injuries sustained in a car accident. (Irish Independent, 3 February, 1955)

Chase, (Drogheda) – May 17, 1983, at the Cottage Hospital, Joshua William, Old Hill, Drogheda, beloved husband of Edith, deeply regretted by his wife, sons, daughters-in-law, grandchildren, relatives and friends. Interment today (Thursday) May 19, after 2 o’c Service in St Mary’s Church, Mary Street. ‘The way thou gavest Lord, is ended.’ (Irish Independent, 19 May, 1983)

Chase, (Balbriggan), at her son’s residence, George’s Hill, Balbriggan, and late of Old Hill, Drogheda, Edith, beloved wife of the late Joshua Chase, deeply regretted by he sons, daughters in law, grandchildren, relatives and friends. Interment today(Friday) after 2 o’c Service in St Mary’s Church, Mary Street, Drogheda. (Irish Independent ,3 June 1983)

 

CHATTERTON, Miss M, Voluntary Aid Detachment. From The Crescent, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1901 Census: Mary Chatterton age 12,  lived at 15, the Crescent, Dundalk. Her father, Sinclair Chatterton, born in Dublin, age 47, County Inspector Royal Irish Constabulary. Mother Eleanora age 53, born Co Westmeath.

1911 Census: May Chatterton, age 22, born Co Westmeath, lived at 2 Mill Street, Dundalk. Her father, Sinclair Chatterton, born in Dublin, age 57, County Inspector Royal Irish Constabulary. Three siblings.

 

In the Irish Independent, 16 August 1932, there is a photograph of May Chatterton with a rally car, and the following caption ‘Miss May Chatterton, the only woman competitor  from the Free State getting ready to start from Dublin yesterday in the Northern Ireland Motor Rally to Bangor, where drivers from Ireland and Great Britain will assemble this evening.’

 

CLARE, Private, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Chord Road, Drogheda. Returned from Australia at the outbreak of the war.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Probably CLAIR, JAMES,  7927,  2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Born parish of St Peter’s Drogheda. Enlisted Royal Irish Fusiliers 25 November 1902. Served and wounded in France 1915. Discharged at the end of his period of enlistment December 1915. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk. which includes details of his emigration to Australia. A James Clare 8349, Royal Irish Rifles from Drogheda was killed in action on 10 March 1915. (See The Unreturned Army)

 1901 Census: James Clair age 18 lived at 125 Chord Road, Drogheda. Born Dublin City. Occupation General Labourer. Father Henry Clair, age 63, born Bellary, India. Mother Bridget Clair, age 49, born Co Louth, occupation General Servant.  Sister Mary Jane, age 21, born Co Louth. occupation General Servant.

1911 Census: James Clair age 28, lived at 49 Chord Road, Drogheda. Mother was now a widow, sister married to Nicholas McCann.

 

CLARKE, Drummer, -, 5 Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CLARKE, Stoker, BERNARD, HMS Woodnut, Royal Naval Reserve.  ‘Took part in the storming of the forts at the Dardanelles. His ship was knocked out of action. He is now on his Majesty’s ship Woodnut, “somewhere.”’

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CLARKE, Sergeant-Major, C, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CLARKE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

 

CLARKE, Private, JAMES, Irish Guards. From Point Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CLARKE, Private, JOSEPH, 1 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Brother of Private Thomas Clarke. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

            See Thomas Clarke below.

 

CLARKE, Private, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916).

 

CLARKE, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CLARKE, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Patrick Street, Drogheda. Reported killed at the front. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)  There are two casualties of that name from Drogheda, only one predates the report. That Patrick Clarke served in the South Lancashire Regiment, was aged 35, and was killed in September 1914. (See The Unreturned Army). The 1901 Census shows a Patrick Clarke age 21 living at 45 St Patrick Street, Drogheda, whose age corresponds with that of the fatality.  In the 1911 Census there is a Patrick Clarke age 24, lived at 44 St Patrick’s Street, Drogheda. Occupation General Dealer. Born Co Louth. Wife, Mary Kate Clarke, age 27, born Co Louth. Occupation Perl Winder.

 

CLARKE, PATRICK, from Mell, Drogheda. 567095 Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Enlisted 13 July 1915. Served in France. Wounded. Discharged 1919. Service file on ancestry.co.uk.

Father,  John Clarke 3 Simcock’s Lane, Drogheda.  

 

CLARKE, RICHARD, Irish Guards. Baker in employment of Mrs Lyons, Trinity Street. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census:  Richard Clarke, age 12, lived at 12 Platin Road, Drogheda. Roman Catholic. Born Co Meath. Occupation Scholar. Son of Thomas Clarke, age 39, occupation General Labourer, born Co Meath, and Amy Clarke, age 38, born Co Meath. Two siblings.

1911 Census: Richard Clarke, age 22, lived at 17 Duleek Street West, Drogheda. Roman Catholic. Born Co Louth. Occupation Baker. Son of Thomas Clarke, age 50, occupation General Labourer, born Co Louth, and Ann Clarke, age 49. Two siblings.

 

Enlisted 17 February 1915. Royal Irish Fusiliers. 18108 and Labour Corps 228208 . Served in Balkans. Wounded. Discharged 7 March 1918. Very badly damaged service file on ancestry.co.uk.

 

CLARKE, Private, T, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916) possibly the same as the following entry.

 

CLARKE, Rifleman, THOMAS, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Brother of Private Joseph Clarke. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: Thomas Clarke, age 9 and Joseph Clarke, age 7,  lived at 10 Crooked Street, Drogheda. Both Scholars. Both born Co Louth. Joseph Clarke, age 32, father, occupation Baker, born Co Louth. Mary Jane Clarke age 30, mother, born Co Louth. Four other siblings. 

1911 Census: Thomas Clarke, age 19 and Joseph Clarke, age 17,  lived at 2 Watery Hill, Drogheda. Occupations, Bakers Apprentice, and Messenger Boy respectively. Both born Co Louth. Mary Jane Clarke age 42, mother, married, Head of Household, born Co Louth. Four other siblings. 

 

CLELAND, Private, T.

The war has killed poets, not a few, Tom Kettle; and Francis Ledwidge, the young peasant-poet of Slane, whose death is announced this week. God rest them! We don’t suppose the writer of the subjoined lines has any ambition to rank with either, but he has a pretty gift of parody, which is not at all a bad thing. He writes from ‘Macedonia, July 18, ‘ To the editor of the Democrat

Dear Sir – Will you kindly find space in your paper to insert these few lines, parody on ‘My little Grey Home in the West’ written and composed by 3486 Pte. T Cleland, Salonica Forces, Salonica, and oblige. Hoping the boys of the ‘wee’ county who are out doing their bit are all in the pink – I remain yours sincerely, 3486

 Pte T Cleland.

 

Parody on My Little Grey Home in the West

 

When the blooming war spreads in the East

And our feet with long marches are sore,

And the road that’s seemed long to the lilt of our song

Seems much longer than ever before,

Far ahead where Jack Johnsons fall

We find no contentment or peace

And the coils of barbed wire must be laid under fire

In our deep little trench in the East

 

When our infantry makes an attack,

And the Bulgars are soon on their track,

You run onto a wire under infantry fire

With a telephone slung on your back;

When the Bulgars they look in their rear

And find you’ve telephone gear,

And the shells they fall near, but we have got no fear

In our deep little trench in the East. T Cleland.

(Dundalk Democrat, 11 August 1917)

3486 Private Thomas Cleland, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Awarded a Victory Medal and British War Medal. (UK National Archives, WO 372/4/872547). Can’t be identified on census, however there is no one of that surname in Co Louth in the 1901 or 1911 Census. No 3846 T Cleland, Royal Irish Fusiliers, reported to be from Ardee was reported wounded , Irish Independent 3 August 1916. (The serial no is probably a misprint, 3846 Royal Irish Fusiliers was a Private Patrick Donaghy)

 

CLIFF, Miss M, Voluntary Aid Detachment. From Fane Valley, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).  Marion Cliff, awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. (UK National Archives, WO/372/23). See also  next entry.

 

CLIFF, Lieutenant, WILLIAM McCULLOUGH, 3 Hussars. From Fane Valley, Dundalk. (TA1916). Later Captain No 3 Rest Camp.

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

1901 Census: William McCullough Cliff age 9 lived at house 4 Kilcurley, Co Louth. Born in England. Mother Marion, born in Australia, age 32. Sister Marion age 8.

1911 Census: family at 8 Allardstown, Co Louth. Harold Cliff, age 48, born England, occupation Major, retired pay. Marion Watt Cliff, wife age 43, and Anne, daughter, age 7, born Australia. No sign of William or Marion jnr.

 

Lieutenant Colonel Harold Cliff died 1 February 1917 as a result of wounds received in Gallipoli, in 1915. (see The Unreturned Army)

 

CLIFFORD, Private, C, Royal Irish Fusiliers.  Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLIFFORD, Private, E, Royal Irish Rifles. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLIFFORD, EDWARD, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLIFFORD, Private, JAMES, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 10 Broughton Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1911 Census, James Clifford, age 14, lived at 10 Broughton Street, Dundalk. Born Co Louth. Occupation Scholar. Father Patrick Clifford, age 58, born Co Carlow. Occupation Machinest. Mother, Sarah Jane, age 50, born Co Fermanagh. Seven siblings.

 

CLIFFORD, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLIFFORD, JOHN, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Burn’s Row, Bridge Street, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CLIFFORD, JOHN, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLIFFORD, PETER, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CLINTON-WALSH, Private, THOMAS, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CLUSKEY, F, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1911 Census, Francis Cluskey lived at 17 Scarlet Street, Drogheda. Age 27, occupation House Painter. Born Co Meath. Father, Micholas Cluskey, age 73, Gardener. Born Co Meath. Three siblings all born Co Louth.

 

CLUSKEY, Private, JAMES, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 1 New Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

CLUSKEY,  NATHANIEL, 437435, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born  Co Louth, 26 December 1887. Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic. Occupation Teamster. Next-of-kin Nathaniel Cluskey,  Ardee, Co Louth, father.  Attested 16 June 1915, Edmonton, Canada.

