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THE RETURNED ARMY

 

County Louth Servicemen in the Great War 1914 -1918

 

 

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EARL, Lance-Corporal, D, Irish Guards. From Dundalk. Reported missing.

(Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916)

 

EATON, Sapper, CHARLES, Royal Engineers. Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

EASTWOOD, Captain, F E,  6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Wounded 4 times Dardanelles. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Captain F E Eastwood, 6th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles, a member of the Castletown family, has been wounded at the Dardanelles. He obtained his captaincy on 23rd September, 1914. (Dundalk Democrat, 28 August 1915)

 

EASTWOOD, R J C, late 3 Baluchis, Sub Commandant Old Boy’s Corps, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

EASTHOPE, Cadet, J C,  Officer Training Corps, Manchester University. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

ECCLES, Corporal, JAMES, 8 Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 7 New Row, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ECCLES, Driver, PATRICK JOHN, D Battery, 84 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. From 7 New Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

ELLIS, Sergeant, FRED C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Son of Mr Ellis, St Peter’s. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 December 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

Sir – If space allows will you be so kind as to allow me to relate how some of the brave officers and men of the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles met their death at he battle of Fromelies on Sunday May 9th, both officers and men doing their best t o up-hold a name for the regiment. From the commanding officer to the platoon officers, not one escaped without some injury. The commanding officer got wounded early in the charge, but succeeded in getting as far as the 1st line of German trenches before being mortally wounded in the side, the second officer in command received a wound which also resulted in death. A Mr. Keinsport, the officer in charge of C Company, received a wound in the early part of the fight, but getting up, began to run shouting “come on C Company, let them have it,” meaning the bayonet, and they did, for out of 200 going in 409 came out. The machine gun officer ran with the tripod of the machine under his arm, and he fell uttering not a word. One or two officers fell shooting the Germans with their revolvers. All the officers were very much respected by the non-commissioned officers and men. Several men being surrounded fought with their hands against great odds. One corporal named O’Brien – a powerful looking man – succeeded in bayoneting several Germans before being himself finally felled with the butt-end of a German rifle. Another man a native of Navan was heard to say a few minutes before we got the word to fix bayonets, “Its either death or victory.” And the last seem of him was lying on the parapet of the second line of German trenches either dead or badly wounded; he paid for the charge dearly like all true hearted Irishmen. All through this charge the men were open to a terrible machine gun fire, and afterwards for 14 hours a most awful fire from the enemy’s “ Jack Johnstons”. These few lines I write seeing that of late the townspeople have been closely connected with the above named regiment. (signed) Lance-Cpl C Ellis. (Drogheda Advertiser, 5 May 1915)

                       

10/5/15            The Battalion left at 11 p.m. and marched to the assembly trenches at LA CORDONNERIE FARM where they arrived at 2 a.m. on the 9th to take part in the attack against the German trenches at ROUGES BANCS.

9/5/15              At 5.40 a.m., when our artillery terminated their bombardment on the German trenches, "C" and "D" Coys advanced in lines of Platoons at about 30 paces distance and rushed a portion of the front German trenches and advanced beyond it to a portion of a road at Point 830. The Rifle Brigade being on our right and on our left was the 13th London Regt (Kensington).  "A" and "B" Coys followed in the same formation immediately behind "C" and "D" Coys (minus 2 Platoons) and was subjected to a very heavy Machine Gun and Rifle Fire obliquely from both flanks from Germans who remained in portions of trench on either flanks of the line of our advance.  Of the two Platoons mentioned above, one advanced obliquely to the right under the Commanding Officer and the other under the Regimental Sergeant Major to the left to check and stop the cross fire.  Both Platoons were unable to achieve their object and were beaten back or killed or wounded.  In the meanwhile the remainder of the Battalion was holding the portion of the road mentioned above under oblique Machine Gun and Rifle fire and were expecting another Regiment to go through them and continue the advance.  This Regiment failed to appear, after waiting a half an hour beyond the time appointed for it's appearance the order was given to retire as our Regiment could make no effective reply to enemy's heavy fire and was losing heavily in Officers and men - time about 7 a.m.  What was left of this party returned to the captured portion of the front German trenches and established themselves there and placed themselves under the command of the O.C. Rifle Brigade also in the trench.  They remained all day 9th instant and until about day break 10th when they were driven out by Bombs and heavy fire and returned to our original trenches. The Regiment having lost all Officers either killed, wounded or missing, they were brought out of action by the Regimental Sergeant Major and returned to their billets at BAC ST MAUR at about 5 a.m. the 10th May 1915. (War Diary, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles)

 

ELLIS, HAROLD, HMS Revenge. Son of Mr Ellis, St Peter’s and on the staff of the Drogheda Advertiser. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

ELMORE, JOHN DANIEL, 258964, 1 Depot Battalion Saskatchewan Regiment, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Lent to Royal Air Force No 1263743. Address Kincaid, Saskatchewan. Born 10 August 1892, “O’meath County South Ireland,” (sic.)  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Plumber. Next-of-kin Mrs Katheline(sic.) Millin, La Clare Hotel, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  Drafted  23 August 1918, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

EMERSON, Lance-Corporal, EGERTON A,  2 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Collon. Taken prisoner at Mons (1914); now in Lemberg, Germany. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).  In Crossen Germany (15 January 1916) Brother of Herbert G Emerson below and Lieut James Emerson, who was killed in action on 6 December 1917 and was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross 12 February 1918. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

EMERSON, HERBERT G. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

EMERSON, HERBERT GORDON, 883756, 187 Overseas Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  126, 5th Avenue East, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Born 5 February, 1885, Collon, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Carpenter. Next-of kin,  Ellen Emerson, Collon, Co Louth, mother. Attested on  26 October 1916 at Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

 

 EMERSON, Private, J S, Royal Irish Rifles. Machine gunner. From Collon. ‘Left last week for France.’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

            See EMERSON, Lance-Corporal, EGERTON A, above.

 

ENGLISH, Lance Corporal, EDWARD JOSEPH, 4th or 8th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

EUSTACE, Private, A, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 17 June 1916,, as EUSTACE, A, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 29 December, 1917)

 

EVERS, CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH, 46, 1st Tropical Force. Australian Naval and Military Expedition.  Born St Mary’s, Drogheda. Age 26 and six months. Occupation Clerk. Next-of-kin, Ellen Evers, William Street, Drogheda, mother.  Roman Catholic. Previous military experience, Royal Irish Rifles, four years time expired; Royal Army Medical Corps, three years, resigned. Enlisted 12 August 1914. Sent to District Headquarters , 2nd Miitary District, on S.S. Morinda, as escort for prisoners from Rabaul. Discharged 8 January 1915, termination of period of enlistment.  Enlisted again 23 March 1915, at Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia, No 1383, 19 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force.  Served in  Gallipoli from 16 August 1915, to hospital in Alexandria December 1915. Served 7 day confined to barracks, absent without leave 2 February 1916 to 4 February 1916. Arrived in England 22 August  1916. Spent some time in various hospitals with gastritis. Overstayed leave 2 March 1917 to 5 March 1917, awarded 7 days confined to barracks and forfeited 4 days pay.   Returned to Australia 4 July 1917. Discharged 30 July 1917, medically unfit.  Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

EVERS, Rifleman, JOHN, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FAGAN, JAMES MICHAEL, 5480, 17/11 44 Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces. Confusing service file. Age 21 at enlistment, 2 March 1915, but date of the form is 12 May 1916, with “Returned Soldier” noted on the form and also noted that the attestation was taken “At sea” on A60 HMAT (His Majesty’s Australian Transport) .  Born Dundalk Co Louth.  Occupation Mill Hand.  Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin Winifred Anne Fagan, 120 King Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, mother. (There are other earlier attestation papers dated 9 November 1914 (X 2) and 1 March 1915  which nominate his next-of-kin as his father William John Fagan, with indecipherable addresses in London (1914), Ireland (also 1914),  and also Wool Exchange, King Street, Melbourne,  Australia . Served in Gallipoli September to November 1915, then to hospital in Alexandria, Egypt for one week, returning to service. Admitted again to hospital, enteric fever, November 1915.  To Australia January 1916, then to England July 1916. Absent without leave 20 October 1916 to 21 October 1916. Awarded 2 days Field Punishment no. 2, and forfeited 3 days pay. To France December 1916. March 10, 1917, Awarded one day Field Punishment No 1 for failing to appear on parade on the evening of 8 March 1917. Wounded 14 March 1917 in the upper arm. To England 19 March 1917.  Awarded 168 hours detention for (1) At Southampton, not complying with an order  25 July 1917 and (2) whilst a patient breaking out of hospital.  Absent without leave 18 August 1917 to 21 August  1917, awarded 7 days confinement and forfeited 6 days pay. Back in France October 1917. In hospital England, December 1917, choroiditis. Returned to Australia March 1918, defective vision. Discharged 28 September 1918 (defective vision). Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

The following interesting letter from Michael Fagan to his father is on his file. It was probably censored and never delivered as it is critical of the conditions in Gallipoli and Alexandria

 

No 15 General Hospital

Alexandria

Egypt

Nov 29, 1916.

Dear Father

Just a few lines, to let you know how I am getting on. As you know I was unlucky enough to get Enteric fever. I was first taken bad with dysentery & as you know yourself that is a thing to make anybody weak & then it turned into enteric. I was in the field hospital for a week and then I was sent aboard a hospital ship and I can tell you, I was pretty bad but I did not like leaving the Peninsula through sickness but it could not be helped. I did not realise what I had been through until I got aboard that ship with all its comforts and kind nurses. I was a bit different to living in a hole in the ground with nothing but biscuits and tinned meat to live on. Well father by the time you get this letter I will be in England in fact I will be leaving here in less than a week as I have over a fortnight in bed and I am feeling as well as ever. I would not have been bad on the Peninsula if they had only fed us better. We used to do 24 hrs in the trenches and 24 out but while we were out we were using the pick and shovel all we got out of it was one night in bed out of two. The worst part of the trenches was keeping awake at night. We had to do one hour observation  by turns with head over the parapet and then you could hear lead flying and were always glad when day broke. I9t) used to be great fun watching the damage done by the ships. We would hear a big shell coming through the air and we would bob our heads up  and see jackos trenches smothered in smoke and dust. I sometimes used to pity the poor devils in them, I know I would not like to be in their shoes & my best chum was very unlucky he was hit by shrapnel the first day we went into the trenches but I saw a good many young fellows go the same way. We used to get absolutely callous taking no notice of most awful sights they were an every- day occurrence. I have 9 months service now I am getting quite an old soldier & I will be glad when this war is over and we will be able to come home once more. I will have a tidy cheque to collect and it will help you along a bit. Well father I have not much more to say to hoping to find you all in best of health & spirits.

I remain your loving son

 

FAGAN, JOHN, 25 Battery Royal Field Artillery. From Camp Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FALCONER, 3rd Engineer, JOHN, SS Ranza. From Upper Merches, Dundalk.

A thrilling story of the torpedoing of a merchant vessel by a German submarine was told to a “Democrat” representative during the week by a young man, Mr John Falconer, Upper Merches, who is spending a holiday at home after an adventurous time aboard a British merchant steamer. Mr Falconer, who is 22 years of age, served some years in Messrs Manisty’s Iron Works, and on the 12th of July of this year joined the S.S. Ranza a vessel owned by Messrs Barnes, Cardiff, and registered n London. His first trip to sea was on the evening of Wednesday, July 28th, when as third engineer of the “Ranza” he formed one of the crew that manned that vessel on her trip from Newcastle to Gibraltar with coal. On the ship were 24 men all told.