 

CLUSKEY, PETER, 7940, Royal Irish Rifles and 3552 Royal Army Medical Corps.. Born Dundalk. Enlisted 9 September 1902. Mobilized August 1914. Served in France 1914-1915.  Discharged at end of period of enlistment 1915. Service file available on ancestor.co.uk Next of kin, Patrick Cluskey, 13 Anne Street, Dundalk.

1911 Census: Peter Cluskey age 33 lived at 49 Anne Street, Dundalk. Occupation General Labourer. Born Co Louth. Father, Patrick Cluskey, age 74, occupation Army Pensioner Infantry. Born Co Louth. Mother Mary Anne, age 67, born Co Meath. Three siblings.

 

COBURN, Corporal, L, 2 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From 15 Brook Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). See T Coburn below. See next entry

 

COBURN, T. From 15 Brook Street, Dundalk. Invalided. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

1911 Census, Thomas Coburn lived at 15 Brook Street, Dundalk, age 18. Born Co Louth. Occupation General Labourer. Father Patrick age 58, born Co Louth, occupation Mason. Mother, Annie, age 57, born Co Louth. Four siblings, including Michael L, possibly L Coburn listed above.

 

COLBOURNE, Quarter-Master Sergeant, F G, Royal Irish Regiment.

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I,  JODS 2000)

 

COLEMAN, P, in army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

COLGAN, Private, S, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Ardee. Reported  wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916). Killed in action 29 April,1916. See The Unreturned Army

 

COLKIN, Corporal, C, Connaught Rangers, 3 Lahore Division.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, - , Leinster Regiment. From Trinity Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, C W. From 49 Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

COLLINS, CHARLES, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

COLLINS, J, Royal Marines. Prisoner of War.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, Private, JAMES, 4723, Connaught Rangers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, Private, JOHN, 2294, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

In France 23 December 1914. (UK National Archives Medal Card Index WO/372/4/924864)

 

COLLINS, Private, JOSEPH, 31 Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

COLLINS, M, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, Private, PATRICK, 1868, Irish Guards.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COLLINS, WILLIAM, from Tullyallen, Drogheda. 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Enlisted 1898. Served in France 1914. Prisoner of War 1914-1918. Service record available on ancestry.co.uk.

 

COMMONS, JAMES, 65195, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 31 December 1870, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic. Occupation Steam Fitter. Next-of-kin Michael Commons, 97 Scarlett Street, Drogheda, Co Louth, brother.  Previous military experience, nineteen years and six months in Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Fought in South Africa. Attested on 20 November 1914 at Montreal.

 

COMMONS, WILLIAM, 435465, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address Clearing Depot Quebec, Canada. Born 1`7 December 1893, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic. Occupation indecipherable.  Next-of-kin, James Commons, British Expeditionary Force, (Belgium?). Attested  25 June, 1915 at Calgary, Alberta, Canada.  (William Commons appears to be the son of James Commons above. According to the Royal Iniskilling Fusiliers service records of James Commons, William Albert Commons was born in Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire, England  on  17 December 1893.

 

CONACHY, Private, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Louth, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CONACHY, Private, JAMES,17959 Royal Irish Rifles, 05577 Hampshire Regiment and 88642 Royal Defence Corps.  James was born May 20, 1878.  He married Ann Woods on April 12 1904. First theatre of war was in the Balkans from 21 July 1915.  He died September 12, 1946 and is buried in St Mary’s Abbey cemetery in Ardee.  (Source: Paul Mazouat)

 

CONACHY, PETER, from Milestown. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CONACHY, PHILIP, Royal Navy. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CONACHEY, Private, P Augustine, Royal City of London Fusiliers. From Chapel Street, Dundalk. Prisoner of war. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Pte P A Conachey, whose address is given as Co. Louth, is included in the list of those recruited by the German Government as being prisoners of war and wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

1901 Census: Patk A Conachey, age 6 lived at 5 Chapel Lane, Dundalk. Born Co Louth. Father , Patrick Conachey, age 47, occupation Draper Retired. Born Co Louth. Mother, Nannie Conachie, age 46, occupation Music Teacher. Three siblings all born Co Louth.

 

CONAGHEY, PATRICK, HMS Warspite, Royal Navy. From North Road, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CONATY, LOUIS, possibly from Co Down. Described as ex-soldier. (Dundalk Democrat, 25 November, 1922)

(During a Civil War ambush) at Essexford (Co. Louth), Volunteer Louis Conaty of Ballykelly was shot in the head and died in hospital in Dundalk on 23 November (1922). Five other soldiers and their officer, Lieutenant Commandant Smith were injured, Smith receiving a gunshot wound in the eye. At the Essexford ambush, the soldiers were severely incapacitated by the force of a landmine explosion, and were unable to return fire. The Irregulars overran their position and relieved them of their guns, ammunition and equipment. They left with a warning that ‘for every man executed in Dublin, twelve men of the Free State army would fall in reprisal’. It was also reported that the Irregulars left field dressings, and called on houses nearby requesting that assistance should be given to the wounded soldiers. (Source: Unpublished PhD by Donal Hall)

 

CONLON, JAMES

The nightly shelter of the casual ward served him for the past few weeks. Hearing he was a soldier who had lost an eye at Gallipoli and was now invalided off the Army, the Drogheda Guardians decided to offer him the hospitality of the body of the house for the next fortnight. The man referred to as James Conlon, who fought the Turks until he was disabled. Then he was discharged medically unfit, but allowed a pension of 25s a week which he enjoyed in his native Drogheda till nearly two months ago. Called at that time before a medical board for examination, his pension was reduced by 12s 6d but since the date of the reduction not a penny of allowance has the man received. The Guardians are now bringing the scandal before the Army Authorities, and it is to be hoped that the unfortunate Conlon will be in more congenial surroundings before the next two weeks have passed away. (Drogheda Advertiser, 14 October 1916)

 

CONNELL, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers

 

CONNELAN, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

CONNOLLY, ANDREW, from  Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CONNOLLY, JAMES, Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CONNOLLY, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (There are two John Connolly’s listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CONNOLLY, PATRICK, 2795, 49 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda, Co Louth, age 36 years. Occupation Labourer.  Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Mrs A Reilly, 14 Ships Street, Drogheda, sister.  Original  next-of-kin , deleted, was shown as  Rev. Mother Charles, Sacred Heart Convent, Innisfail, Queensland, Australia.  Had been convicted by Civil Power for drunkenness. Previous military experience, seven years in Irish Fusiliers, 2 years three months in South Africa (Boer War). Enlisted 11 June 1915. 13 August 1915, absent without leave. Awarded  48 hours detention and forfeited 2 days pay. 23 August 1915,(1) Conduct to the prejudice of good order & military discipline (2) Drunkenness. Awarded 4 days detention.  Embarked troopship Aryshire  3 September 1915. On board 9 September 1915, charged with conduct prejudicial to good order and discipline. Reprimanded and disciplined. At Heliop, 30 October 1915, admitted to hospital septic leg 29 April 1916. Proceeded to British Expeditionary Force , disembarked Marseilles, France, 12 June 1916. Injury to eye in the field, 2 September 1916. Note ‘Special Hospital Admin wound to eye, alleged to have been self inflicted. This man will not be brought to trial. No evidence to justify him being found guilty of self inflicted wound. Statement forwarded for record. ‘ To hospital in England 12 December 1916, bronchitis, contacted in the Somme, France.  Absent without leave, 6 March 1917 to 8 March 1917 (3 days). Admonished. Medical report  dated 19 March 1917 gave his actual age as 47 years (he was in fact ten years older than the age claimed at enlistment)  and was also suffering from the affects of senility as well as bronchitis, and in the war gratuity schedule there is mention of a gunshot would in the left foot.  Embarked for Australia 8 April 1917. Discharged 21 July 1917. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

CONNOLLY, PAUL, 2 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From ‘North Star’ (hotel) Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CONNOLLY, ROBERT, Royal Army Service Corps. From Mill Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: Robert Connolly, age 7, lived at 18 Mill Lane, Drogheda. Born Drogheda. Presbyterian. Father Charles Connolly, age 41, Occupation  Accountant Trade Manager. Born City of Dublin. Mother, Emily C Connolly, age 40, born Co Waterford. Seven siblings.

1911 Census: Robert Connolly, age 17,  lived as a boarder at 52 Castle Street, Dundalk, in the house of George Williamson, Stationers Manager.

 

CONNOR, Private, JOSEPH, 2550, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bachelor’s Lane, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CONWAY, JOSEPH. 4692, Royal Irish Rifles. Born Dundalk. Enlisted 5 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, (Special Reserve) 1909. Mobilised August 1914. In France ,June 1915. Discharged 1916. Service file available of ancestry.co.uk

 

CONWAY, Sergeant, FRED, Rough Rider, Transport Department. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

COOGAN, Bombardier, JOHN, Royal Field Artillery. From Oldbridge, Drogheda. Served in India and through South African War.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COOK, H, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

COOK, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

COOKE, HECTOR, South Irish Horse

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: Hector Cooke, age 20, born Co Leitrim, occupation Clerk. Presbyterian, Lived as a boarder at 104 Grosvenor Place, Rathmines, Dublin. No sign in 1911 Census

 

COOKE, Lieutenant, JOHN A, 10th Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers

1901 Census: John Anthony Cooke age 22, lived at house 49.3, Polbwee, Navan, Co Meath. Born Dublin City. Church of Ireland. Occupation Bank Accountant.

1911 Census: John Anthony Cooke, age 32, born Dublin City. Lived at 6 The Allies, Fairgate, Drogheda. Occupation Bank Cashier. Mother, Dora Jane, age 52, born England. One sibling.

 

COOKE,2/ Lieutenant, R H de B, 3rd Divisional Training Royal, then Lieutenant 6th Divisional Supply Column, Royal Army Service Corps. Son of Mrs Cooke, St Peters. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

Richard Hans de Brabant Cooke, Royal Army Service Corps. Awarded the 1915  Star serving on the Western Front 15 February 1915. Also awarded Victory Medal and British War Medal. (UK National Archives WO 372/4/961077)

Possibly on 1901 Census as pupil of Drogheda Grammar School,  age 15, born Dublin City. (Return difficult to decipher).

1911 Census: shown as boarding  at 54 Hanover Street, Portadown Urban, Co Armagh, age 25, occupation Clergyman, Church of Ireland Curate , Boarder,

Graduate of Trinity College, ordained 1910, Curate of Portadown Parish 1910 (James B Leslie, Armagh Clergy and Parishes).  He was gazetted, described as a Cadet or ex-Cadet of the Officer Training Corps, as Second Lieutenant on 3 November 1914 (London Gazette, 10 November 1914).

No 6 Division Supply Column, 1st Anzac Corps, Mentioned in Despatches, ‘Exceptional devotion to duty in the supply work at Railheads, especially on long stretches of continuous night work’. 4 March 1917.

 

COOKE, SHIRLEY, South African Horse. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

COOKE, S J, Royal Irish Fusiliers

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

COOMBES, Private, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

1911 Census: There is a James Coombes aged 13 living at house 13 Plattin Road, Drogheda. Born Co Meath. Father, Walter, age 35 born England, occupation Farm Labourer. Mother, Mary, age 38, born England.

 

COONEY, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles. From Blackbull. Joined on 31 December 1914. Member of B Company Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). Could be the same person as the following entry.

 

COONEY, Lance-Sergeant, PATRICK, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Blackbull, Drogheda. Enlisted in December (1915?).

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

DCM for Drogheda Soldier – Lance-Sergeant P Cooney, R I F (sic) who is a native of Blackbull, Drogheda, has been awarded the D C M for gallant conduct on the Field last January. (Drogheda Independent, 7 April 1917)

(There is no record on the relevant Medal card held in the UK National Archives of a Distinguished Service Medal having been awarded to  2649 Patrick Cooney).

 

Since the outbreak of the war, Drogheda men have played a distinguished part in the fray, and wherever the shots and shells were flying a Drogheda man was invariably to the fore. The latest recipient pf honour is Lance-Sergeant P Cooney, 7th Royal Irish Rifles, whose parents reside at Blackbull, Drogheda. He headed a party that raided a German Trench on the night of the 4th January, and succeeded in turning the Germans out. He was the first non-commissioned officer of the battalion who succeeded in ‘getting there first,’ and as a consequence the following letter has been received from Major-General Hickie, the gallant Commander of the Irish Division:-

The Irish Brigade

No 2649, L/Sgt P Cooney, 7th Royal Irish Rifles.

I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental Commander and Brigade Commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on January 4, 1917, and have ordered that your name and deed to be entered in the Record of the Irish Division.

W B Hickie, Major General, Commanding 16th Irish Division.

(Drogheda Argus, 7 April 1917)

           

Was a very quiet day. A very fine raid was made by the Battalion consisting Captain Scollard taking command, 2nd Lieut H Boyle, 2nd Lieut M Hartery and Capt Barnett. The raiding parties (three in all) got into the trench about 3 a.m. and taking the enemy by surprise, inflicted great casualties to them. All our parties returned about 3.45 am, having only two men wounded. We came out of the line into Div Reserve Locre arriving at 2.30 pm.’

(War Diary, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, 4 January 1917)

 

CORBALLY, EDWARD, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). See Philip Corbally below.

 

CORBALLY, PHILIP, 115998, Royal Engineers.  from Patrick Street, Drogheda. Enlisted August 1915. Served in France.  Discharged April 1916. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1901 Census: Philip Corbally, age 32,  lived at 8 Horse Lane, Drogheda. Occupation General Labourer. Wife Elizabeth, age 28. Five children, including Edward age 3, who may be the Edward Corbally noted above.

1911 Census: Family lives at 38 Mell, Drogheda. Eight Children. Philip now 50 has aged 18 years in the ten years since 1901, and Elizabeth now 45 has aged 17 years in the same period. Edward now  aged 14.

 

CORBALLY, T, Leinster Regiment. From Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

4896 Thomas Corbally, Pte, 1 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Address Upper Patrick Street, Drogheda. Enlisted 19 August 1914. Served in France 1915, and Salonika and Egypt 1915-1919. Discharged 26 March 1919. Discharge papers available on ancestry.co.uk.

 

CORCORAN, FRANCIS JOSEPH,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born12 July 1878,  Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation, Roman Catholic.  Occupation Telegraphist and Bridge Builder. Next-of-kin, James Corcoran, 20 James’ Street, Drogheda , father. Attested  21 January 1915, Ottawa, Canada.

 

CORCORAN, Second Lieutenant, JOSEPH, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From James’ Street Drogheda.

Mr Joseph Corcoran, of James’ Street Drogheda, who was a well known provincial journalist, and a familiar figure at coursing meetings throughout the country, has been gazetted a Second Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles , at present stationed in Dublin.

(Irish Independent 15 October 1915.)

 

Sec. Lt. Joseph Corcoran (3rd R I Rifles), of James’ Street., Drogheda, was married on Wednesday last (with Nuptial Mass) at the Pro Cathedral Dublin, to Elizabeth, elder daughter of the late Inspector Lynam (DMP). Lieut. Corcoran is a well known figure at Irish racing and coursing meetings.

(Drogheda Independent, 12 February 1916)

2/Lt Joseph Corcoran served in India during the war. (UK National Archives Medal Index WO 372/5/24563)

1901 Census: Joseph Corcoran lived at 23es Street, Drogheda, age 12. Father, John Corcoran, age 60. Occupation Railway Checker. Mother, Mary E Corcoran, age 50. Four siblings.

1911 Census: Joseph who should be aged 22, not apparent. All siblings present in order of age,  John Joseph is shown as aged 31. Father, John, now a widower, had aged 20 years in the intervening decade.

 

CORKINDALE, MICHAEL, 2305B, 12 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, age 44 years and 9 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation Ship Rigger. Next-of-kin, Ann E  Corkindale, c/o  Miss Connellyn, Alexander Hotel, Hobart, Tasmania, sister.  Previous military service, 7 years in Cameron Highlanders.  Enlisted 22 September 1916. Arrived in England 28 December 1916.  To France 23 May 1917. Wounded in action Belgium, 19/20 September 1917. Wounded again gunshot wound right leg, 30 October 1917, Belgium. To hospital  in England, 5 November 1917. Notifications to next-of-kin returned  undelivered. Returned to Australia for discharge 12 May 1918. Discharged 13 September 1918. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal. Letter from Pte Corkindale, R.S.A. Rooms, Geelong,  17 August 1920 enquiring as to the whereabouts of two kitbags.

 

CORRIGAN, Sergeant, 1506, JAMES FRANCIS. 3rd Reinforcements, 13 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force.  Age 25, Born Drogheda Co Louth. Roman Catholic. Occupation Sailor. Next-of-kin, Charles P Corrigan, 8 Burdell Buildings, Westminster Bridge Road, London, England.  Enlisted 7 November, 1914, at Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia.   Served in Gallipoli in 1915. In England by January 1916. June 27, 1916 admitted to hospital in Rollestone, England,  Synovitis of the knee. The following puzzling statement is on his file; 

A.I.F.  13 B.  MED

James Corrigan.   ?? Corrigan James. 1506    Unoff. M.  26/1/16

I knew James Corrigan his number is 1506 and I saw him last on Monday week 28th July 1916 at Rolleston Camp Salisbury Plain. He was then quite all right.  I am perfectly certain   it was James Corrigan and the camp records will show that he was then in camp. I remember his being unofficially missing  for a short time in January. There was no man of the name Corrigan James in the batt.

Ref. Corp. R.J. Newton   1587, D Coy

Confirmed by Sgt. W. Parsonage , 552 D Coy also by Pte S J Lewis  526 D Coy and by Sgt J Bailey C Coy.  4 A.D.D.B. Etaples  3.8.16.

Court-martialled on 2 August 1916, but papers no longer on file.  Invalided to home, Australia 13 February 1917., and discharged 11 May 1917. Re-enlisted 11 October 1917, no 3380. 18th Infantry Depot Battalion. Next-of-kin, Mrs Rose McAlpine, Burdette Buildings, Westminster Bridge Road, London, sister. Previous service stated and reason for discharge “temporarily unfit”. Promoted to Sergeant 16 November 1917.  Charged with drunkenness,  26 October 1917, reprimanded.  Absent from guard, without leave 18-19 Nov 1917, forfeit 2 days pay and reprimanded.  Four more periods of absences without leave in January and February 1918. Sgt Corrigan reduced to Private 20 March 1918.   Discharged 26 April 1918 as medically unfit, not due to misconduct. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. Died on 4 March 1939.

 

CORRIGAN, Sergeant, FRANCIS, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) (See Thomas Corrigan )

 

CORRIGAN, Gunner, JOHN, Field Telephone Section, Royal Field Artillery. From Townrath, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CORRIGAN, Private, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) (see also Francis Corrigan)

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat,11 November 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

1901 Census: Thomas J Corrigan lived at 16 Ladywell Terace, Dundalk. Age 4. Francis Corrigan is aged 6. Father, Owen Corrigan, age 40, occupation Iron Plainer at Railway Works. Mother Catherine age 37. Six siblings.

1911 Census: Catherine, age 48,  head of household and a widow.  Thomas James is 14, Francis is 16, both Labourers in Pork Factory. Three remaining siblings.

 

CORRY, Private, JOHN, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. From Bachelors’ Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

CORRY, Private, WILLIAM, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bachelors’ Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

COSGROVE, JOHN, Canadian Contingent. Son of Mrs Cosgrove, formerly of Duke Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COSTELLO, Lieutenant, - , Royal Flying Corps. From St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

We regret to hear that Lieut. Costello, RFC, son of Mrs Costello, Dundalk, met with an accident while flying in England this week and is suffering from very serious injuries. Prior to his joining the Flying Corps, Lieut. Costello held a responsible post in the Dundalk Electric Station. We hope soon to have news of his convalescence. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

           

We are glad to hear that Lieut Costello RFC is now rapidly recovering from the effects of his recent accident, which at one time it was feared would prove fatal. His youthful vitality and a fine unimpaired constitution pulled him through. He fell fully a thousand feet, and that he escaped instant death is nothing short of a miracle. (Dundalk Democrat, 11 November 1916)

 

COULTER, Captain, ROBERT J, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

COURTNEY,  JOHN, 2348, 10 Battalion, 8 Reinforcements, Australian Imperial Force,. Born Blackrock, Louth, Ireland.  Age 29. Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin, Patrick Courtney, 156 Oliva Street, Bootle,  Liverpool. England, brother.  Previous conviction by Civil Power, Deserted from Merchant Ship (21 days). Enlisted 31 March 1915. Charged with being absent without leave 20 July 1915 to 2 August 1915. Admonished, forfeited 13  days pay. To Egypt,  26 August 1915. Returned to Australia 21 February 1916, discharged 12 June 1916, medically unfit, rheumatism. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

COYLE, MICHAEL, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

COX, Sapper, R DUNCAN, 129 Field Company, Royal Engineers. From Lisnawilly, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)   Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

COX, Captain, ROBERT, Royal Army Medical Corps, Curragh Flying Corps. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

COX, Major, STAFFORD, Royal Army Medical Corps in Malta. From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Captain Ward, RAMC, was home this week on a brief furlough and has gone back on duty. He is now attached to a Hussar regiment as regimental surgeon. Captain S M Cox RAMC who has been in Malta all winter along with Captain Lavery, is home on leave. Our doctors are doing their bit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: Stafford M Cox, age 35, born Co Louth, lived at 11 Roden Place, Dundalk. Occupation Physician and Surgeon. Widower. No sign on 1911 census.