All went well until Sunday morning, August 1st, when about 48 miles South-West of Ushant the crew of the merchant vessel observed a German submarine a quarter of a mile off engaged in shelling a steamer. Those on board the Ranza made for their boats as the observed the U68 – as the submarine proved to be – making straight for their vessel. All on board got safely into two boats which the vessel carried and awaited developments. The submarine drew alongside the vessel, and without a word of warning torpedoed  her. In a very short time the Ranza had gone down. Together in the boat with Mr Falconer was Captain Pugh and twelve others. The remainder of the crew were in the second life-boat. After discharging the torpedo the submarine drew alongside the life-boat. It was a remarkably large submarine, and was equipped with three four-inch guns. It was painted grey and black. On its deck were 14 men. The commander – an old man with a long beard turning grey, who spoke English fluently – inquired from Capt. Pugh the name of the vessel torpedoed, her destination, the nature of her cargo, etc. On these particulars being supplied to him he cleared off with the remark “safe return to England, and kind regards to King George”. The plight of the thirteen men huddled together in a small boat almost full of water adrift in a raging sea can be imagined. Behind in the Ranza had been left all the belongings of the crew, the only thought being to get clear of the vessel before the German torpedo found its mark. In a short time the boat filled with water, and the men possessed nothing with which to bail it. Shortly after she capsized. All thirteen held to the boat, and after a trying experience turned it over. They were not long in the boat before she filled a second time and again capsized. This time one of the men held on to his seat to save himself and in doing to was covered by the upturned boat. He was pulled out by his companions and everything possible was done for him, but he was dead. For four long hours the little boat was tossed to and fro in a wild sea, and the condition of the men, soaked with water, without food, prostrate with fatigue and on the verge of despair of rescue – was lamentable. As time passed their condition became worse and one of the number almost died.  At six in the evening a fishing smack from Chancey picked up the men and landed them at Isle de Groix. When aboard the smack they were treated with great kindness, and were given dry clothes and food. From Isle de Groix they were taken to Lorient and thence to St. Malo, where nine of the crew of the Ranza had already been landed. They had undergone a similar thrilling experience; their boat had capsized twice, and two of their number had been lost. They were picked yup by a Dutch steamer. On Thursday what remained of the crew sailed to Southampton, and Mr Falconer arrived in Dundalk on Saturday evening last. He speaks in great praise of the treatment meted out to them by the French people with whom they came in contact. Everything possible was done for their comfort. On the Dutch steamer which saved portion of the crew of the “Ranza” was a wireless installation, and the names of the men saved were at once despatched to England. When Mr Falconer arrived in Lorient he was unable to inform his relatives of his escape, his only assets being a suit of wet clothes and 91/2 d! The captain of the “Ranza” and another of the crew identified the commander of the submarine as a man who had previous to the war, captained a trading vessel which made several trips to Newcastle-on-Tyne.

For weather-beaten sailors the experience would have been exciting enough, for a young man on his first trip, it was a bitter introduction to the sea.

(Dundalk Democrat, 14 August 1915)

 

Ranza: Gross tonnage 2320. Built 1902. Sunk on 1 August,  1915. Captured and torpedoed in the Atlantic 50 miles S.W. from Ushant by the German submarine U 28 whilst on a voyage from Tyne to Gibraltar with a cargo of coal. 3 lost. (Tennent)

 

FANNING, Private, R, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

(Robert Fanning from Castlebellingham listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FARNON, Lieutenant, LAURENCE, Royal Navy. From Church Street, Dundalk.

During the week Naval Engineer Lieut. Laurence Farnon, of Church Street, has been home on a short holiday. For some time past he has been in the Special Service Squadron doing duty at the Dardanelles, and while at Malta on his way home he say Lieut J P Lavery who, he states, is looking fit and well. Lieut Farnon himself does not look anything the worse for the exacting service on which he has been engaged. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 June 1915)

           

Dundalk officer’s promotion – Lieut L Farnon R N, son of Mrs Farnon, Church Street, Dundalk, has been appointed engineer lieutenant-commander of the Royal Hellenic Navy. (Dundalk Democrat, 31 August 1918)

 

FARQUHARSON, Major, W, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FARRELL, HUGH, lived at 80 George’s Street, Drogheda, in accommodation owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

FARRELL, JAMES, Royal Irish Rifles. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

FARRELL, THOMAS,  1039590, 239 Railway Construction Corps,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force . Born 27 February 1874, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin, Mary Jane Farrell, 8 Cross Street, Waterloo, Nr Liverpool, England, mother. Attested on 18 September 1916 at Montreal, Canada.

 

FARRELLY, Sergeant,  MATTHEW ALOYSIUS, 5300, 28 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force.  Born Drogheda, Co Louth. Enlisted 1 January 1916, age 29. Occupation Labourer.  Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Ruby Farrelly, Burt Street North, Perth, West Australia, wife.  Served in France from November 1916 to August 1918. Gunshot wound left hand June 1917, in hospital for three months. September 11, 1917, minor offences including failure to wear belt and having in his possession a pass to which he was not entitled and which was expired, severely reprimanded. To France December 1917. Gunshot would  leg, severe,  28 August 1918, in hospital four months, invalided home to Australia. Discharged 5 May 1919. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal. Also awarded the Military Medal

28 Battalion, 5300 Sgt. M.A. Farrelly : 5878 Cpl A.V. Holt

During the attack East on Villiers Bretonneux, near Amiens on the 8/8/18 these two  N.C.O.s rushed a German Machine Gun that was firing on our troops. They captured it killing six of the crew  and taking six prisoners.  This act enabled the advance to continue.

Published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No 61, dated 23 May 1919.

 Sergeant Farrelly died in Australia 22 March 1943. Enquiries were made in 1952 on behalf of the estate of his sister Mrs Margaret Lyons, recently of Liverpool. 

 1901 Census, at house no 9 Thomas Street, Drogheda,  Mathew Farrelly age 15, occupation Telegraph Messenger, son of  Patrick, age 64 and Fate age 45. There are six other siblings, including Margaret Farrelly, age 23, daughter . 

 

FARRELLY, NICHOLAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Duleek Street, Drogheda.

 

FAY, PATRICK. From Bolton Street, Drogheda. See William Fay below.

 

FAY, Sergeant, WILLIAM, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Bolton Street, Drogheda.

            Another Drogheda soldier honoured

Sergeant William Fay, Royal Dublin Fusiliers a native of Bolton Street, Drogheda, where his people still reside, has been awarded the parchment certificate of the Irish Brigade for gallant conduct and devotion to duty. Sergeant Fay has been at the front in France for the past 12 months, and has a brother Patrick Fay, also serving at the front. The certificate is as follows:-

The Irish Brigade

– “ 16716 Sergt W Fay, 8th Royal Dublin Fusiliers. I have read with much  pleasure the reports of your Regimental Commander and Brigade Commander regarding your gallant conduct and constant devotion to duty in the field in1916, and have ordered your name and deed to be entered to be entered in the record of the Irish Division – W B Hickie, Major-General commanding 16th Irish Division.

            (Drogheda Argus, 19 May, 1917)

 

FEATHERSTONE, Colour Sergeant Major, J. Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

FEARON, JAMES, 3084699, 1 Depot Battalion, 1 Quebec Regiment. Address, 8 Oliver Street, Sherbrooke,  Quebec, Canada. Born 10 November 1892, Omeath, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Occupation Paper Maker. Next-of-kin, Mrs Annie Fearon, Omeath, Co Louth, mother. Drafted on 22 May 1918, at Montreal, Canada. 

 

FEARON, T. From 2 Defender’s Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

Lance-Corporal, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

FEARON, TERENCE, 2010861, Canadian Engineers, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address  66 Dudley Street, Roxbury, Mass. USA. Born 8 August 1884,  Co Louth, Ireland. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Steamfitter’s Helper. Next-of kin Ann Fearon, Corakitt, Anneath (sic)(Omeath),  Louth, mother. Attested on 21 May 1918, Toronto, Canada.

 

FEE, JOHN J, Irish Guards. From Lannett, Corcreaghy, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FEEHAN, PATRICK, from Mansfieldtown. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FEELY, Private, PATRICK, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 2 St Mary’s Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FENTON, Trooper, ROBERT, North Irish Horse. From 37 Dublin Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FERGUSON, HUGH GEORGE, born Dundalk, Co Louth. Next-of-kin Emily Ferguson, 56 Sussex Street, Pimlico, London. Age 49, occupation Labourer. Previous military experience,  seventeen years and six months in  4 Queen’s Own Hussars. Church of England. Enlisted 9 December 1914, discharged 26 December 1914.

 

FERGUSON, JAMES, 160255,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force .  Born 9 February 1876, Castletowncooley, Cooley, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Waiter. Next-of-kin, Lydia Ferguson,  429 Campbell Avenue, Vancouver, wife. Pervious military service, served for 9 months in the 69th New York Regiment during the Spanish-American War. Attested on 24 September 1915 at Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

 

FERGUSON, Sergeant, MICHAEL, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Lower Faughart, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FERNIE, JAMES SMART, 736755, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Hanna, Alberta. Born 8 May 1891, Drogheda,  Westmeath, Ireland (sic). Religious affiliation Presbyterian. Occupation Student. Next-of-kin, Mrs John Fernie,  Rosemount, Tramore, Co Waterford, mother. Attested 20 March 1916, Hanna, Alberta, Canada.

 

FINLAY, ARCHBALD, 2777261, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 1092 Francis Street,  London, Ontario, Canada. Born  4 February 1882, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Groom and Horseman.  Next-of-kin, Elizabeth Finlay, 1092 Francis Street,  London, Ontario, Canada, wife. Attested on 4 May 1916 at London, Ontario, Canada.

 

FINLAY, JOHN, A1458, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth, 8 May 1882. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Labourer. Next-of-kin,  Robert Finlay,  381 Eva Street, London, Ontario, Canada, brother. Attested on 10 May 1915 at London, Ontario, Canada.

 

FINN, Private, J, 1 Battalion Irish Guards. From John Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FINNEGAN, CHARLES, from Dromin and Stabannon. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FINNEGAN, JOHN E, ‘of running fame’, from Dromin (wounded at Suvla). (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FINNEGAN, JOSEPH, from Dromin. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FINNEGAN, PATRICK JOSEPH, 2591272, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Address 84 Inkerman Street, London, Ontario, Canada. Born 5 December, 1893, Knockbridge, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic.  Occupation Ice-Cream Maker. Next-of-kin, James Finnegan, Tallanstown, Co Louth, father. Attested on 29 October 1917, at London, Ontario, Canada. 

 

FINNEY, PETER, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mell.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

FITZGERALD, Seaman, HMS Patia, Royal Navy. From Barrack Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FITZPATRICK,  JAMES JOSEPH,  769604, Artillery Brigade Depot, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   48 Simcoe Street, Toronto, Canada. Born  15 January 1894, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin, Alice Fitzpatrick, Grangebellew, Co Louth, mother.  Previous military experience, private no 769604, six months, 124th Battalion. Drafted on 20 November 1917 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

 

FITZPATRICK, MICHAEL, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Advertiser,15 January 1916)

 

FITZPATRICK, Private, P. Royal Irish Rifles. From Ardee. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916 also Drogheda Independent, 3 June 1916).

 

FITZPATRICK, Winchman, THOMAS, from Nicholas Street, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat attack, 14 October 1918.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

FITZPATRICK, WILLIAM, R F R (Royal Fusiliers?). From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

FITZPATRICK, PATRICK, Royal Naval Reserve. From Dunleer district. ‘Was in “Cressy” battle.’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916) (HMS Aboukir, Hogue and Cressy were sunk by a German U-Boat, U9 on 22 September 1914)

 

FLANAGAN, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

FLANAGAN, Corporal, JAMES, 6 Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. From 14 Mary Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FLANAGAN, Corporal, William, Royal Army Medical Corps. From 14 Mary Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FLEMING, ELIZABETH JEAN,  22 Cavalry  Field Ambulance, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   St Chads, C.H., Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Born 9 June 1891, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Presbyterian. Occupation Nurse. Next-of-kin  Lieutenant P P Fleming, Kelliher,  Saskatchewan, Canada, father. Attested  1 July 1918, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 

 

FLEMING, Lance-Corporal, M, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 September 1916)

 

FLEMING, ROBERT, ‘A’ Company, 28 Battalion Canadians. From 81 Park Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

According to the Attestation Papers, dates 23 October 1914, Robert Fleming was born in Dundalk on 26 November 1879. He was 34 years and 11 months at enlistment. His occupation was a clerk and he was unmarried. Next of kin was given as Mrs M Brownlee, 81 Park Street, Dundalk. He was in the local militia, and served 6 weeks garrison duty in the 96th Regiment. He was 5 feet, 7 and a half inches high, with a dark complexion , light hazel eyes and black hair. He was a member of the Church of England.