 

CRAIG, DENIS A, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 12 Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917) Lance-corporal (Tempest’s Annual 1918). See Michael A Craig and Thomas V Craig. .

1911 Census: Denis A Craig, age 15, lived at 12 Seatown, Dundalk, occupation Commercial Clerk Brewery. Born Antrim, Father, Hugh Craig, age 54, born Donegal. Occupation Head Constable, RIC, Superannuated. Mother Mary J Craig, age 48, born Co Louth..Seven siblings.

 

CRAIG, ERIC. From Faughart, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CRAIG, Second Lieutenant, FREDERICK W, 10 Battalion South Lancashire Regiment. From The Towers (Point Road) Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1911 Census: Fred W Craig lived at1 Point,  Dundalk, age 22 born Co Louth. Presbyterian. Occupation Draper and Outfitter. Father, Thomas Craig, age 51, born Co Louth, occupation Draper and Outfitter. Mother, Marie L Craig, born Co. Down. One sibling.

The Craig family ran a large shop in Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk. It was subjected to a sectarian attack in 1920 purportedly in retaliation for attacks on Roman Catholics in Ulster. Four members of staff who were resident were killed.  The attack was condemned by all sides of the community, and the local commander of the IRA, James McGuill, in breach of security procedures for that organisation, attended a public meeting at which members of the security forces were present, and disassociated the IRA from any involvement. (Unpublished PhD by Donal Hall)

 

CRAIG, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916 and Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

CRAIG, MICHAEL A, Royal Irish Regiment. From 12 Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918). See Denis A Craig, and Thomas V Craig.

1911 Census: Michael A Craig, age 10, lived at 12 Seatown, Dundalk, occupation Scholar. Born Antrim, Father, Hugh Craig, age 54, born Donegal. Occupation Head Constable, RIC, Superannuated. Mother Mary J Craig, age 48, born Co Louth. Seven siblings.

 

CRAIG, Private, PETER, 3 Battalion, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CRAIG, RAY. From Faughart, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

CRAIG, THOMAS V, North Irish Horse. From 12 Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918). See Denis A Craig and Michael A Craig.

1911 Census: Thomas V Craig, age 12, lived at 12 Seatown, Dundalk, occupation Scholar. Born Antrim, Father, Hugh Craig, age 54, born Donegal. Occupation Head Constable, RIC, Superannuated. Mother Mary J Craig, age 48, born Co Louth. Seven siblings.

 

CRAIG, Private, T, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 3 June 1916).

 

CRAIG, WILLIAM JOHN, 2260305, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address General Delivery, Winnipeg.  Born 9 September 1878, Co Louth. Religious affiliation, Church of England.  Occupation Railroading Man (sic). Next-of-kin Mrs Stephenson Walsh, Alberta, Canada, sister. Attested 19 February 1917 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

 

CRANSTON, WILLIAM, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CRAUGHWELL, T, London Post Office Rifles. From Carrick Road, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

See MONTGOMERY, G J, Postal Section, Royal Engineers.

1901 Census: Thomas Craughwell, aged 3, born Co louth, lived at 9 Chapel Lane, Dundalk. Father, Richard Craughwell, age 36, born Co Wicklow, occupation Carpenter. Mother, Mary Craughwell, age 29, born Co Monaghan. One sibling.

1911 Census: Thomas Craughwell now aged 14, occupation scholar, lived at 46 Hill Street, Dundalk, with parents and four siblings.

 

CRAVEN, T, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CRAVEN, Private, JOHN, Royal Army Service Corps. From Waterlodge, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

CREAN, Lieutenant, Richard.

Lieut. Dick Crean, formerly of the Great Northern Accountancy Department, has been on leave in Dundalk for a few days back and looks fit and well. He returned to duty on yesterday. He was in the big move on the Somme, but, like everybody else who has gone through these experiences, he is very reticent about it. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 December 1916)

1911 Census: Richard Francis Crean boarded at 14 Bayview, Pembroke East, Dublin. Born Co Tipperary, age 26, occupation Railway Clerk, Great Northern Railway.

 

CREASER, Staff Surgeon, THOMAS, Royal Navy. Promoted after 7 years service, son of Mr Creaser, Drogheda. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000). See George Creaser below.

 

CREASER,GEORGE, Royal Field Artillery. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: George Creaser age 4 and Thomas Creaser age 18, both born Co Louth, lived at 4 The Mall, Drogheda. Father, Thomas Creaser, age 54, occupation builder. Mother, Margaret Creaser, age 40. Two other siblings. All Methodists.

1911 Census: George Creaser lived at 1 The Mall, place of birth noted as Co Dublin. Father and one sister present. Occupation scholar.

 

CREEGAN, JOHN, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk.

We are sorry to hear that Mr John Creegan, who joined the Pals Battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers a year or so ago, and has been in France for some months, is lying very ill in hospital. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

Possibly 25926 Royal Dublin Fusiliers,400384  Labour Corps.

 

CREIGHTON, Second-Lieutenant, J L, 5 Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Hemingway House, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1901 Census: John Leslie Creighton, age 7, lived at 109 Barrack Street, Dundalk.  Occupation Scholar. Born Co Louth. Presbyterian.  Father, Joseph Creighton, age 42, occupation Storekeeper Railway. Born Co Monaghan. Mother Elizabeth age 39. Six  siblings.  

1911 Census: John Leslie Creighton, age 17, lived at 9 Mounthamilton, Dundalk. Occupation Clerk to hardware merchant. Born Co Louth. Presbyterian.  Father, Joseph Creighton, age 52, occupation Clerk on railway. Born Co Monaghan. Widower.  Eight siblings.  

 

CRILLY, Private, A, 7466, 8 Battalion Lancashire Regiment. Prisoner of War.

See BENNETT, Private, P

 

CRILLY, THOMAS, 12783, Baker, Royal Army Service Corps. From Rath, Dunleer. Co Louth. Originally enlisted in 1896. Served in Boer War in South Africa and in Great War in France and East Africa. Discharged 1918. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

 

CRINLLY (CRILLY?),  PATRICK, Active in British Legion in Dundalk and negotiated with Irish Sailors and Soldiers Trust on behalf of tenants of the Trusts houses in Dundalk.

 

CRONIN,  CORNELIUS,  400974, 33 Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born  26 March, 1892, Co Louth, 26 March 1892.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Occupation Sailor. Attested 29 May 1915, London (Ontario). Next-of-kin Mrs Theresa  Marmion (possibly,  surname virtually indecipherable), Kilkerry (sic) (Kilcurry probably), Co Louth, sister. Attested 29 May 1915, London, Ontario, Canada.

 

CROSSAN, PATRICK. From Dublin Street, Dundalk.

Kate Crossan, Dublin Street, Dundalk, sued James J Kelly, agent for the London and Provincial Assurance Co., Ltd, for £28 18s, amount due on a policy of insurance on her husband Patk. Crossan

Mr Kerley for plaintiff and Mr Lardner, B L (instructed by Mr Johnston) for defendants.

Plaintiff’s case was that she insured her husband with the defendant company. She learned subsequently that the policy did not apply to accidents to members of the naval or military authorities, and was about to discontinue the premiums when she was assured by Mr Nugent, the superintendent, that payment would be made on account of any accident to the insured person. On this understanding she continued to make payments. Her husband was wounded in battle and lost an eye, but defendants claimed that the policy did not apply to combatants.

The defence was that in the proposal the insured person was stated to be a labourer, whereas he was at the time a soldier and the injury suffered by him was not an accident.

His Honor said he would consider his decision.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915)

 

CULHANE, Captain, J M, 14 Battalion, Royal Welsh Regiment.

Lieutenant J M Culhane, AVC, 14th Welsh Regiment, son of Mr P J Culhane, Riverside House, North Strand, Drogheda, serving with the British Expeditionary Force in France, was promoted Captain on 11 August 1916.

(Drogheda Independent, 9 September 1916)

 

CULLEN, Private, WALTER, Irish Guards. From Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

1901 Census: Walter Cullen age 4, lived at 4 Chapel Lane, Dundalk. Occupation Scholar. Born Co Louth. Father, Peter Cullen, age 29, born Scotland. Occupation Tobacco Spinner. Mother, Mary Anne Cullen, age 30, born Co Cavan.  Two siblings.

1911 Census: Walter Cullen age 15, lived at 4 Chapel Lane, Dundalk. Occupation Scholar. Born Co louth. Father, Peter Cullen, age 44, born Co Louth. Occupation Tobacco Spinner. Mother, Mary Anne Cullen, age 40, born Co Louth Three siblings. (Note disparities between Censns’ Returns)

 

CULLIGAN, JOHN, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

CULLIGAN, Private, M, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 September 1916)

3/11711 Michael Culligan, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Enlisted 22 August 1914. Served with British Expeditionary Force in France 1915-1918. Wounded four occasions.

Prisoner of war 1918, interned in Switzerland, repatriated December 1918. Discharged 1919. Service and pension file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1901 Census: Michael Culligan age 9 lived at 2 Williamstown, Castlebellingham. Born Co Louth. Occupation Scholar. Father, James Culligan age 49, occupation Ploughman. Mother, Mary Culligan, age 44. Six siblings.