 

FLEMING, THOMAS. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

FLEMING, Company Quarter-Master Sergeant, THOMAS, Machine Gun Corps. From The Dale, Drogheda. Commander of ‘B’ company, Drogheda Volunteers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

Drogheda soldier honoured – Co Q M S Thomas Fleming, No 48154, 31st Company, Machine Gun Corps, Salonica Forces, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty in the field.

(Drogheda  Independent, 15 September 1917)

           

The Military Medal has also been won by Company Quarter Master Sergeant Thomas Fleming of the Machine Gun Corps, attached to the Salonica Front. Sergeant Fleming is a native of the Dale, Drogheda, and has seen a great deal of active service both in France and Salonica. The news of his success has elicited much satisfaction in his native town, where he is known as an efficient and courageous soldier. He too deserves congratulations on his gallantry and devotion to duty. (Drogheda Argus, 15 September 1917)

 

FLOOD, EDWARD, Section A, New Zealand Medical Corps. From Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

We hear that Mr Eddie Flood, eldest son of Dr E F Flood, J P, is on his way to France with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Mr Flood went to New Zealand a couple of years ago on the advice of his doctors after a temporary breakdown in health, and, thanks to an active life in an invigorating climate, he has grown strong and robust. In New Zealand all young men have to join the territorial defence force. It is from this little army, already trained, that the Expeditionary Force has been sent to France and, as we have said, it is Mr Eddie Flood’s fortune to be attached to the medical corps of the machine gun detachment. We hope to hear him tell the tale of his campaigning experiences before many months are over. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 October 1914)

           

Mr Eddie Flood, eldest son of Dr. E F Flood, is home for a brief furlough. Mr Flood is a member of the Medical Corps of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, which has played so splendid a part in the Gallipoli campaign. As our readers will remember he had almost finished his medical course when, a couple of years ago, a breakdown in health rendered it advisable that he should remove  to a warmer climate. His medical training consequently made him an extremely useful member of the Colonial Corps, and since the beginning of the Gallipoli campaign, he has rendered splendid service.  AS the New Zealand Force, until the late landing of the 10th Irish Division at Suvla, held only a narrow strip of rocky coast on the west of the peninsula – the advance trenches being only a short distance inland from the cliffs on which the New Zealanders made their daring and precarious landing – the members of the ambulance and medical corps have been practically all the time in the firing line and in daily touch with the deeds of heroism that have won for the New Zealanders so splendid a reputation. The many friends of Mr. Flood and his family will be glad to know that he is in vigorous health and the cheeriest of spirits.

(Dundalk Democrat, 18 September 1915)

 

FLOOD, Private, J. Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

FLOOD, Private, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Collon. ‘In training in Cork’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916).

 

FLOOD, THOMAS, Castlebellingham

On 24 December 1922, a convoy of National Army troops was engaged on follow-up searches for Irregulars in the Castlebellingham area. Having difficulty in locating one of the houses which they wished to search, one group of soldiers came upon Jack Doyle, took him up in a lorry, and either forced him or persuaded him to show them their target. Jack Doyle was an ex British soldier from Castlebellingham. On the morning of 29 December Jack Doyle was found at Lynns, near Annagassan, by Thomas Flood, himself an ex-soldier, shot six or seven times. There was a card with the words “convicted spy” on his chest. The inquest jury found that Doyle was ‘foully murdered by some person or persons unknown’. (extract from unpublished PhD thesis, Violence and political factionalism and their affects on North Louth 1874-1943, Donal Hall (Maynooth, 2009))

(Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

FLYNN, Lieutenant, O A, Leinster Regiment. Worked in Hibernian Bank, Dundalk. Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

The eldest son of Mr J J Flynn, J P, late manager of the Hibernian Bank, Dundalk, has received a commission in the Leinster Regiment. Lieutenant Flynn received his early education at St. Mary’s College, Dundalk, and is a graduate of Trinity. He is well known here as a good all-round sportsman, a keen cricketer, and equally prominent on the football field and on the golf links.

 (Dundalk Democrat, 23 January 1915)

 

Some of our young Dundalk men who joined the army in the past year are just gone to the front. They include Lieuts. Roe, Brown, Flynn and Hall who are all serving in the same Irish Battalion. Surgeon Lavery has also gone to France to join the medical corps there. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

FLYNN, Stoker, Royal Navy, PATRICK. From Dungooley, Kilcurry, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

FOLEY, Private, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Albert Place, Dundalk. Wounded and missing. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

FOLEY, Private, J. Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

FOLEY, Private, P, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From 25 Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FORBES, J, Irish Guards. From Lurgangreen, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FORSYTHE, Gunner, G H, D Battalion, 54 Brigade. From 17 Euston Street, Greenore. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FOSTER, Sergeant, JAMES A, 8 Hussars. From Educational Institution. Missing.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

FOSTER, Sir VERE, of Glyde Court, Co. Louth.

Not a few fine young men have left Dundalk during the last month or so to join the Irish Guards or other regiments for service during the war. Many of these young men are of a class well described as “comfortable”, and they joined the army at this crises because they believed it a duty upon them to bear a hand in checking the German menace. They went without any drum-beating or flag waving, but not without abundant good wishes for their safety through the imminent perils of war. When our well-known public men volunteer for active service they cannot slip away unnoticed. This week Louth has sent away three such men – Sir Vere Foster, Chairman of the Ardee Board of Guardians, who has gone for training with the Norfolk Yeomanry; Mr W A Doran Chairman of the Louth County Council, who has enlisted in the new Irish Brigade, and Mr S H Moynagh, solicitor, Vice-chairman of the urban Council, who has joined the Rugby battalion of the Dublin Fusiliers. This trio represents a very notable contribution to the new army. We think everybody – even the few who pretend they are Pro-German (but are in their secret hearts nothing of the kind) – will compliment these recruits on their pluck: especially in having “listed” in the rank and file instead of seeking the softer billets to which their position and education would entitle them. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 November 1914)

 

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

FOWLKES, Pioneer, J T, Royal Engineers. From Louth. Reported wounded

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

FOX, Gunner, PETER, Royal Field Artillery. From Hackballscross, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

FRAZER, GEORGE H, B.A., TCD, Royal Army Medical Corps. Son of Mrs Frazer, St Peter’s Place, Drogheda. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

FRECKLETON, WILLIAM, Royal Army Medical Corps. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

FULLERTON, ROBERT, 5 Lancers. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

FULTON, VICTOR,  187573, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   Brandon, Manitoba.  Born 22 May 1891, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Grocer. Next-of-kin, Victor Fulton, Park Street, Dundalk, father. Attested on 12 November 1915,  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

 

GAFFNEY, Private, J, postman. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GAFFNEY, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From King Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 GALBRAITH, Second-Lieutenant, HUGH. From Drogheda

Drogheda officer wounded. Second Lieut-Hugh Galbraith, Drogheda, who was recently awarded a Parchment Certificate for gallant conduct and devotion to duty, was wounded on Friday week in the German offensive.

(Drogheda Independent, 13 April 1918)

 

GALLAGHER, JOSEPH, 48 Toronto Highlanders.. Formerly of Drogheda, served in the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders. Volunteered in Toronto for service with Canadian Expeditionary Force. Now in France with his regiment, the 48th Toronto Highlanders.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

GALLAGHER, JOSEPH, 47353, 219 Nova Scotia Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 22 January 1879, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Meat Salesman. Next-of-kin Catherine Gallagher, 1 Bolton Street, Drogheda. Previous military service in the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders.  Attested on 28 September 1914, Valcartier, Quebec, Canada. 

 

GARDNER, Acting Corporal, F. Royal Engineers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

GARGAN, A, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GARGAN, EDWARD. Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Blackbull, Drogheda. Member of ‘B’ Company Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GARNETT, J, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GARTLAN, Captain, GERALD, Royal Irish Rifles.

Mr Alex Gartlan, Sessional Crown Solicitor for Co. Louth, has received a telegram from the War Office informing him that his son, Capt Gerald Gartlan, staff officer Royal Irish Rifles, has been wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat,  8 July 1916)

 

GARLAND,  Private,  11708, CHRISTOPHER,  Enlisted in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, 18 August 1914. Served with British Expeditionary Force in France from 25 October 1914 to 15 April 1915. Returned to England and joined the 5th Battalion RIF. With the 5th Battalion, 31st Brigade, 10th Irish Division, landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, Turkey. Transferred to the Machinegun Corps (31st MG Coy) on 12 May 1916 Number 48037. Served with British Expeditionary Force in Mediterranean (Gallipoli, Salonika, Palestine) 23 April 1915 to 9 March 1919.  Transferred to the Royal Irish Fusiliers 11 April 1919.  Served in Mesopotamia (Persia), 18 September 1919 to 19 May 1921. Served in Egypt  20 May 1921 to 17 December 1921. Transferred to Section B Army Reserve 24 December 1921. Discharged 2 October 1923.

Awarded a 1914 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Understood to have enlisted and served with Sgt.  Joseph King, Castlebellingham until the latter was killed in action in Palestine, September/October 1918.

Son of Michael and Anne Garland, who in the 1911 Census are shown as living in House 5, Castlebellingham. Co Louth. (Source: Pat Garland, USA, son of Christopher)

(Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

GARTLAND, Private, EDWARD, Royal Army Service Corps. From Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

GARLAND, JAMES. In army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GARRETT, Captain, GEORGE, Quartermaster 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment. Retired on pension on completion of service after the last training at Mosney Camp. Volunteered for active service on the outbreak of war. Retained as instructor because of his great capabilities in this respect, and appointed for the purpose to Chatham.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GARRY, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Green Lanes, Drogheda. Member of ‘C’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GASKIN, JAMES, Royal Engineers. From The Annies, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

GARVEY, MICHAEL, 510872, 2 Overseas Army Service Corps, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 596 Cass Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Born 9 September 1888,  Dundalk. Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation  Mechanic. . Next-of-kin Mrs Bridget Garvey,  8 Belmore Street, Belfast, mother.  Attested on 29 March 1916 at Windsor, Ontario

 

GEOGHEGAN, Private, Irish Guards. From Termonfeckin.

Private Geoghegan, of the Irish Guards, a native of Termonfeckin, near Drogheda, has returned a few days ago to his native place on short leave of absence on order to recuperate after being wounded in the great battle fought at Ypres where the Prussian Imperial Guards were decimated in the furious charge made by the Irish Guards. He gives a vivid narrative of that stirring and eventful episode. A comrade of his, a native of Termonfeckin named McDonnell, who was close by his side on the occasion, was killed.

The German batteries poured showers of grape and shrapnel, and the advancing Prussians in close formation filled the air with rifle bullets. The Irish Guards were ordered to withhold their fire. Onward came the Prussian Imperial Guards, in close ranks, like a moving wall, cheering with levelled bayonets. They, on near approach, appeared to be all tall, brawny, broad-shouldered men, in resplendent uniforms. The Irish Guards then got the order to “fix bayonets”. With a fervent, hasty prayer, the Irish responded, and at the word “fire!” they delivered a withering fire from their repeating rifles and then dashed at the enemy. The bayonets of both sides crossed, but it was only momentarily, for the Prussian Guards broke, scattered and fled, with the Irish Guards in hot pursuit, aided by the fire of mitrailleuses, maxims, and cannon from the British side. The loss of the Irish Guards in killed and wounded was severe, but that of the enemy was awful. Their dead and wounded were in countless heaps. Private Geoghegan received three wounds from shrapnel, one in the cheek, shoulder and leg. He is fast recovering and hopes to rejoin his regiment in a few days. Describing the destructive effect of the German shells he states that one of them makes a hole in the earth six feet deep and twelve yards square, sending up clouds of mud, earth and stones. The German artillery is very destructive, but their rifle fire is very ineffective, except at very close range. During the bayonet charge many of the Irish Guards had their bayonets twisted, crookened and broken, from impact with the enemy, and their rifle butts were used as weapons with terrific effect. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 January 1915)

 

GEOGHAN, Lance-Corporal, J, Irish Guards. From Dunleer. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 4 November 1916).