1911 Census: Michael Culligan age 19, lived at 2 Williamstown, Castlebellingham. Born Co louth. Occupation Farm Labourer. Father, James Culligan age 68, occupation Ploughman. Mother, Mary Culligan, age 55. Two siblings. Note discrepancy in father’s age.

 

CUMISKEY, Sergeant, - , 5 Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CUMMINS, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CUMMINGS, JOHN JOSEPH, 748567, 117 Eastern Townships Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address in Eustis, Quebec. Born  19 November 1882, Ardee,  Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Miner. Next-of-kin Mrs J O’Connor, 4 Columbir St., Woster, (probably 4 Columbia Street, Worcester) Massachusetts,  USA, sister. Attested 29 January, 1916 at Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada,  

 

CUNNINGHAM, Private, A, Royal Engineers. From Broughton Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

1901 Census: Alexander Cunningham, age 12, occupation scholar resided at 108 Barrack Street, Dundalk. Church of Ireland. Father, James K Cunningham, age 43, occupation Railway Employee. Widower. Church of Ireland, born Co Mayo. .

1911 Census: Alexander Gillespie Cunningham, age 22, occupation Pattern maker and Engine Fitter,  resided at 46 Broughton Street, Dundalk. Presbyterian. Nnephew of Head of Household, Alexander McAllister. Presbyterian.

 

CUNNINGHAM, Driver, J V, Royal Field Artillery. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CUNNINGHAM, JAMES, Connaught Rangers. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

CUNNINGHAM, Lance-Corporal, JOSEPH, 3905, B Company, 2 Leinster Regiment. From 2 Platten Road, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census, Joseph Cunningham, age 9, lived at 25 Plattin Road, Drogheda, occupation Scholar. Father, Michael Cunningham age 51, occupation Retired Seamanr. Mother, Mary Cunningham, age 46. Four siblings. All born Co Louth.

1911 Census, Joseph Cunningham, age 20, lived at 6 Plattin Road, Drogheda, occupation General Labourer. Father, Michael Cunningham age 65, occupation Retired Mariner. Mother, Mary Cunningham, age 57. All born Co Louth.

 

CUNNINGHAM, Private, M, Royal Scots Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 22 July 1916)

 

CUNNINGHAM, Private, -Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 September 1916)

 

CUNNINGHAM, PATRICK, from Patrick Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 CUNNINGHAM, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Francis Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

1901 Census: Thomas Cunningham age 3, resided at 21 Francis Street, Drogheda.  Father, also Thomas Cunningham, age 25, born Co Louth, occupation Tailor. Mother, Jane Cunningham, age 23, born Co Louth. (Three siblings, the eldest of whom is reported to be 10 years old, which at the very least questions the veracity of the details parents’ ages).

1911 Census: Thomas Cunningham age 13, resided at 31 Francis Street, Drogheda. Occupations scholar. Father, also Thomas Cunningham, age 40, born Co Louth, occupation Tailor. Mother, Jane Cunningham, age 38, born Co Louth. (Some adjustment to the parents’ ages carried out).

 

CUNNINGHAM,  THOMAS, 1514,  6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Also served in 4197 Royal Irish Regiment and 31170 King’s Own Scottish Borderers. Father James Cunningham from John Street, Dundalk. Enlisted 11 November 1914.

Saw action with Expeditionary Forces in Mediterranean and France Discharged 1919. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk. 

1901 Census: There is a Thomas Cunningham, age 5, occupation Scholar, lived at 7 Shields Court, Dundalk. Mother, Mary Cunningham, age 40.  Two other siblings, Bernard age 14 and James age 8.

1911 Census: There is a Thomas Cunningham, age 14, no occupation, father James Cunningham, aged 50,  occupation Bricklayer, lived at 7 Shields Court, Dundalk. Mother, Mary Cunningham, age 48.  Two other siblings. Bernard age 23 and James aged 8.

 

CURLEY, Sergeant, Royal Field Artillery. From Brunswick Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

CURLEY, P, Royal Field Artillery. From Bachelors’ Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Probably Pte. Private Thomas Curley, 88540, Royal Field Artillery, from Bachelor Walk, Dundalk, Enlisted 1915. Served n Mediterranean. Discharged 1916. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1911 Census: Thomas Curley, age 24, born Dublin City, lived at 14 Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. Occupation Shoe Maker. Wife, Rose Anne, age 21, born Co Louth. Two children.

 

CURRAN, T, Royal Naval Reserve.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

DALY, from Oriel Temple, Co. Louth

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

DALY, Corporal, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

DALY, GEORGE. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

DALY, Cadet, HUBERT, Royal Field Artillery.

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

DALY, Lieutenant, OSCAR, Intelligence. Oscar Bedford King Daly was born on 2nd September 1880. Son of Robert Bedford Daly and Amelia Daly of Laurence Street. Father’s profession was Auctioneer and Stockbroker.

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: Oscar Daly, age 20,  lived with his aunt at 22 Strand Road, Donnybrook, Dublin. Born Co Louth, occupation Student UCD. Church of Ireland. No sign on 1911 Census.

9th South Wales Borderers and Welsh Regiment. 

 

 Oscar Bedford Daly went to Kenya before the war and established a law practice Tonks, Daly and Figgis, in 1912. (Kenya Gazette, 15 May 1912), He continued this practice after the war with different partners (Kenya Gazette, 30 April 1924).  Sir Oscar Bedford Daly, possibly the same person, was acting as Chief Justice in the Bahamas in the 1940s.

 
Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin. No.2990
In Loving Memory of OSCAR BEDFORD DALY Born 2nd September 1880 died
29th June 1953 and of his wife ELIZABETH MARIA DALY who died 6th
January 1965. "God is Love" (DUBLIN, Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin, Part 20, Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives)
 

 DALY, Private, PATRICK, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Blackrock, Dundalk. Wounded three times. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DALY, THOMAS. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

DALY, WILLIAM. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

DANIELS, WILLIAM CHARLES MCLELLAND, 2497750, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  155 Leslie Street, Toronto, Canada. Born 11 October 1895, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Presbyterian.  Occupation Clerk. Next-of-kin Emily Daniels, 155 Leslie Street, Toronto, mother.  Attested  11 July, 1917 at Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

1901 Census: William Charles age 5 resided at 35 Dublin Street, Dundalk. Born Co Louth. Father, Henry Daniels, age 39, born England. Occupation Coach Body Maker,  Mother, Emily Daniels, age 29, born Co Down. Two siblings.  All Presbyterian.

 

DARCY, F. From Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Francis Darcy, 8540, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Originally enlisted 1904. Served in France. Discharged 1916. Service file on ancestry.co.uk. Medal record marked ‘Deserted’ (UK National Archives, Medal Index File 372/5/168878)

1911 Census: Francis Darcy, age 34,  lived at 29 Dublin Street, Dundalk,. Occupation General Labourer. Wife, Mary Darcy, age 32. One child.

 

DAWE, JOHN HARRY,  900, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Dixon, Missouri, USA. Born 12 May 1893, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Dentist. Next-of-kin Mrs Hattie Dawe,  Dixon, Missouri, USA, mother. Attested 26 March 1918,  Winnipeg, Manitoba.

1901 Census: John Dawe, age 7, born Co Louth, lived at house 7, Bellurgan, Ballymascanlan, Dundalk. Father Patrick age 55, occupation farmer, born Co Louth. . Mother Hettie, age 47, born America, Methodist. Three siblings, two born in America.

 

DAWSON,  CLAUD WILLIAM EDWARD, 27, ‘A’ Section, 3 Field Ambulance, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda, Co Louth.  Age 24. Occupation Fitter. Church of England. Next-of-kin, George A Dawson, Mossman Bay,  Sydney, New South Wales, father.  Previous military experience, 2 Light Horse Guard (still serving).  Enlisted  20 August 1914. To Gallipoli (not dated). To hospital Gallipoli 22 August 1915, influenza. To hospital ship 2 September 1915,  gastroenteritis . Reported dangerously ill 10 October 1915. Invalided to Australia from Suez for discharge 4 November 1915. Arrived Australia , 4 December 1915. Returned to duty 17 July 1916 in Australia.  Medical report dated 14 September states ‘Shell shock and dysentery‘  as the reason for disability. Discharged 1 November 1916 as medically unfit. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

DAWSON, Captain, H, 18 Battalion Royal Irish Regiment. From Priorland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DAY, Colour Sergeant, -, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Barrack Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DEANE, Leading Seaman, P C, T. B. Destroyer Chameleon. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Possibly Patrick Deane serial no. 228541, born Dundalk, 2 November 1887., occupation Barman. Enlisted in the navy 2 November 1905 for 12 years. Re-enlisted 21 November 1917.  Served in many ships including HMS Chameleon at the time of the Tempest Annual report. Drowned off Dawlish, Devon, after the war on 27 April 1920 while serving on HMS Valiant.  (UK National Archives WO ADM/188/404)

Patrick Deane and his father-in-law William Demaine, aged 50, a retired policeman were drowned at Dawlish on 27 April 1920. They were sailing in the company of Patty Officer Baker of the Dawlish Coast Guard in a fourteen foot dinghy when the weather freshened but they were unable to put the boat about. On the third attempt  to do so the boat overturned and all three were thrown into the water. Deane and  Baker retrieved Demaine who showed no sign of life, and held on to the upturned boat for up to an hour. The boat kept turning over, which weakened the men, and after a while Deane seemed to give away. Baker tried to get a lifebelt onto Deane but was unable to do so. Deane let go suddenly and seemed to go straight down. Petty Officer Baker was on the point of drowning when he was rescued. Willam Demaine’s body was recovered shortly afterwards, and an Inquest held on 30 April, 1920. The body of Patrick Deane was recovered on Wednesday 5 May, evidence of identification was given by Patrick Deane’s sister, Mary Wilkinson, widow of Sergt. E Wilkinson, 6th Royal Fusiliers.  Inquest was held on 7 May 1920. (Abridged from the reports  in The Western Times, 29 April, 30 April, 1 May, 7 May, 8 May 1920,)

 

DEERY (DEARY), Cattleman, Frank. St Brigid’s Terrace, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918. 

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

DEERY, JOHN, lived at 78 George’s Street Drogheda in house owned by Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

DEVERIL(sic), Midshipman, G R, HMS Thunder. George Robert Deverell married Maude Anna Elizabeth Cooke on 1st January 1898. His profession is given as banker, and future address is Dublin. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

1901 Census: George Deverell age 35, lived at 90 Clonskeagh Road, Dublin. Born King’s County (Offaly), occupation Bank Clerk. Wife, Maude A E, age 24, born Co Dublin. One son. All Church of Ireland.

1911 Census: George Deverell age 45 lived at 5 Vergemount, Pembroke West, Dublin. Occupation Assistant Secretary Bank of Ireland. Wife Maude 34, three children.

A report in the Irish Independent 28 May 1932 noted the following ‘ Estate of Bank Accountant-General. Mr George Deverell, Killencoole, Castlebellingham, Co Louth, Accountant-General of the Bank of Ireland and formerly of 5 Vergemount, Clonskeagh, Dublin, left £2,643 all to his widow.

 

DEVIN, ANDREW, Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. Wounded in action.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

DEVIN, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer district. Brother of Andrew Devin. Wounded in action. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

DEVINE, Private, FREDERICK, Royal Army Medical Corps. From 7 Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

1901 Census: Frederick Devine age 5, and James Devine age 10 lived at house 37.2 Barrack Street, Dundalk, both born Co Louth. Father James Devine age 56,  born Co Tryone, occupation Army Pensioner Royal Irish Rifles. Mother Rose Ellen Devine, age 34, born Co Louth. Three other siblings, Joseph age 8 being the only boy. (see reference in report on James Devine below). Another brother John born 1901, joined the army in 1918 as a boy soldier. but died in 1920. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1911 Census: Family lived at house 109.1 Barrack Street Joseph was a waiter in the military canteen Army Barracks, Frederick was a scholar. No sign of James.

 

DEVINE, Corporal, JAMES, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 7 Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

            Amongst the local names in the casualty lists this week is that of Bombardier Joseph Devine R.F.A., Barrack Street, Dundalk, second son of the late Sergeant Devine, for many years an instructor to the R.I.R. who died on May 21 as the result of wounds received in an engagement on the 19th May. Mrs Devine also received intimation that another son, James, a corporal in the R.I.R. was wounded in the feet at the battle of Neuve Chapelle in March and is at present convalescent at a Red Cross hospital in Wainfleet, Lincs. A third son is at the front.

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 May 1915)

 

James Devine, serial no 4531, enlisted in 1908, and also served in the Connaught Rangers and Royal Irish Regiment. Served in France 1915. Discharged 1916. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

 

DEVINE, JOSEPH, 2004525, Yukon Infantry Company, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 12 December 1871, ‘near Dundalk’. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Placer and Quartz Miner. Next-of-kin,  Edward Manuel, Sulphur, Yukon, friend. Attested , 4 October 1916, at Dawson, Yukon, Canada. 

 

DEVINE, WILLIAM, 24234. Royal irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Enlisted 19 April 1916. Deserted 1916. Service file available on ancestry.co.uk. Noted on file  that his father William Devine serving in Royal Irish Fusiliers.

 

DEVLIN, JOHN,4030080,  1 Depot Battalion, 1 Quebec Regiment. Address:  840 Clarke Street, Montreal. Born 7 May 1884, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of kin,  Mrs Ellen Devlin,  5 Woodview Terrace, Castletown Road, Dundalk, mother.  Drafted 11 November 1917, at Montreal, Canada.

 

DEVINS, J, 2 Battalion, Irish Guards. From Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DILLON, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded

(Dundalk Democrat , 29 December 1917, Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

DILLON, Private, W, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

DIXON, Private, D, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

 

DOBBIN, Lieutenant-Colonel, HERBERT  T, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. From Omeath.

            County Louth Officer’s Bravery.

On Monday last the King held an Investure at Buckingham Palace, and amongst the Irish Officers who had the honour of receiving decorations at his hands was Lieutenant Colonel Herbert T Dobbin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. His Majesty conferred on his the D S O in recognition of his clever handling of his battalion, which on two occasions captured 500 yards and 400 yards, respectively, of enemy trenches. The new D S O  is one of the three soldier sons of Lieutenant Colonel G M Dobbin (late Royal Artillery), Drumulla House, Omeath, County Louth. Lieutenant Colonel Dobbin is a regular officer of the Cornwall Light Infantry. Another brother, Major Leonard S Dobbin, Northamptonshire Regiment, won the DSO this year. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

DOBBIN, Major,  LEONARD GEORGE WILLIAM, D.S.O., of Drummulla House, Co. Louth.

Eldest son of Lieut. -Col. George Miller Dobbin, J.P., late R.A., of Drummulla House, who died 1919, by Elizabeth Jane, who d. 1905, daughter of the late Lieut.-Col.

George Turnbu,  Marshall, Bengal Army; b. 1871.Major Dobbin, who was educated at Oxford Military College and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, is Major and Acting Lieut-Col. Northamptonshire Regiment.  Drummulla House, Omeath, Co. Louth ; Junior Army and Navy Club.

Edward Walford, The county families of the United Kingdom; or, Royal manual of the titled and untitled aristocracy of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, Volume 59.  (1919).

 

DOHERTY, Private, EDWARD, Irish Guards. From Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded and prisoner (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

See McALESTER, Private, SAM, Irish Guards.

 

We are delighted to hear that Mrs Ned Doherty, Chapel Street, has had a postcard from her husband (lately reported ‘missing’). He is a prisoner in Germany and wounded – but that is comparatively good news.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 January 1918)

 

A lot of the boys and girls are drifting home from the battlefields… Mr Eddie Doherty (who it will be recalled was mourned as dead for over a week after one of the big battles on the Western front last year, but subsequently was found to have been taken prisoner) has arrived in Dundalk, looking very fit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 January 1919)

 

DOHERTY  EDWARD from Wrightson’s Lane Dundalk, previous service in Royal Irish Rifles and 199363 Royal Garrison artillery. Served as 3918 with 6th Royal Irish Rifles (Louth Militia) fron 1 April 1907. Transferred to 4th RIR, 10.2.1908. Mobilized 27  August 1914. Served in France. Discharged 1917.  Re-enlisted June 1919 no 702885  in Labour Corps, discharged four months later. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk.

1911 Census:shows the family at 12 Feehan’s Yard, Dundalk. Wife Brigid age 35. Five children. Children then were Thomas (15), Mary (12), Edward (10), Kathleen (5), and Michael (4).

 

DOHERTY, Sergeant, P, 6 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Mary Street North, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DOLENDO, Private, J, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

DONAGH, Corporal, P A, 6 Battalion Connaught Rangers.

Corporal P A Donagh, 6th Battalion Connaught Rangers, was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry, volunteering with a comrade, to take messages forward under an extremely heavy bombardment, when all telephonic communication had been cut. They accomplished their dangerous mission with success. Corporal Donagh was formerly in the employment of the Great Northern Railway Co and did duty in their offices at Navan, Lisburn, Armagh and Belfast. He is the eldest son of the late Mr Joseph Donagh, of Mary Street, Drogheda, cashier to the Drogheda and Castlebellingham Brewery, and  of Mrs Donagh, Lisnegar, Rathcormac, Co Cork. (Irish Times, 1 April, 1916).

1901 Census: Patrick A Donagh, age 7, lived at 13 Mary Street, Drogheda. Born Co Louth. Father, Joseph Donagh, age 36, born Co Louth, occupation Commercial Clerk Brewery. Mother, Maryanne Donagh, age 36, born Co Louth. Four siblings.

1911 Census: Patrick Donagh, age 17, was boarding at 42 Brew Hill, Navan,  occupation Railway Clerk.

 

 DONNAN, H from Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. ( Howard Donnan listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham) (Casualty report Dundalk Democrat, 22 June 1918)

1901 Census: Howard Donnan, age 6, lived at house 72 Castlebellingham, Co Louth. Presbyterian. Father, Howard Robinson Donnan, age 39, born Co Louth, occupation Store Man and Store Clerk. Mother Margaret Donnan, age 35, born Co Wicklow. Four siblings including Robert W below, age 4.

1911 Census Howard age 17, was boarding house no 7 Demesne Rural, Dundalk, occupation Telephone Apprentice. , 

 

DONNAN, ROBERT (Report of meeting in Annagassan chaired by Brigadier General Edward Bellingham) He suggested that the ex-servicemen form a club to look after their interests under the new Act, or in the alternative form a branch of the Comrades of the Great War or the Discharged or Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation.

Immediately afterwards a branch of the D S and S A was formed of which the following officials were appointed – President, Jas Hosie; Treasurer, Robt. Donnan, Secretary, Owen Campbell. About 50 members were enrolled.

(Dundalk Democrat, 17 January 1920)

1911 Census: Robert  William Donnan, age 14, lived at house 36.2 Castlebellingham, Co Louth. Presbyterian. Father, Howard Robinson Donnan, age 49, born Co Louth, occupation Store Clerk. Mother Margaret Donnan, age 45, born Co Wicklow. Two siblings.

 

DONNELLY, PATRICK. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DOOLAN, JOHN, lived at 79 George’s Street, in a house owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

DORAN, Captain, WILLIAM, JP, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Chairman of Louth County Council

            Chairman Goes To The Front

Mr W A Doran, J P Chairman, at the quarterly meeting of the Louth Co Council on last Thursday, tendered his resignation on his having joined the Army. A democratic England, he said, had given the Home Rule. Time and again it had been promised that if that were given Ireland wound no longer be a broken reed, but would be  a strong arm to England. Mr Redmond had assured Mr Asquith that Ireland would keep her promise. That promise meant to him (Mr Doran) a personal appeal, and he was going to answer the call of his leader, serving Ireland so far as any man could serve her. On the motion of Mr J McCarthy, J P , seconded by Mr W T Skeffington, J P, it was decided “to keep the chair open until Mr Doran’s return”. Mr C A Duffy, J P, was elected vice-chairman.

(Drogheda Independent, 14 November, 1914).