 

GIBNEY, M, Irish Guards. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GIBNEY, M, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Of the L and Y Railway Company (Drogheda). (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GIBNEY, MATTHEW, HMS Carlisle. From Batchelor’s Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GIBNEY, THOMAS. Royal Irish Rifles. From Rope Walk, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GIBNEY, WILLIAM, 198511, 94 Overseas Battalion,  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address, Fort Frances, Ontario, Canada. Born 17 March,  1887, Dundalk Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Labourer.  Next-of-kin Mrs Margaret Gibney, Park Street, Dundalk. Co Louth, mother.  Previous military service in the Royal Irish Fusiliers. Attested 15 December 1915 at Fort Frances, Ontario, Canada.  Attestation form overwritten with the words “Deserted  31 March, 1916”.

 

GILBERT, Sergeant, BERTIE, Royal Engineers attached to the Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GILBERT, WILLIAM, 19 Cadet Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Lieutenant,  18 Royal Irish Rifles (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

GILMORE, HUGH PATRICK,  2014901, Canadian Engineers, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   Albers Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA. Born 15 August 1877, Co Louth, Ireland. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Rail Road Constriction/Lumberjack. Next-of-kin, Peter Gilmore, Louth PO, Co Louth, brother.  Attested on  10 September 1918 at Montreal, Canada.

 

GILMORE, T. From Castletown Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GINNETTY,  PATRICK PAUL, 3105134, 1st Reserve Battalion,  2 C Q Regiment, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address Joralemon Street, Brooklyn, New York, USA.  Born 12 September 1882, Drogheda, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Marine Engineer. Next-of-kin, Margaret Ginnetty, 18 Faulkner Street, Liverpool,  England, mother.  Previous military experience, three years sapper in Royal Engineers.  Attested on 4 October, 1917 at Toronto, Canada.

 

GLOVER, Lieutenant-Colonel, GEORGE T, Royal Engineers. Worked in Great Northern Railways, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

It is announced in the press that Mr G T Glover, loco superintendent of the GNR at Dundalk, has accepted a Major’s commission in the Royal Engineers. It is said that Major Glover is to take over the management of a railway “somewhere in France.” This, we hope, does not mean more than a temporary severance of his connection with Dundalk, where he has been as esteemed by the Company’s men of all grades as by the directors. The Works have been improved and extended in many directions since he took over control: and altogether he is far too good a man to lose. (Dundalk Democrat, 13 January 1917)

           

Last week’s par as to Mr G T Glover was inaccurate in some respect. His new post is that of chief mechanical engineer on the staff of the Director General of military railways in France, and his military rank is Lieut-Col. Royal Engineers. There are hundreds of miles of temporary lines in France and there could be no more energetic or capable man in charge of the rolling stock than Lieut-Col Glover. (Dundalk Democrat, 20 January 1917)

 

GOGAN, JAMES, Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. Wounded in action.  

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

GOGARTY, RICHARD, King’s Royal Liverpool Regiment. From Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GONNOLLY, Private, B, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From 17 Ladywell Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GOODFELLOW, W J,  HMS Seal.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GOODLOW, GEORGE, from Castlebellingham. In the navy. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

GOODMAN, Sergeant, JOHN, 2 Battalion Irish Guards. From 7 Faughart Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Promoted Lieutenant (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

In the battalion of the Irish Guards now undergoing training there are over forty Dundalk lads. One of them, a son of J W Turner, has been raised to non-commissioned rank. Amongst the others who ought to climb the military ladder are Jack Goodman and Patrick Rooney. The latter was assistant teacher in Dromiskin when the war broke out. We notice a statement in yesterday’s papers that owing to the failure of the Educational Authorities to provide substitutes or pay for teachers volunteering, only one Irish National Teacher has joined the colours. Apparently this is Mr Rooney. His uncle holds a captains commission in the artillery, having risen to that rank by sheer merit.

(Dundalk Democrat, 29 November 1914)

 

A well-attended “smoker” was held by the members of Dundalk C.Y.M.S. on Tuesday, the guest of the evening being Mr Jack Goodman, one of their members, who had volunteered for active service in the Irish Guards. The Spiritual Director of the Society, Rev Father Kerr, presided. The Chairman, on rising to propose the toast of “Our Guest” said they had all known Mr Goodman very intimately: he had all the qualities that a Catholic young ma should have, and he had proved himself in every way a worthy member. He (the speaker) had always had an instinctive regard and reverence for the soldier. The soldier was a man of courage, a man who was not afraid to risk his life for his fellows, and when a young man joined the army he showed he was a man of courage (applause).

Mr Augustine Roche, M P, who was heartily received, said his sympathies were with this brave young soldier who was going to fight their battle, because it was their battle, and there should be no mistake about it. When he saw a young soldier now he had as great respect for him as for a priest. He hoped to have the pleasure of coming to Dundalk to welcome Mr. Goodman when he returned. There was an element – The Sinn Fein party. He thought they called it; it was a very small party – who were opposed to Irishmen joining the army. The Irish Party, however, including Messrs Redmond, Dillon and Devlin, were very good judges, after their lifelong services in the Irish cause as to the right policy. The treatment of Ireland had been shocking in the past, but a change had come over things 9Applause).

Mr James McCourt said he was very proud to be there to pay honour and respect to the brave and fearless Jack Goodman. His father had been the speaker’s colleague in all the movements for the advancement of the Irish cause in Dundalk. He didn’t think this was the time for any man in Ireland to raise the questions of the past government of this country, but later on they would have plenty of men in Ireland to protect their cause and bring the issue to a successful conclusion. They might leave themselves in the hands of Mr John Redmond (applause).

Mr S H Moynagh said the connection between Jack Goodman and himself extended over a long period. He had joined the colours as Mr Goodman had done, who was accepted, and he was pronounced physically unfit. Mr Goodman goes on to glory and honour, while he was left behind.

Mr B Hamill J P, said Belgium was a little Catholic country with a large population. They all felt for the Belgians, and if it was only on that account and what had been done against them. Catholic Irishmen should be willing to help them. They had with them the heads of the Church, who were their directors in more ways than one, and when they were with them they were on the winning side (applause).

Rev Father M’Keone, C C, said he was glad that Mr Goodman had taken a man’s part – of course he was a very young man – in fighting this battle, which was a battle for civilisation. In olden times in the fight against a powerful nation by the Crusaders the young men of every country in Europe flocked to the colours. The men  who were fighting today on the side of the Allies were as truly fighting for liberty and religion as were the Crusaders. They would be in a far worse position when the war was over with regard to the Home Rule position, if they had taken up the attitude they had adopted during the Boer war.

Rev Father Hurson C C said he wished to be associated with the tribute thaw was being paid to Mr Goodman, who was about to strike a blow in defence of liberty.

The Chairman with a few appropriate words, then presented Mr Goodman with a handsome silver cross with chain, on behalf of the members.

Mr Goodman said that from a limited vocabulary he failed to pick words to express his gratitude for this kind gift, which he would always carry with him. As a follower of their leader, he thought he had only answered  to the call of “fall in”  sounded by Mr John Redmond (applause). He recounted some of the deeds of the Irish Guards which he had joined, and said he hoped he would be in the next charge, and when they sang “God save Ireland” he would shout as hard as the next (applause)

A varied programme was then proceeded with, among those who contributed to the success of the evening being Messrs M’Ardle, M’Parland, P.O’Connell, P Hamill, Coburn, Maye, A Roche, M P, B Hamill, J P, E Goodman, M C C, James M’Court, T and J Goodman. Mr Siraux presided at the piano.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 March 1915)

 

Sergeant Jack Goodman, of the Irish Guards, eldest son of the late Mr Edward Goodman, has come home on leave. He was in the trenches when news of his father’s last illness and death reached him simultaneously; and it was quite impossible to reach home in time for the funeral. Sergeant Goodman is in splendid form physically and shews no trace of the hardships the men in the trenches had to undergo during the winter. (Dundalk Democrat, 8 April 1916)

 

We hear that Sergt. Jack Goodman of the Irish Guards (son of the late Mr Ned Goodman, Co. Co.) has been recommended for a commission – an honour that has been awarded a good many Irish non-coms lately. Jack Goodman deserves it, if any man does. He was one of the first local men to volunteer into the Irish Guards after the outbreak of the war. He has seen continuous active service since finishing his training; and his efficiency, steadiness and bravery won him sergeant’s stripes long since. Such a man ought to make a first-rate officer. (Dundalk Democrat, 9 September 1916)

 

Lieutenant Jack Goodman is home on leave for a few days. Like many other lads who have given up civil life of the soldier he has developed extraordinarily in stature as well as breadth. He is certainly a standing example of the superiority of the ‘simple life’ of the trenches in which he has spent so many months.

(Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

            We notice Lieut. Jack Goodman home on leave

(Dundalk Democrat, 20 January 1917)

 

GORDON, Sister. From Kincora Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GOSS, MICHAEL, Guards Division, Ambulance Column, Royal Field Artillery. From 11 St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916) Wounded (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

GOVER, Sergeant-Drummer, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GOVERS, JACK. Leinster Regiment. From Mell, Drogheda. Member of ‘D’ Company, Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GOW, W T R, Royal Field Artillery. From Clermont, Dundalk.  (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GRAY, Private, ALFRED H, Royal Army Medical Corps.

Private Alfred H Gray, son of Mr Geo Gray, Dundalk, has received a parchment certificate signed by Major-General Robertson, commanding 17th Division “in recognition of his conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in driving a motor ambulance over bad roads and through heavy shell fire during the period 21st to 27th March, 1918.” This was the highly critical time of the German breakthrough near St. Quentin, when the British forces were driven back by the concentrated fury of the first big German offensive. Private Gray, who is attached to the RAMC as an ambulance driver, was constantly engaged under fire in bringing back wounded men, and repeatedly during the retreat he was actually behind the retiring line of British troops and between the contending armies. Strange to say he escaped without a scratch though in this and other big scraps he has been “in the thick of it.” (Dundalk Democrat, 3 August 1918)

 

GRAY, CHARLES, Royal Irish Rifles (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GRAY, F V, Royal Irish Rifles (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GRAY, Private, J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Louth. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916)

 

GRAY, P J, from 4 Williamson’s Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GRAY, Driver, B, Guards Division, Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery. From William Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GRAY, MICHAEL, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GRAY, Private, R. Leinster Regiment. From Dundalk.

Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916).

Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

GRAY, WILLIAM JAMES, 3106252, 1st Depot Battalion, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment.  Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address: 325 East 29th Street, New York City, USA. Born 29 November 1885, Drogheda Co Louth.   Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Steel Worker. Next-of-kin,  Mary Gray, 16 Singleton Cottages, Drogheda, Co Louth, mother. Attested on  27 December 1917, Toronto, Canada.

 

GRAYSON, EVELYNE, Voluntary Aid Detachment (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GREEN, J,  London Post Office Rifles. From Quay Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GREEN, Private, S, Royal Irish Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 7 September 1916)

 

GREENE, ANNISON, Inniskilling Dragoons. From The Alleys, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

GREENE, Private, BERNARD, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Mary Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

GREENE, Private, LOUIS, ‘A’ Company, 2 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers. Second son of Mr E Greene, North Quay, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

In the recent heavy fighting, Private Louis Greene, at present attached to the Royal Irish Regiment, was severely wounded and his father, Mr Edward Greene, North Quay, Drogheda, has been notified that he was transferred to the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, last week. Private Greene saw service in the Indian Frontier, and was treated for frost bite at St. Omer’s hospital, France, in the beginning of the war. A year after he suffered from gas poisoning, for which he was successfully treated at the War Hospital, Edinburgh.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 16 September 1916)

 

GREGORY, Sergeant, F, Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 14 October 1916)

 

GREY, CHARLES. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

GREY, Sergeant, GEORGE, Inniskilling Fusiliers. Native of Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GREY, Sergeant, JOHN, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. Son of Patrick Grey, Singleton’s Cottages, Mell, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

GREY, ROBERT. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

GROOMBRIDGE, Private, W, Royal Irish Rifles. From Quay Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GRIFFITHS, Lieutenant Chaplain, F, Royal Engineers. From Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GRIMES, Private, J, 7481, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Prisoner of war.

See BENNETT, Private, P

 

GRIMES, Private, P, 1 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Hill Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916) Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 15 July 1916)

 

GROGAN, JOHN, 2369,  19/12th Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. Born Ardee Co Louth. Age 42, occupation Cook. Enlisted 12 March 1917. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin noted as cousin, also noted with the word  ‘Legallee’ or ‘Legattee’,  Mary Maginn, Greenmount, Castlebellingham, Co Louth. Noted ‘Advise Mrs M Shea  of any further reports concerning this soldier. Mrs M Shea , Queens College, Summer Hill, Sydney.’ Previous military experience two six month periods in  (data indecipherable) (CMR and NMR?) time expired, South Africa.  In Egypt 25 March 1917, to isolation camp on same day.. To hospital sick in September and November 1918. Evacuated Damascus September 1918 wih influenza. To Australia with TB, 12 April 1919. Arrived Australia 18 May 1919. Discharged  17 May 1921. An enquiry as to his whereabouts, dated 8 April, 1919 from Mrs Mary Shea, Queen’s College, Summer Hill, Sydney, who claimed to be his cousin, is on file. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

GUEST, Private, P, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Wynne’s Terrace, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

GUINNESS, Colonel, C D, Royal Field Artillery. From Clermont Park, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

 GUINNESS, Lieutenant, O C, Worcester Regiment. From Clermont Park, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Amongst the latest return of wounded officers is the name of Lieutenant Guinness, Worcestershire Regiment, who is a son of Colonel Guinness of Clermont Park (Dundalk Democrat, 26 September 1914)

 

GYLES, Private, CHARLES, 16 Divisional Cycling Company, Royal Field Artillery. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

The last (National Army) fatality in Louth in 1922 was twenty-four year old Volunteer Charles Gyles … . A native of Dundalk from Bachelor’s Walk, he was shot and wounded in Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk on the Thursday 30 November just yards from his home. Gyles, wearing a civilian coat and army trousers, was approached by two men, two shots rang out which found their target, and Gyles collapsed and shouted “Oh my God, I am shot”. The two men, both of whom were carrying handguns, ran down Bachelor’s Walk, pursued by an army sergeant who fired two shots at them, but they escaped … the initial report in the Dundalk Democrat recorded that “it was generally stated in Dundalk yesterday that poor Gyles, because of his activities in connection with the army here, had been ‘marked’”.    Evidence given by one witness stated that no conversation took place between the parties. 

(At the) the inquest into the killing of Gyles was held on 2 December 1922 …  counsel for the army stated:

At another inquest a short time ago I said it was a sad duty to have to ask an Irish jury to return a verdict of murder against the two men whose names have been mentioned. Your duty is to find that they are guilty of the murder of this soldier of Ireland, Charles Gyles … and I can only trust that very shortly retribution will fall on the people who are responsible for shooting this unfortunate man.   

 

The verdict of the jury was that the fatal shots ‘were deliberately fired  by two men … who are guilty of wilful murder’. 

 

Charles Gyles was formerly a British soldier who had served in France during the Great War, and his military funeral to St Patrick’s cemetery Dundalk, was attended by members of the National Army, by members of the British Legion, and formers comrades with whom he had served in the Great War. (extract from unpublished PhD thesis, Violence and political factionalism and their affects on

North Louth 1874-1943, Donal Hall (Maynooth, 2009))

 

GYLES, Private, ROBERT, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. Prisoner of War. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Mrs Gyles of this town has had a letter from her son, Driver Robert Gyles, who is a prisoner of war in Germany. He states that he and his comrades have been under punishment ever since they were removed to the camp at Limburg, receive no letters, have their parcels from home opened and stolen and get the bread that is sent to the prisoners twice a week from Switzerland only when it is so old as to be unfit for use. Still, he says, ‘Don’t worry; God’s mill ground sure’.

(Dundalk Democrat, 14 July 1917)

 

GYLES, Driver, WILLIAM, 37 Division Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HAINES, Lieutenant, PATRICK A, Connaaught Rangers. Wounded.

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

HALE, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Chapel Lane, Dundalk.

It is unofficially reported that Private Patrick Hale, of the Irish Fusiliers, has been killed at Salonika. No official intimation has been received by his parents who reside in Chapel Lane, and it is hoped that the news may be untrue. Private Hale volunteered for service 15 months ago. His brother, James, who is also in the Fusiliers, is at present in hospital in Glasgow.

(Dundalk Democrat, 22 April, 1916)

 

HALL, Lieutenant,-,  Leinster Regiment. From Dundalk.

Some of our young Dundalk men who joined the army in the past year are just gone to the front. They include Lieuts. Roe, Brown, Flynn and Hall who are all serving in the same Irish Battalion. Surgeon Lavery has also gone to France to join the medical corps there. (Dundalk Democrat, 5 August 1916)

 

HALPENNY, JOSEPH, Motor Transport. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HALPIN, Private, ARTHUR, 10 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

Drogheda Volunteer at the Front. Private Arthur Halpin, Stockwell Street, who joined the 10th Royal Dublin Fusiliers has gone to France after ten weeks training. He had been in the local Volunteers. (Drogheda Advertiser, 26 August 1916)

 

HALPIN, Petty Officer, M, Royal Navy, HMS Berwick. From Cherrymount, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HALPIN, MICHAEL, 1 Battalion, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HALPIN, THOMAS, Royal Irish Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HALPING, Private, WILLIAM, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Bachelor’s Walk, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

HAMILL, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Twenties, Drogheda. Member of Drogheda Volunteers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HAMILTON, SHAW, from Ard Ronan

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

HAND, JAMES. Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. ‘At present in training’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

James Hand, 6329, Private, 1 Battalion Irish Guards, son of James Hand Co Louth and Mary Hand (nee Carroll) of Dunleer, Co. Louth. Enlisted in Irish Guards, Dundalk,  31 December, 1914. Posted to France 1 June, 1915. Seriously wounded 19 December, 1915. Discharged from the Army 5 February, 1917. James died 10 September 1920 aged 24 years. He is buried in Cheadle, Cheshire, United Kingdom. (source: Grand-daughter of Private James Hand).

 

HANLON, Private, ARTHUR, 7 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HANLON, Private, JOHN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Lisdoo, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HANNON, Chief Stoker, J, Royal Navy, HMS Temporaire. Native of Queensboro’ Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HANRATTY, DANIEL, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HANRATTY, Private, J, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Drogheda Independent, 11 November 1916)

 

HANRATTY, LAWRENCE, 4568, Australian Imperial Force, Born Drogheda. Age 30, occupation Seaman. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Mr Bernard Hanratty, 27 Scarlett Street, Drogheda, Co Louth, address changed to 20 Cooper Street, off Cross Lane, Salford, Lancashire, England, father. Enlisted 13 December 1915.  Arrived in England 7 June 1916. June 9 , 1916, charged with using obscene language to an NCO and refusing to obey the order of an NCO.  Awarded 7 days Field Punishment No 2, and forfeit 7 days pay. July 15, 1916 (1) Drunk in camp (2) Absent without leave from Parade. Forfeit one days pay and admonished. Court-martial October 24, 1916, (1) deserting from 11 October 1916 to 12 October.1916 (2) Drunkenness.  Found not guilty of desertion, guilty of being absent without leave. Awarded 56 days detention and fined £1.  To France 14 December 1916. Back in hospital England 6 February 1917, paralysis left side.  Absent without leave 22 May 1917 to 23 May 1917. Awarded 2 days confined to barracks. Left England for  Australia 28 August 1917.  Landed Australia 24 October 1917. Discharged from Australian Imperial Forces, 22 November 1917, as medically unfit. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

HANRATTY, Patrick Alphonsus (b.1895; d.1958),  From Collon.

3rd Royal Irish Regiment (29.10.1915 – 8.7.1916)
10th Royal Irish Rifles (16.7.1916 – 16.1.1918)
Machine Gun Corps (20.1.1918- 1.5.1918)
(Handwritten reference from O/C 29th Batt MGC dated 14.2.1920 in his “Officer’s Record of Service”). Studied medicine with distinction in the 1920s in UCD, achieving first class honours and first in class each year. Awarded the O’Ferrall Gold Medal in Surgery in 1925. At Messines (serving with 10th Royal Irish Rifles) he was a 21 year old 2nd Lieutenant leading a platoon (and wrote a wonderful letter home to his mother describing the lead up to the battle through to the aftermath).

The supplement to the London Gazette of 27th November 1917 indicates that shortly afterwards, he was promoted to Lieutenant on 1st July 1917; the issue of 22nd March 1919 indicates he was appointed Acting Captain. He remained in Germany into 1920. His final years were spent as the Dispensary Doctor based in Dunleer until his death in December 1958.

            (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

           

 

HARDY , Lieutenant, -,  From Dundalk.

Mr Joseph Loudon has received a letter from his son, Adj-Maj J S Loudon, South African Horse, who has passed through the East African campaign (now nearing its close) without receiving a scratch, and as he had lived for years in its climate, he escaped the fevers that laid  so many of the white men low in that vast country of unending forest, slow moving rivers and swamps. Another Dundalk man who has been through the campaign, a son of  Mr O Hardy, CPS, has had a bad dose of malaria, but we are glad to hear he is improving.

            (Dundalk Democrat, 28 April 1917)

           

Another Tank man, Lieut Hardy, son of Mr Oswald Hardy, C P S, has been wounded in the recent fighting in which he had some remarkable experiences. We are glad to hear that he is getting on satisfactorily and expects soon to be at it again. (Dundalk Democrat, 24 August 1918)

 

HARDIE, Driver, RONALD, Signal Corps, Royal Engineers. From Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HARDY, Gunner, HAROLD D, Motor Machine Gun (Company). From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Second Lieutenant Harold Hardy of the Tank Corps (son of Mr Oswald Hardy, C P S, Dundalk, has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery this set out in the official publication: - “On August ??1918, his tank was held up by an explosion of a dump of enemy gas shells causing himself and his crew to be gassed. ON recovering he rallied his men, three of whom had meantime been wounded, got his tank started again and carried on with the fight. He went ahead of the objective in order to crush several enemy machine gun positions which were causing great trouble to the infantry, thus allowing the latter to consolidate their position in safety. It was owing to his grit and determination the objectives were gained and undoubtedly the lives of many infantry saved.” This is a fine achievement and Lieut. Hardy’s many friends in Dundalk will be proud that it has been signally recognised. (Dundalk Democrat, 1 March 1919)

 

HARDY, JOHN M, Army Service Corps. From Faughart, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HARDY, Gunner, PERCY, Motor Machine Gun (Company). From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HARDY, Gunner, SIDNEY A, 27 Battalion Royal Field Artillery. From Seatown Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HARDY, STEPHEN  (c1889 – 1960)

Born in Dysert, Togher parish in c1889 (aged 12 in the 1901 Census). Per local knowledge (Cluskey family & Mary McDonnell, Darver) fought in France and possibly Middle East in the First World War. He was also captured and became a POW.

He worked as a labourer for the Cluskey family in Darver. He died in 1960 and was buried in Mayne graveyard, Clogherhead. There is a headstone but his name is not recorded. No obituary found but the first anniversary of his death is noted in the Dundalk Democrat of 16th December 1961:

1st Anniversary of Stephen Hardy, late of Togher, who died 17th December 1960 at Manfieldstown. Remembered by the Cluskey family.   (Source Declan  Qualie).

1901 Census: Stephen Hardy, aged 12,  lived at house 14, Togher, Dysart, Co Louth, Occupation Farm Servant.  Father, John Hardy, age 50, farmer. Mother, Mary Hardy, age 40. Four siblings.

1911 Census: Mary, age 65 (note discrepancy in age with 1901 census) now a widow and head of  household. Two children and one grandson present. No sign of Stephen Hardy in the 1911 Census of Ireland.

 

HARMON, Private, C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 20 May, 1916)

 

HARMON, LEO, South Irish Horse

HARMON, THOMAS, Royal Garrison Artillery

HARMON, VINCENT, Royal Air Force.

Three brothers who along with a forth, Philip, Lance-Corporal, Royal Irish Regiment who died from wounds,1 April 1918, from Salterstown, Co Louth. (Source, Joe Harmon, son of Thomas).

1901 Census: House 18 Salterstown, Co Louth. Joseph Harmon, age 41, Head of Family, Roman Catholic, born Co Louth, occupation Farmer; wife Mary Harmon, age 28, Roman Catholic, born Australia; son Philip, age 6, born Australia; son Thomas, age 3 born Co Louth; daughter Mary, age 2 born Co Louth; son Leo no age shown, born Co Louth; uncle Joseph, age 73, occupation Retired Draper

1911 Census: House 36 Salterstown, Co Louth. Joseph Harmon, age 53, Head of Family, Roman Catholic, occupation Farmer, born Co Louth. Mary Harmon, wife, age 42, Roman Catholic, born Australia; son Philip, age 16 born Australia; son Thomas, age 13 born Co Louth; daughter Mary, age 11 born Co Louth; son Leo age 10 born Co Louth; son Vincent age 8 born Co Louth; son Patrick, age 6, born Co Louth; daughter Ellen age 3 born Co Louth.