 

Not a few fine young men have left Dundalk during the last month or so to join the Irish Guards or other regiments for service during the war. Many of these young men are of a class well described as “comfortable”, and they joined the army at this crises because they believed it a duty upon them to bear a hand in checking the German menace. They went without any drum-beating or flag waving, but not without abundant good wishes for their safety through the imminent perils of war. When our well-known public men volunteer for active service they cannot slip away unnoticed. This week Louth has sent away three such men – Sir Vere Foster, Chairman of the Ardee Board of Guardians, who has gone for training with the Norfolk Yeomanry; Mr W A Doran Chairman of the Louth County Council, who has enlisted in the new Irish Brigade, and Mr S H Moynagh, solicitor, Vice-chairman of the urban Council, who has joined the Rugby battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers. This trio represents a very notable contribution to the new army. We think everybody – even the few who pretend they are Pro-German (but are in their secret hearts nothing of the kind) – will compliment these recruits on their pluck: especially in having “listed” in the rank and file instead of seeking the softer billets to which their position and education would entitle them. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 November 1914).

 

When Mr W A Doran, J P a member of the Ardee Board of Guardians entered the boardroom to attend the meeting on Tuesday, we was accorded a warm reception. Mr Doran was attired in the uniform of the regiment to which he is attached. (Drogheda Independent, 13 February 1915)

 

We don’t know if the recruiting meeting held in Dundalk, Carlingford and Ardee held this week were immediately was a successful – though we have heard of several useful additions being made to the army – but they were certainly interesting and harmonious. There was one feature about them that was particularly appropriate. It was that the appeals to enlist came from soldiers, who were only asking others to do what they had done, and to “come and help”. That is a kind of appeal no man can resent. We particularly liked the sensible and patriotic speech of Lieutenant Doran at Ardee. He put the case for recruiting in a few words better than we have yet seen it put.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 August 1915)

 

(Meeting of Louth County Council) The Chairman’s departure – The Chairman said he came across to attend that meeting of the Council that he might hand in his resignation as Chairman of the Council. He would be leaving in a very short time for active service, and he considered that it would be stultifying if he continued in that position. He felt very keenly the honour they had done him by re-electing him Chairman, but the time had come now when he was about to move out, and it would not be fair to the county that the Chairman should be absent while important business was to be transacted. The business of the Co. Council was getting more complex  as time went on, and from a purely business point of view it was desirable that the Council should have the service of an active Chairman and Vice-Chairman on the spot. It was with feelings of deep regret that he resigned the Chairmanship that day, but he hoped please God, to return to the Council as a member at some future time.

Mr Skeffington said he was giving expression not only to the views of the members of the Council but to the views of the people of the count6y when he rose to move that the Chairman’s resignation be not accepted. He thought – and he said so with all respect – that the members of the Council were the best judges of what should be done in the circumstances, and they were of the opinion that Mr Doran should retain the Chairmanship.

Chairman – I feel deeply what you have said, but I must ask you to accept my resignation

Mr Skefffington – I don’t think the members of the Council will accept your resignation.

Mr Hamill seconded Mr Skeffington’s motion that the resignation of the Chairman be not accepted. They had been deprived of the services of Mr Doran for a few months now, but everything had gone on smoothly. They were in the happy position of having a very attentive Vice-Chairman, and he thought Mr Doran would be responding to the feelings of the Council if he did not press the matter further.

Chairman – You are putting me in a very difficult position. Your Chairman is absolutely useless to your at present. The Council declined to accept the resignation of the Chairman and the meeting adjourned.

(Dundalk Democrat, 13 November 1915)

 

The 16th in the Trenches

A peep behind the scenes

 

Mr Charles M’Alester, Secretary of Louth County Council, has received the following interesting letter from Lieut. W A Doran, Chairman of the County Council, now serving in France.

 

February 1916

Dear Mt M’Alester – Since my last letter, my company has taken two spells in the trenches, and we are now in back billets getting ready for our third. After this we go in as a Brigade. The older men and the hopelessly inefficient have been nearly all weeded out. The older men stuck the trenches all right, but broke down on the long marches; an 18 mile march with 40 lb equipment is a fairly severe test. The health of the men has been very good and few have gone to hospital.

There have been some casualties in the Brigade, but only one man in my Company. A man of my platoon had his hand hit with shrapnel and has gone home. So far we are the lucky ones. This is not war in the old sense of the word. You never see a German or they you, for the moment a man is seen a sniper gets busy, and it is keep down or go under. It is extraordinary how few men are outed considering the enormous quantity of shells fired. When a “straff” is on they come up on a small sector at the rate of one per second. Yet the last time we were in there were only about 80 casualties, most of these were in the Battalions we were attached to. The most nerve testing work to my mind is working in the open, close up to the German front at night. On two occasions the party I was over were discovered by the German Flashes – which for a few moments turn night into day – and they pumped shrapnel over us, but though some had close calls they failed to get us. This night trench digging has to be done at all costs. IN some of the hottest sectors it is all done by sap. Both sides are so alert that to use the phrase current –“they have the windup.” So keep lights always on top and sweep the front with machine gun and rifle fire. We move up again on Sunday and wonder will this be the long promised “straff” and which side is going to start the ball. You at home will know more than we do out here. My theory is that wherever your papers say the fight is coming off is not the spot at all. It is only eyewash. I hope the fight is coming off and that there will be no cessation until this cursed war is finished. If peace comes before Germany has had to fight on her own soil and her people know by experience what war means, she will be ready to try her luck again inside five years time.

I can’t believe that people who have had war such as this is, devastating town and country, would ever want fighting again while memory lasts. Here where I am billeted I noticed the woman of the house was constantly crying – I find she has lost her four sons and husband, the latter was a carpenter by trade, and two half finished carts and scattered tools in his little workshop have pathos and appeal. In a ruined garden city where we were held in reserve in cellars, our Sergeant Major while looking through the wrecked house at night (we could not show in the day time) came on a dead woman with a dead child across her knees. The door was partly blocked by a German, pinned to a wall by a miner’s pickaxe through his head. The Germans had held this town before we pushed them out. All this bitter barren wastage fills one with anger, hopeless rage and doubt; but the nights help, when for hours I watch the fleet of stars sail up the sky, apart, untouched by all the clamour. He who sets and guides them on their course is guiding here. God has some lesson, for Humanity could be taught in no other school. Whatever that is, God grant it may be learned.

I have written this, and you may easily see at different times, when a spare minute came my way. The writing is hardly legible, but why, Oh why! When you sent my last letter to the papers did they print “guts” for juts.

Your very sincerely, Wm A Doran

PS - I notice in the occasional papers that come our way, a growing call for reprisals in kind for Zeppelin raids. Well there can be only one opinion on that question, if moral forces hold sway. It is Hell’s own doctrine. To copy the Prussian, and shower bombs on women and children is to be beaten by him. In that case he has forced his spirit on us. Victory for him and defeat for us, indeed! (Dundalk Democrat, 11 March 1916)

 

Long letter encouraging recruitment. (Dundalk Democrat 28 October 1916)

 

The Political Prisoners

To the Editor of the “Democrat”

Sir – With regard to Mr Murphy’s Amnesty resolution at today’s meeting of the Louth County Council, I stood aloof as it seemed of a kind in which at present I can take no part. It struck me after the meeting that had Mr Murphy embodied in his resolution a suggestion that if released the prisoners would enlist in the French service for the duration of the war, it would almost certainly have a power and appeal that would bring pardon and release. There can be no possible objection to such a course. Ireland owes France much, and it would be one way of repaying the debt. The Foreign Legion mow takes its honoured place in the line and many Americans, amongst others, have joined. In it a man may rise high, and nationality no bar to advancement. It is a man’s way out.

Yours truly, Wm A Doran, Capt. 9 RDF. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 January 1917)

1901 Census: William Doran age 31, lived at house 1 Harristown South. Occupation Farmer. Methodist., Father William Doran age 72, Born Co Louth. Two siblings, oneborn Co Tippperary, one born Co Louth. Both Methodists.

1911 Census: William Alexander Doran age 42 lived at house 12, Tullakeel, Clonkeen, Louth. Age 42, born Co Louth, occupation Farmer. Wesleyan Methodist. Wife Margaret Constance Doran, age 32, born Co Louth. Irish Presbyterian. One child.

 

DOYLE, JOHN,

            “During renovation work in Bellingham Castle in the late 1950s Dermot Meehan uncovered (a) floorboard with the following inscription. “Poor Jack Doyle, found shot dead this morning above Sherry’s cross, blindfolded with his hands tied behind his back and four bullets in him, a label on his breast ‘convicted spy’ How will it all end? I hope when this board is lifted again that the curse of civil war and the dark cloud that hangs over our Country will be a thing of the past.”

It was written on 29th December 1922, by Bernard Clarke, a carpenter, who was working for the Bellingham Estate. As luck would have it, a son of Bernard’s, Michael, who lived nearby and called frequently to see how work was going on, was shown this floor board and it turned out to be written in a carpenter’s pencil by his father…

John Doyle was an ex-serviceman who served in the British Army until the end of the war. He was only 35 years of age and was described as a quiet and inoffensive young man who had never been mixed up in politics. His shooting caused great consternation in the area.” (Looking Forward, Looking Back, Sean Boyle (ed) Stories memories and musings of Castlebellingham, Kilsaran and Stabannon, 2003)

‘On 24 December 1922, a convoy of National Army troops was engaged on follow-up searches for Irregulars in the Castlebellingham area. Having difficulty in locating one of the houses which they wished to search, one group of soldiers came upon Jack Doyle, took him up in a lorry, and either forced him or persuaded him to show them their target. Jack Doyle was an ex British soldier from Castlebellingham. On the morning of 29 December Jack Doyle was found at Lynns, near Annagassan, by Thomas Flood, himself an ex-soldier, shot six or seven times. There was a card with the words “convicted spy” on his chest. The inquest jury found that Doyle was ‘foully murdered by some person or persons unknown’. (Extract from unpublished PhD thesis, Violence and political factionalism and their affects on North Louth 1874-1943, Donal Hall (Maynooth, 2009))

 

DOWDALL, Corporal, THOMAS, Motor Dispatch Rider, Royal Engineers. From Tateetra, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

We hear that Mr Tom Dowdall, only son of Mr W V Dowdall, J P Tateetra, has been accepted for service as a motor despatch-rider at the seat of war. This is about as dangerous a service as any in the present war, and it has proved itself a matter of vital importance to the armies engaged. We hope this plucky youngster will emerge from the ordeal safe and sound.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 December 1914)

 

Another Dundalk man home for a short holiday is Corporal Tim Dowdall of Tateetra, who for several months past has been actively engaged with the Motor Cycling Corps, which is doing such splendid work with the British Army in France. Though constantly under fire, as all those motor cyclists are, he has come through without a scratch. Some weeks ago however, he got a bad dose of German poison gas, from which, we are glad to say, he is rapidly recovering; and a few days on the uplands of Tateetra will, we hope, make him as fit as a fiddle. (Dundalk Democrat, 18 September 1915)

 

We have Mr Tommy Dowdall home on leave this week, well known up at Tateetra. Mr Dowdall joined the colours as a motor despatch rider in December, 1914, and was sent to France in May, 1915. He was in the battle at Hill 60 and was one of the victims of a liquid fire attack at Hooge near Ypres, where also he was knocked over by shell-shock and gassed, but after a spell in hospital resumed duty. After temporary duty with the Naval Division he was sent to the 18th Division in action on the Somme. In carrying despatches he was knocked off his motor bicycle and received injuries which laid him up for five weeks. Getting back to work he was in action on the 18th and 25th September at Flers and Guidecourt and for his fearless discharge of dangerous duty, he was recommended by his Divisional Commanded for promotion. Mr Dowdall has the choice of accepting a lieutenancy in any regiment with vacancies, but he prefers to wait for an opportunity in an Irish regiment.