 

HARRINGTON, DAVID, lived at 75 George’s Street, Drogheda, in accommodation owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

HARRIS, GEORGE ARTHUR, 35306, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Born 6 September 1883, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Church of England. Occupation Wheelwright. Previous military experience, nine years in the Imperial Yeomanry. Next-of-kin,  entry as follows deleted,  F P Harris, 96 Darby Road, Loughborough Rd, Leicestershire (?), England, father,  and replaced with Mrs Harris, 474 Lasille Road, VERDUN? Attested on  22 September 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, Canada. 

 

HARTIGAN, Private, -,  Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Enlisted in Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HARTNETT, LESLIE. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

HARTSHORNE, F, Royal Field Artillery. From Barrack Street, Dundalk.(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HARVEY, J, Royal Field Artillery. From Demesne Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HASLIN, Private, JOHN ELLIGAN, 2161, 36 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Drogheda, Co Louth. Roman Catholic. Occupation painter.  Next-of-kin, Mrs Alice Russell, 9 Trouton Street, Balmain, Sydney, Australia, sister.  Served two years and three months in Tonicroft (Thornycroft?) Mounted Infantry,  South Africa (Boer War).  Enlisted  26 April 1916, age 33 and six months. Arrived in England 11 October 1916. Went Absent Without Leave 9 December 1916 and declared an illegal absentee. Apprehended in London 15 April 1917, sentenced to 120 days detention. Released 8 August 1917, posted to France 9 September 1917. Wounded in action, gunshot wound in the left  leg,  12 October 1917. Transferred to England 29 October 1917. Discharged from hospital 25 January 1918. Embarked for Australia 8 April 1918. Disembarked Australia 28 May 1918. To hospital . Went absent without leave 20 October 1918. Discharged in consequence of being illegally absent 21 July 1920.

 

HATCH, Lieutenant, MARK PENDRY, A V C I C, on active service. Son of Mr Mark Hatch, Duleek. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HATCH, Lance-Corporal, N S, 13 (Service) Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, (Down Volunteers, Ulster Volunteer Force), son of Mr Mark Hatch, Duleek.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HAZLETON, G, Royal Naval Air Service. From 38 Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HEALY, Sergeant-Major, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment. (retired).

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HEALY, BERNARD, Royal Engineers. From Pitcher Hill, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HEALY, EDWARD, Royal Navy, HMS Service. From Pitcher Hill, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HEALY, EUGENE P, 4 Hussars. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HEALY, JOHN, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment. From Pitcher Hill, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HEANEY, Private, OWEN, Royal Irish Rifles. From Chapel Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HEARTY, PATRICK. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HEARTY, WILLIAM. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HEASLEY, Henry J, On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

HEENAN, NICHOLAS, 1037198, 238 Battalion, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,   411,  7th Avenue, New Westminster, British Columbia. Born  21 November 1877, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Steam Engineer. Next-of-kin  Sarah Jane Keenan,   411,  7th Avenue, New Westminster, British Columbia, wife.  Currently serving in militia. Attested on 28 July 1916 at Vancouver, Canada.

 

HEENEY, JOHN, Lancashire Fusiliers. From Bolton Square, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HEFFERNAN, CHRISTOPHER, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HENNESSEY, JOHN, 12th Army Service Corps, Australian Imperial Force. Born St James,  Drogheda Co Meath. Age 35 years and 5 months. Roman Catholic. Occupation , Labourer. Next-of-kin. Mrs Lily Hennessey, 41 Barray Street, Carlton, wife. Previous military service in Canadian Army Service Corps. Enisted 8 December 1914. Discharged 28 December 1914, unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

 

HENNESSY, Sergeant-Major, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HENRY, JOHN. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(There is a John Henry, Castlebellingham, listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HENRY, R, from Rathnestin.

A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

 

HENRY, Lieut. WALTER, Richardstown Castle. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham )

 

HENRY, WILLIAM. In the army. From Blackrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(There is a William Henry, Castlebellingham, listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HERNON, Private, JOHN, 2 Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Anne Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

HERNON, Private, J, Signallers, Machine Gun Corps. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

 

HEWSON, Captain, ARTHUR, Royal Navy. From Claretrock, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HICKEY, JAMES,  Royal Naval Reserve. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HICKEY, Private, T, Royal Irish Rifles. Native of, and enlisted in, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HICKS, THOMAS EDMUND, 2043579, Canadian Field Artillery, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  273 Austin Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Born 29 November 1886, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Clerk. Next-of-kin Mrs Grace Hicks,  273 Austin Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, wife. Attested  on 15 May 1917, at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

 

HIGGINS, First Mate, John, S S Dundalk. From Broughton Street,  Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918.

            The Mate’s story.

Seventeen hours in an open boat.

John Higgins, of Broughton Street, was acting as mate of the Dundalk, owing to the illness of his brother. He was one of the five landed on Wednesday afternoon, and in an interview with A “Democrat” reporter he gave details of the awful occurrence. Everything went well from 6 p.m. until 11, at which hour he was going to his room, having been relieved by the captain on the bridge. Just then the “Dundalk” was hit by a torpedo, fair in the engine-room on the port side, and sank immediately. He and another of the crew – a man named Byrne – got into one of the lifeboats, which was soon on a level with the water. The lifeboat was got clear of the steamer and, hearing cries for help, they picked up the others who landed with them. In the explosion, which was terrific, the main derrick was thrown down and crashed on the lifeboat, damaging her badly. The plight of the seven men in a small boat can be imagined. For seventeen hours they kept afloat, rowing all the time and baling their little boat, which was so badly damaged that she made little water. They had no food, only a little fresh water and, as the mate expressed it, not as much tobacco as would fill a pipe. The constant rowing and baling throughout those 17 hours on a cold October day told on the occupants of the boat. Before they were rescued they suffered greatly from pains and the intense cold, and two of their number are still in a hospital in Holyhead.

Asked if he had seen the submarine, Mt Higgins replied, “Not until she struck us. When we were in the small boat drifting around, the submarine remained on the top for about 5 minutes and then skirted off.” By this time the “Dundalk” had gone down.

While in the water he saw another of the “Dundalk’s” boats come off. He believes there were six or seven in it, but in the darkness they drifted apart and he never saw it after.

Asked if they had been passed by any boat, Mr Higgins replied that a collier had passed them going so close they were nearly put down. The men in the lifeboat called for help “and, said Mr Higgins, “I called the captain of the boat by name.” After going a distance the collier eased a bit but did not come near them.

Throughout their long vigil in the open boat the men had up a flag of distress – an old blanket flying from a n oar. They saw one boat pass them, but it was too far off to observe the men in difficulty.

At half past four on Tuesday afternoon a seaplane was plying over them, and on seeing the signal at once turned and scouted for assistance. This soon arrived in the shape of the trawler “Stormcock” and the men were taken and landed at Holyhead.

“While we were in the trawler, “ said the survivor, “we were treated as well as men could be treated. We got plenty of food, cigarettes and everything – in fact we wanted for nothing. The Admiralty Captain, Captain Norton, is a gentleman and looked after everyone of us in the best way. Lieut Green at Holyhead was also anxious for us and got us permission for us to get aboard the mail boat and sleep the night there. In Dublin this morning Mr Ede of the North Wall, and the manager of the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society saw that we got everything we wanted.

In the small boat the men kept the oars going all the time, and it was necessary if they were  to keep afloat until help arrived that baling should be constantly done. The night was “not too bad – if nothing worse came on.”

Mr Higgins who is a well known local seaman and ordinarily a member of the crew of the Bessbrook, felt of course the severe effects of the exposure, but otherwise is all right. He has a wife and several young children, and has been heartily congratulated on his escape. (Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

           

HILL, Lieutenant, ARTHUR R, Royal Navy. From Sunnyside, Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HILL, Mary K, Voluntary Aid Detachment, (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

HILLIER, W (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

HINDS, Major, A, staff officer in the Horse Guards. (HINDE, Major H, in McDonnell)

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

HIPWELL, Reverend, RS, BS St Peter’s Drogheda. Volunteered as chaplain to the forces at the front. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

HODGINS, Private, J, Royal Irish Rifles. Native of, and enlisted in Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HODGENS, Private, T, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

HODGERS, JOHN, Castlebellingham, (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HOEY, Private, H, Royal Irish Rifles. From Dundalk. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 20 May, 1916)

 

HOEY, Lance-Corporal, H, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 16 December 1916)

 

HOEY, Lance-Corporal, J, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Castlebellingham.

Lce-Corpl. J Hoey, 8th Royal Dublin Fusiliers (Irish Brigade) has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous bravery in action against the Germans on April 27th. He is a native of Castlebellingham. Colonel Edward Bellingham is in command of the regiment, in which numerous Co. Louth men are serving. At the front they have named themselves “Bellingham’s Own”.

(Dundalk Democrat,13 August 1916)

(Possibly James or John Hoey, Castlebellingham,  both of whom are listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham. To date I have been unable to trace any record of a Lce Cpl Hoey , RDF who was awarded the D.C.M.)

 

HOEY, JAMES, ‘in training with the Royal Irish Fusiliers’. From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Independent, 15 January 1916)

(Possibly J Hoey, Stabannon, listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HOEY, JOSEPH, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. (Working in) M’Gorisk & Co, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

HOEY, WILLIAM. 8 Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HOEY, WILLIAM, Royal Army Service Corps. From Peter Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HOGAN, Sergeant, -, 5  Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HOGAN, Private, THOMAS, Leinster Regiment. From 6 Mary Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

            The 16th Irish

A line from the Dundalk Boys

 

Dear Editor – Just a line from two Dundalk boys who are serving their King and country and will be in France in the course of a few days. We are sending you Cardinal Bourne’s address to the Irish Brigade. He is a real nice old man. There are a good lot of boys from about the old town soldiering here. All are happy and in the very best health and anxious to strike a good blow for the dear homeland. Hoping you will publish this letter and the Cardinal’s address in your paper, which we are glad to get from home every week, particularly to see the Gaelic Notes.

Private T. Brennan, 1987, Blackrock

Private T Hogan, Mary Street, Dundalk.

‘Go on the Geraldines’

(Also attached was a long address from Cardinal Bourne, reported as follows ‘On Sunday, November 14th, 1915, his Eminence Cardinal Bourne visited the 16th (Irish Division at Farnborough, on the invitation of General Sit Laurence Parsons, K.C.B. In his address, his Eminence said’ (in part)

You have given yourself as free men in the full use of your freedom to the service of your country. There has been no compulsion of the law, but it is your own sense of duty, your own conscience, and that alone, which has enabled you to take up arms in defence of your Country, of your Empire, and of your King.  … There was a moment, you will remember, when our enemies thoroughly counted upon our own political dissensions, believing that thereby we in the United Kingdom should be rendered impotent in face of the foe, and there were some, no doubt, at home who shared the apprehensions that gave rise to those hopes in the breast of our enemies. But the historical declaration of the Leader of the Irish Nationalist Party, Mr John Redmond at the outset of the war, a declaration which, I think, will live in the proud and grateful memory of the Irish race throughout the world, swept away at once the hopes of our enemies and the apprehensions of our friends. … Be prepared, therefore, if God asks you to make the supreme sacrifice of your lives; be prepared to pass into his divine presence; have your hearts and souls ready cleansed from sin, and ready to go into the presence of God himself. As you know, you have every opportunity of practicing your Faith and of approaching the Holy Sacraments. You have your chaplains ready at your disposal. If more chaplains are needed, I know that there will be no difficulty on the part of the authorities. So I say to you again, be prepared, ready, to go forth to do your duty as good children of Ireland and good sons of the Catholic Church. May God be with you. May he watch over you. May He guard you and enable you in every place and what ever your duties may be, to do your duty to your country and to your Empire, and to your King.

(Dundalk Democrat,18 December 1915)

 

Mrs Hogan, Mary Street, Dundalk, has received intimation from the War Office that her son, Private T Hogan, of the 7th Battalion Leinster Regiment, has been admitted to the general hospital in France suffering from a grenade wound in the chest. (Dundalk Democrat, 8 July 1916)

 

Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 15 July 1916)

 

HOLDCROFT, BERNARD, Royal Navy. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

HOLMES, Captain, J M, 19 Lancers. From Dillon, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

A sporting correspondent writes –“Another Louth man has joined the colours. One of the best sportsmen and hardest cross-country riders in Louth (Mr George Holmes of Dillon House) has got a commission in a cavalry regiment.

(Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915)

 

HOLT, J snr. From Peter Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HOLT, J jnr. From Peter Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HORAN, Private, FRANCIS, 1 Battalion, Irish Guards. From Dundalk.

In the list of wounded published during the week appears the name of Private Frank Horan, of the Irish Guards. Private Horan, who was employed in Dundalk, volunteered for service in the Irish Guards and has been serving with the 1st Battalion of that regiment in France for some time past.

(Dundalk Democrat, 23 October 1915)

 

HOSIE, JAMES, from Castlebellingham district.

(Report of meeting in Annagassan chaired by Brigadier General Edward Bellingham) He suggested that the ex-servicemen form a club to look after their interests under the new Act, or in the alternative form a branch of the Comrades of the Great War or the Discharged or Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation.

Immediately afterwards a branch of the D S and S A was formed of which the following officials were appointed – President, Jas Hosie; Treasurer, Robt. Donnan, Secretary, Owen Campbell. About 50 members were enrolled.

(Dundalk Democrat, 17 January 1920)

 

HOWTING, Corporal, ARTHUR  J, 89384, of Grandview Brantford, Canada, late of North Road, Drogheda. Enlisted as army mechanic in Toronto in 4 Brigade Royal Engineers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (Canadian Archives RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 4564 – 13)

Mr H Megan, well known in football circles in Drogheda a few years ago, and who was employed in the “Advertiser” Office before he went to Canada, has sent the following cutting from the Toronto “Evening Telegram”. Mr Megan, it may be stated, volunteered at the outbreak of the war, but would not be accepted owing to an injury to his toes received while playing football in Canada a few years back.

Corporal Howting was well known in Drogheda, being a nephew of Mr A T Mitchell, Stamullen, and brother-in-law of Mr W Elliot, Drogheda. A photo of Corporal Howting appears in the same issue of “The Telegram”, with his little son, Willie, who gathered more money on Red Cross Day at Brantford than anyone else there:-

 

JEERED CRIPPLES SOLDIER

SLACKERS GET IT WRONG

USING HIS CRUTCH CORPORAL HOWTING SET SNEERING YOUTHS TO FLIGHT ON YONGE STREET SATURDAY NIGT.

 

Corporal A J Howting, a crippled soldier who is undergoing treatment at the Convalescent Hospital in College Street, was walking slowly up Yonge street on Saturday night about 9 o’clock, and when about 100 yards below College Street he met a party of ladies, who, as they passed, expressed sympathy with the poor soldier who was so laboriously making his way along with the aid of a pair of crutches. Just as the ladies passed by, the Corporal was arrested by a remark about “these fellows getting sympathy which is not deserved.”

 

His Irish was up

 

Corporal Howting was born in Drogheda, Ireland, and of course an Irishman could not let a thing like that pass unnoticed. He espied three young fellows in civilian clothes standing at the lighted window of a store, and as there was no one else around he concluded that the remark came from that quarter. He caught the young men laughing, and hobbling over to them, he asked what they were laughing at. “Did you mean what you said there?”, he asked; “are you laughing at me?”

There was no answer, but one fellow a little taller and a little older than the others sneered. That was enough for the corporal. His blood was up.

 

Slackers beat it.

 

Come on, you slackers; come on you pasty-faced, chicken-hearted cowards. There’s not a man among you. I’ll take the three of you, “ and grasping one of his crutches, he made for the youths.

One of them made to stand his ground, but that avenging crutch seemed too much for him, and the three “heroes” beat it up Yonge street and along Carlton Street.

“If I could have got them,” said the corporal, “I’d have swept the street with them. Fancy three slackers like that sneering at one who is doing his bit. I don’t like these crutches any better than anybody else, but I’ve got to use them.”

 

Could not sleep.

 

Two ladies who had seen what had happened made for a policemen across the street, and asked him to protect the soldier. They might have saved themselves the trouble, for the answer they got was: “Oh, he’s all rights The men in that uniform can look after themselves pretty well.” When seen at the hospital yesterday, the corporal said that he could not sleep all night thinking about what he had missed. What I would have given to have got at them. That’s what worries me. I just would have liked to have smashed them …GET REST

(Drogheda Advertiser, 25 March 1916)

 

HOWTING, JOHN, of Grandview Brantford, Canada, late of North Road, Drogheda. Enlisted as army mechanic in Toronto in 4 Brigade Royal Engineers. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HOWTING, ROBERT, of Grandview Brantford, Canada, late of North Road, Drogheda. Enlisted as army mechanic in Toronto in 4 Brigade Royal Engineers. Served for three years in Dufferin Rifles.  (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HUBER, Private, JOHN G, Black Watch. Son of Mr Huber, Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

HUDSON, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda.

A Royal Irish Fusilier, in a letter to his friend in Drogheda writes : - “There is a Drogheda chap here of the name of Hudson who had a very narrow escape a few days after we went into the trenches. A bullet struck his equipment strap just over his heart, entered his pocket and out through a lot of letters, it then went down to his bottom pocket, cut through a leather purse and came out through the bottom right hand side of his coat. He showed it to me next morning, only I saw it I would never have believed that a bullet could be turned in such a way. These days all the lads are asking what had he in his pockets that the bullet wanted so badly. (Drogheda Independent, 3 July 1915)

 

HUGHES, Sergeant, ARTHUR, 9199 Inniskilling Fusiliers and 9148 Connaught Rangers. From Ravensdale, Dundalk. Enlisted Connaught Rangers 10 August 1907, to Inniskilling Fusiliers October 1907. Served in China and India before the war. In France from 1915. Wounded March 1918 and discharged December 1918. Full service file available on ancestry.co.uk

Awarded 1915 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. (UK National Archives WO 372/10/87934)

Census 1901: Arthur Hughes age 11, lived at house 4, Ballymascanlan, Dundalk. Occupation Scholar. Father, John Hughes, age 65, born Co Down, occupation Gardiner. Mother, Mary Anne Hughes. Two siblings Bella, aged 20, occupation Domestic Servant, and James, aged 15. 

 

HUGHES, Private, EDWARD, Royal Army Medical Corps. From 33 Parnell Street (sic), Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

In the list of recipients of certificates of honour published in last week’s “Democrat” the name of Mr Wm Hughes, 33 Parnell Park was omitted. Mr Hughes has a son who has been in the firing line in France since last July. (Dundalk Democrat, 25 December 1915)

 

HUGHES, JAMES, Royal Munster Fusiliers. From Dunleer district.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

HUGHES, JAMES, Royal Garrison Artillery. From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

 

HUGHES, Rifleman, JOHN, 3 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From 2 St.Brigit’s Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HUGHES, JOSEPH, Royal Garrison Artillery, From Scarlet Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

34988, Gunner. Enlisted 1911. Served in France 1914-1916, Salonika `1917 -1918. Discharged  1919. Home address 101 Scarlet Street, Drogheda. Full service record available on Ancestry co uk. 

 

HUGHES, JOSEPH,

On 30 October 1924, the remains of six men executed by National Army firing squad during the Civil War, were re-interred in St. Patricks Cemetery, Dundalk.

It was estimated that there were a thousand people inside the cemetery grounds when, at the end of the ceremony, a number of men in civilian clothing, took out revolvers and fired three volleys over the graves.  National Army officers in civilian clothing drew weapons and rushed the grave. Uniformed soldiers at the perimeter, opened fire over the heads of the people gathered, while other soldiers rushed into the graveyard. Shooting continued for five minutes and panic ensued. Some people made for the exits, but most, including priests and members of the Gardai lay on the ground or hid behind tombstones in the torrents of rain. When the firing died down the people rushed for the exits or jumped boundary fences and walls to escape. A cordon of bayonet-wielding troops cleared one section of the graveyard.  Twenty men were arrested, although only two, Ivor Monaghan and Tom Rogers remained in custody that night. One man was fatally wounded, Joseph Hughes, a native of Dundalk who was living in Scotland and was home on holiday. Hughes was a post office official who had served and been wounded while serving in a Scottish regiment during the Great War. He was seen  running towards the Protestant part of the graveyard when he was wounded in the abdomen. Hughes was removed to hospital where he was operated on but died shortly afterwards.

An inquest was held over two days on Saturday 1 November and 12 November. The evidence given by National Army, Garda and civilian witnesses would lend veracity to an opinion that the army’s actions bordered on the reckless. Dr Clarke who had operated on Hughes, stated that Hughes informed him that he had been standing close to the graves and the army was behind him.  After a volley of shots was fired at the graveside he heard someone say ‘Come on boys, we’ll get them now’ as the soldiers passed through. Hughes turned to run away and as he did so he was wounded. Hughes also said that as he fell he saw a military man beside him…

…The jury brought in a verdict that deceased died from shock and haemorrhage following a bullet wound, but there was no evidence to show by whom the wound was inflicted. The following rider was added to the verdict ‘The jury are of opinion that the situation was handled injudiciously by the military authorities.’

(extract from unpublished PhD thesis, Violence and political factionalism and their affects on North Louth 1874-1943, Donal Hall (Maynooth, 2009))

 

(Extract from newspaper report of  inquest) Peter M’Cluskey said he was a cousin of the deceased whose remains he identified. The deceased was a postal telephonist  in Glasgow. He was single and aged 26 years. Deceased had come to Dundalk on the 17th October on a holiday and on that date witness saw him , Deceased was in god health. With the exception of wounds – a fracture of the left leg – which the deceased had received in France, deceased had always enjoyed good health.

Mr O’Hagan – Do you know what his wages were in the Post Office? About £3 a week

Was he also in receipt of an army pension? Yes of 14/- a week.

Do you know if he was the sole supporter of his widowed sister Mrs MacGonigal and her three children? Yes she was.

To Mr Hamill – The deceased had no other brothers or sisters living.

(Dundalk Democrat 8 November 1924)

 

Funeral of Joseph Hughes

The people of Dundalk turned out in thousands on Sunday night and accompanied the remains of Joseph Hughes, the victim of the cemetery shooting from the Louth Infirmary, where he died, to St Patrick’s Cathedral, where the bier was left on the catafalque before the High Altar overnight. So dense was the throng that many could not gain an entrance to the church while the prayers for the dead were being recited.

On Monday afternoon the funeral took place from St Patrick’s Cathedral to Castletown Cemetery and was of exceedingly large dimensions. Though it was market day in Dundalk, all business was temporarily suspended while the mournful procession wended its way through the streets of the town

Six of  deceased’s school companions acted as pall-bearers. The Rev C Hurson Adm., assisted by Rev WQ Butterly C.C. officiated at the graveside. (Dundalk Democrat, 8 November 1924)

 

HUGHES, O, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Camp Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HUGHES, Rifleman, OWEN, 8 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Nicholas Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HUGHES, THOMAS FRANCIS, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co. Louth. Age 37 years 4 months. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Bernard Hughes, 15 Kelso Terrace, Dundalk, father. Previous military service, sixteen months Kitchener Horse, South Africa. Enlisted 5 July, 1915, discharged 23 August 1915 “Disciplinary reasons”. 

 

HUGHES, Private, THOMAS, 51 Imperial Australian Forces. From Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

Wounded in the right shoulder and permanently disabled, Private Thomas Hughes, bomb thrower, 51st Battalion Australian Imperial Forces, arrived in Dundalk during the week. He is a native of Walterstown and well known in Dundalk. He arrived quite unexpectedly and unannounced. His people believed he had been killed in the Gallipoli Peninsula, where all his comrades save five went down.  These five were sent to France, and Private Hughes is now one of the surviving three. Enquiries from the War Office elicited no information for the last twelve months, so that the soldier’s return was a very welcome surprise to his mother and family and his many friends in Walterstown and Dundalk. He is a brother-in-law of Mr P M’Cusker, Earl Street.