(Dundalk Democrat, 25 November 1916)

 

DOWDALL, Second Lieutenant, THOMAS, 3 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Tateetra, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

Thomas Vincent Patrick Dowdall, 54309, Corporal Royal Engineers, in France 27 June 1815, Second Lieutenant Leinster Regiment., 27 March 1917.  (UK National Archives, Meal Card Index, WO 372/6/110625)

 

DOWDLE, FRANK, 3039539, 1 Depot Battalion, 1 C.O. Regiment,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  Syracuse House, Syracuse, New York,  USA.  Born 15 October 1885,  Ardee, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin,  Mrs Stella Shiner, General Delivery, Syracuse, New York, USA, friend. Attested  28 May 1918, Toronto, Canada.

 

DOWNEY, HUGH. From Collon.

Hugh Downey, a grocer’s assistant, aged 21 years, and a native of Collon, was charged at Dublin Police Court with attempting to evade military service. He has been a barman in Liverpool from February 1915 to January 1916. Defendant said he was the sole support of his father and mother. He had a brother in the army and another in the navy. He was remanded for an escort, and asked if he would be allowed to join in Dublin. (Dundalk Democrat, 15 April 1916)

 

DOWNEY, Private, J, 2 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Collon. ‘Wounded, now in Netley Hospital.’ (Drogheda Advertiser 15 January 1915)

Possibly 8815 James Downey, Pte, 1 Connaught Rangers, In France 26 September 1914. discharged 23 August 1915. (UK National Archives, Medal Card Index, WO 372/6/115085)

 

DOYLE, JAMES, alias KIRK, JAMES, 2004357, Canadian Army Service Corps (Reinforcements), Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   Indiana Hotel 4th Street, Los Angeles, California, USA. Born 9 March, 1885, Dundalk. Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin, Mrs Margaret Sheppard,  82 Hill Street, Newry, Co Down, sister. Attested  Vancouver, Canada, 8 December 1915. 

 

DOYLE, JOSEPH VINCENT, 3081569,1st Depot Battalion, 1st Quebec Regiment,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  Cheshire, Connecticut, USA. Born Co Louth, 13 April 1889. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Mechanical Draftsman. Next-of-kin, Mrs Frances Doyle, Cheshire, Connecticut, USA, mother. Attested January 16, 1918, Montreal, Canada.

 

DOYLE, RICHARD,  55030, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 6 October, 1878, Drogheda, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Carpenter.  Previous military service, twelve years in the Royal Engineers.   Next-of-kin,  (indecipherable) Doyle, 93 Richardson Street, W Bradford, Canada, wife. Attested 11 November 1914 at Toronto, Canada

 

DRURY, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

 

DUFF, PATRICK JOSEPH, 19810, 6th Field Company Engineers, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth. Age 34 years and five months. Occupation Steward. Widower with two children. Next-of-kin, George Duff,  27 Wilton Street,  Southampton, England, son.   Church of England. Enlisted 7 August 1916 at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Embarked from Australia 21 November 1917. Arrived in England 30 January 1918. To France, 13 August 1918. Granted leave from 7 April 1919 to 7 July 1919, reason, Farming, attending J Duff, Market Square, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Returned to Australia 13 October 1919. Discharged 13 November 1919.  Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

DUFFY, Sgt-Major, ARTHUR, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. 7450 Warrant Officer II. Active in British Legion in Dundalk and negotiated with Irish Sailors and Soldiers Trust on behalf of tenants of the Trusts houses in Dundalk.

DUFFY (Dundalk) at her residence, 2 Legion Avenue , Dundalk, Rose, wife of Sgt-Major Arthur Duffy, RDF, RIP. Remains will be removed to St Nicholas’ Church, this (Tuesday) evening at 7.30. Funeral tomorrow (Wednesday) at 1 o’clock to Dromin cemetery. (Irish Independent, 13 December 1938)

(According to Dromin Inscriptions, on this website, Arthur and Rose Duffy, and their son Noel, are buried at Row 5 plot 11 in Dromin Graveyard)

 

DUFFY, Private, F, 7 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda

            Dear Sir

We have heard of a rumour in circulation in Drogheda to the effect that  Messrs A Davis & Co Ltd have discharged certain of their assistants in order to force them to join the Army. Would you kindly give this rumour a flat contradiction, for it is absolutely false, and no member of the staff has ever been approached on the subject. We have volunteered to fight for our country and Empire of our own free will, and Messrs Davis have not alone at very considerable inconvenience to themselves allowed me us to resign our situations, but gave us each a substantial present on leaving and promised to install us in our situations at the conclusion of the war. Yours truly – Privates H M Namara, F Duffy, E M’Clelland, H Sheckleton, all of the 7th Batt. Leinster Regt.

(Drogheda Independent, 29 May 1915)

 

DUFFY, JOHN, 258964, 27 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.  Born 17 March 1878, Drogheda, Co Louth.  No religious persuasion indicated.  Occupation Railroad Man. Next-of-kin,  Mrs Mary Boylan,  (indecipherable), Londonderry, sister. Attested 13 October 1916, Calgary, Canada.

 

DUFFY, Trooper, GEORGE, 4 Battalion Queen’s Own Hussars. From Anne Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

DUFFY, Private, H, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Ardee. Reported missing.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 September, 1916)

 

DUFFY, Private, SAMUEL, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Pvte (ES) Kirk comes from a fighting family. His Uncle, Sam Duffy, is in the trenches somewhere. When he was last home he had a prayer–book in which a German bullet had imbedded itself. But for that it would have made a hole through him large enough to let life out. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 June 1917)

 

DUFFY, Private, T, Irish Guards. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 19 August 1916)

 

DUFFY, THOMAS, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk.

Thos Duffy of the Royal Irish Rifles, pleaded guilty to breaking a plate glass window, the property of Mrs M Walsh, Church Street.

Mr C J M’Gahon, who appeared for accused, said he joined the army on the outbreak of war and came home on leave, when he was treated rather too generously by his friends. He had that morning taken the pledge, and as he had not been allowed out on bail, he thought he had sufficiently expiated the offence.

His Honor said the offence was a stupid sort of one, but he would allow accused out under the Probation of Offenders Act in the hope that he would live up to the character given him by Mr M’Gahon. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 June 1915)

 

DUGDALE, W, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

(Dundalk Democrat, 7 September 1916)

 

DULLAGHAN, Stoker, OWEN, Royal Navy, HMS Lowestoft. From Mill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DULLAGHAN, Private, THOMAS, 1 Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. From Casey’s Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). 4 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Wounded July 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

DUNBAR, C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mounthamilton, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DUNBAR, Corporal, SAMUEL D, 8 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

DUNNE, John, From Drogheda.

Six sons at the front. Drogheda’s record in soldier sons is probably held by John Dunne, a builders’ labourer, who is a native of Drogheda and resides in the West Gate vicinity. He has six sons in the Army, five of whom, John, Frank, James, Paddy and Edward are at the front, whilst the youngest, Joseph, is now on his way there. James, Paddy and Edward went through the Boer War, and the father is an ex-sergeant of the 6th Battalion, R I R (Louth Militia).

(Drogheda Independent, 14 November, 1914)

            Francis Dunne was killed in action 16 June 1915 (DH)

 

DUNNE, Private, J, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dunleer. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

DUNNE, Driver, Laurence, Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers. From North Marsh, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DUNNE, M, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

DUNNE, Private, P, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 9 St. Brigid’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916). Wounded September 1916 (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Mrs Dunne, St Brigid’s Terrace, has received notification that her son, Pte. P Dunne, is wounded and in hospital at Edinburgh. Mrs Dunne has already lost a son Laurence, killed at the front some time ago.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 September 1916)

 

The same Irish Guardsman whose brief appreciation of Jack M’Parland we quote elsewhere writes in the same letter: ‘We were in a village near Albert for over a fortnight before we went up, and while we were there I saw the Irish Division pass up. The 8th Dublin halted just at our billet, and who do you think I saw only Paddy Dunne … It’s grand to meet a fellow you know out here.’  This is the spirit that is too often lacking at home. It is fine to see Dundalk men fraternising for the sake of the old place they came from, even while in that same old place the fellows at home are engaged in the cheerful diversion of ‘gutting’ each other because of some fancied difference. The lads at the front are learning the realities of life while at home we are plodding along each in his own ‘sunken road’ with hedges of prejudice and ignorance on each hand blotting out our view of the real world around us. (Dundalk Democrat, 7 October 1916)

            Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

DUNNE, Private, P, 6 Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Quay Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916). Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916) (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

DUNNE, Private, Patrick, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DUNNE, Private, THOMAS, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From Lisdoo Road, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DUNNE, Private, THOMAS, Royal Army Service Corps. From Lisdoo, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

DURNAN, BERNARD, Royal Irish Rifles. From Priorland, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

            Possibly DURNIN, B from Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 June 1918

¦ Introduction ¦ Abernethy - Durnan ¦ Earl - Knox ¦ Ladley - Myles ¦ Neary - Wykes ¦

22 July 2014

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