Those who advocate Conscription in Ireland might read with interest the record of a football club from that same townland of Walterstown. In 1914 when the war broke out the team numbered 24. Of these nine were reservists. Nineteen joined the Colours. There are very few of them left. Those who were not killed were wounded, and that football team will hardly play a match again. Can any football team in England, prior to Conscription in that country, offer such a record? (Dundalk Democrat, 28 October 1916)

 

HUNT, J. From 14 Hill Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HURST, W WILLIAMS. Royal Army Service Corps. Clerk in the Post Office.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HUSSEY, PATRICK, 17 Field Company, Royal Engineers. From North Road, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HUTCHINGS, Chaplain, Reverend H T. From Heynestown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

HYNES, FRANCIS, ‘joined the navy and is supposed to be in the North Sea.’ From Dunleer district. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916). Brother of Frederick and Thomas Hynes. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HYNES, FRANK, 2 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HYNES, FREDERICK. Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. ‘In the trenches’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916). Brother of Francis and Thomas Hynes.

(Listed from Dromin, in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HYNES, JAMES, from Dromin. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

HYNES, THOMAS, Irish Guards. From Dunleer district. ‘At the front’, brother of Frederick Hynes and Francis Hynes. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

HYNES, P, 8 Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Lisnawilly, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

HYNES, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Platten Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

HYNES, Gunner, W, Royal Field Artillery. In France.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

INGLIS, CHARLES, Public Schools Battalion. Brother of J INGLIS (see next entry). Son of Mr J Inglis, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916). (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000). Second Lieutenant Douglas Ian Inglis, son of Mr J A Inglis, St. James’, Drogheda, was killed in action on 7 February, 1917.

 

INGLIS, J, Public Schools Battalion. Son of Mr J Inglis, Drogheda. See CHARLES INGLIS. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JACOBS, Sergeant Major,  52 Battalion, Royal Field Artillery. From Barrack Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

JACKSON, Bombardier, WILLIAM, Royal Field Artillery

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

JAMES, G, Royal Field Artillery. From Woodview Terrace, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

JAMES, CHARLES. Royal Irish Rifles. From King Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JAMESON, Second-Lieutenant, HENRY D, South Irish Horse, Carlow.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JAMESON, Midshipman, WILLIAM, HMS Canada,

(McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

JEANNETTE, JOSEPH HUGH, 3040158, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address 125 Halstead Street, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Born 8 March 1876, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Clerk. Previous military experience, seven months service as Private in the US Army.  Next-of-kin Stanley Jeannette, 613 East 5th  Street, El Paso, Texas, USA, son. Attested on 27 June 1918, at Toronto, Canada.

 

JOHNSTON, ARCHIBALD, 477469, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address: 22 Edward Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Born 3 October 1866, Dundalk, Co Louth.  Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Soldier. Next-of-kin  Mrs Agnes Johnston, 22 Edward Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, wife. Previous military experience twenty years Imperial Army, twelve years Royal Canadian Regiment. Currently serving in Royal Canadian Regiment. Attested on 16 August 1918, at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Noted that ‘Service reckons from 8th April 1906’.

 

JOHNSTON, FRANCIS, 14 Hussars. From Frances Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, Engineer, GRAHAM FRANKLIN, H M Hospital Ship Dongola, Royal Navy. From Ballsmill, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, Lance-Corporal, JAMES, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, Private, JAMES, Leinster Regiment. From Duleek Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, MAURICE FELIX, 2006574, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force. Address,  Van Horne Avenue, Toronto (?). Born 6 July 1898,Ravensdale,  Dundalk Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Clerical Work.  Next-of kin , Mary Johnston,  717 St. Antoine Street, Westmount. Previous military service in 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada.  Attested on 5 September 1917 at Montreal, Canada.

 

JOHNSTON, Private, P, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported missing. (Dundalk Democrat, 10 June 1916).

 

JOHNSTON, PATRICK. Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer district. ‘In training’. (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, THOMAS, 3 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Linenhall Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

We have had a letter from Mr Tom Johnston, who is at Salonika or somewhere thereabouts, and is well. He has met one Dundalk man named Quigley who is also “in the pink of condition” (Dundalk Democrat, 15 September 1916)

 

JOHNSTON, THOMAS, Royal Engineers. From Dundalk.

Mr Tom Johnston, Sanitary Inspector to the Urban Council, has enlisted for the term of the war in the Engineers, and will leave in a day or two. The Urban council has given him leave of absence, with part pay. Mr Johnston has already seen service during the Boer War, having been in South Africa for some time before the outbreak. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 April 1915)

 

JOHNSTON, Sergeant, THOMAS J, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dundalk. Wounded. (Tempest’s Annual 1918)

A certain melancholy interest attaches to a letter we had the other day from Mr Tom Johnston, who is convalescing in the Glasgow Red Cross Hospital. He writes “We have a Yorkshire man here, minus an eye, who was actually at poor John McShane’s side when he received his fatal wound. Corporal McShane, who was in charge of a digging party, seeing that his man was “done up,” took the tools himself to give the Yorkshireman a “spell.” Later on an officer came up and wished to speak to John. He handed the tools to Yorky and got into conversation with the officer. A German sniper, seeing them standing out over the men, and probably taking them both for officers, fired and the bullet hit poor John near the end of the spine. He died in 5 or 10 minutes - RIP. Mr Johnston has a “fragment” of shrapnel as a souvenir. It is a piece of tram rail 8 or 9 inches long. It is right to add that it was not this particular fragment that wounded him.

(Dundalk Democrat, 8 April 1916)

 

JONES, EDWARD, 7262, 36 Battalion, Australian Imperial Force. Born Dundalk, Co Louth, age 36 years. Occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic.  Next-of-kin, Mrs Maggie Jones, Dunany, Dunleer, Co Louth, mother. Enlisted 25 January 1917. Arrived in England 11 April 1917. To France 23 August 1917. Gunshot wound in left thigh,  Belgium, 12 October 1917. To England 24 November 1917. Returned to Australia 24 May 1918. Discharged 24 November 1918. Awarded  Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

JONES, Major, EUSTACE, Royal Field Artillery. From Lisnawilly, Dundalk. Prisoner of war. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

            A correspondent of the “Irish Times” says that in the list, already published of those who are either serving at the front, or in training from the County Louth, there were some notable omissions. Amongst others he mentions are: Sir A Vere Foster (Glyde Court), Major C M O’Reilly (Knock Abbey), Major Taaffe and Son (Smarmore Castle), Mr R Henry (Rathnestin), Mr Shaw Hamilton (Ard Ronan), Mr Macardle (Dundalk), Mr Backhouse (Dundalk), Mr Daly (Oriel Temple). In addition, Major Cliff and Colonel Guinness each have a son, and Colonel Jones two sons, serving. These are all commissioned officers. Some 500 men have enlisted since the war, in addition to a large number of reservists, who have rejoined and those who were already serving with the colours.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 November 1914)

 

JORDAN, J. From 38 Dublin Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

JORDAN, J, Public Schools Battalion. Son of Mr W J Jordan, A C A, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) Active service Flanders. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

JORDAN, V R, Royal Navy. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

  

KANE, ANTON, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KANE, Lance-Corporal, F, Leinster Regiment, From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Drogheda Independent, 28 October 1916)

 

KANE, Private, J, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KANE, JAMES,  Irish Guards, Royal Irish Fusiliers, and Royal Engineers. From Glyde Farm, Ardee. Full record available on Ancestry.co.uk

 

KANE, JAMES, 18 Battalion Royal Irish (Rifles/Regiment). From Bolton Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KARNEY, PATRICK, Royal Irish Rifles.  From Dunleer district. ‘At present in Wellington Barracks, Dublin.’ (Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

KIERAN, Lance-Corporal, P, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 12 August 1916)

 

KEATING, J. From Seatown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

(A Joseph Keating was active in British Legion in Dundalk and negotiated with Irish Sailors and Soldiers Trust on behalf of tenants of the Trusts houses in Dundalk.

 

KEATING, SAMUEL, Royal Army Medical Corps. From Queen’s Hotel, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KEAGAN, Private, THOMAS, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Drogheda

Pte Thomas Keagan of the Dublin Fusiliers and an old Company Commander in the Drogheda Volunteers, writes to Mr Peter Clinton from Limburg, Germany, where he is a prisoner of war, as follows – “Dear Mr Clinton – just a P O on behalf of six old Volunteers who are here prisoners of war. We are enjoying good health. The only thing we are short of is tobacco and cigarettes, and we would be very thankful to you and our comrades if you could see your way to send some out to us. Tell all our comrades we were asking for them. Faithfully yours,  Thom Keagan.

Those Drogheda man have been prisoner of war since the 27th of last August. Needless to say the local Volunteers are not by any means going to allow the appeal to pass unheeded, and any well wisher who would like to send a whiff to Limburg, will obtain full information from Mr Clinton or any member of the Corps. (Drogheda Independent, 15 May 1915)

 

KEARNS, Private, PATRICK, 1 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Has been home wounded and has now joined his regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KEARNS, Private, P, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Drogheda. Reported wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 September 1916)

 

KEARNS, Private, TERENCE, 2 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KEARNEY, JAMES, from Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

KEARNEY, JOSEPH, from  Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

KEARNEY, PATRICK. From Dundalk. See KIRK, Private, ES

 

KEARNEY, cattleman, PATRICK, crew member of S S Dundalk. From Dowdallshill, Dundalk. Survivor of the sinking of SS Dundalk  by U-Boat Attack, 14 October 1918.

Patrick Kearney, of Dowdallshill, a young unmarried man who is one of the survivors landed in Dundalk on Wednesday, gave a vivid account of his experiences when the Dundalk was sent to the bottom by the Germans. When seen by a “Democrat” reporter he was in bed suffering from an injury to his side and from the effects of the awful ordeal through which  he has passed.  Kearney had worked on the quay for the past number of years, but a week ago was sent as charge cattleman on the “Dundalk” the man who ordinarily did that work having been laid up with influenza. At 11 o’clock on Monday night he and four others were fast asleep in the deck cabin known as the smoking room when he was awakened by a tremendous noise. Clad only in his shirt and trousers Kearney rushed to the deck and found the vessel split in two and fast sinking by the head. While running to the deck he observed Captain O’Neill on the bridge, but he never saw him later.  He and his companions in the deck cabin – Frank Deery, James Tuite and Joe Fox, rushed to the lifeboats. Kearney made for the starboard after boat in which were the mate and a seaman (Byrne). In getting in he was jammed between the davit and the boat, and his side was injured. By the time he reached the boat that part of the deck was under water, which reached his chest. AS his lifeboat took the water they heard a shout  from two men who were clinging on to some floating wreckage. They rowed around and threw a line which one of them caught. They succeeded in getting the two men in. Both were gunners. One of them had been laid up with influenza and was very sick. He was clad only in a singlet and drawers, suffered horribly from the cold in the water, and was helpless when taken into the boat. The other gunner (Connor) had been on watch at the time and wore top boots and a heavy overcoat. It was with great difficulty they got him into the boat.

“The submarine then came alongside only about 30 yards off us,” said Kearney. “I could see a man standing near the conning tower. One of our crowd shouted to him, asking would he not try to save out lives. He paid no attention, and in a short time he went down.”

He saw the other lifeboat with Mulqueen and the others getting off, but he did not again see them.  When the Dundalk went down the place around was covered with wreckage. They rowed around trying to pick up the others, but they could hear or see nothing.

“Did any ship pass you while in the lifeboat, “ out representative asked.

“Yes” Kearney replied, “a coal boat passed us.” I did not know who it was . She was only about 15 yards off and could have thrown a heaving line to us; in fact she nearly ran us down. We were just picking up the two men that I told you about and we shouted “Steamer ahoy!” and also shouted if he was going away without us. The captain of the coal boat shouted something from the bridge, but we were lifting Connor up at the time and I didn’t hear what he said. The collier went on for about 150 yards and then eased down. We thought he was going to wait, but he didn’t come back at all.

The survivor then told of their 17 hours in the open boat, in which there was some water but no food. Four of them had to keep at the oars until daybreak. The boat was injured by the explosion of the torpedo and made water forward, and two men had to keep baling out. “All the time we were in the boat,” he said, “we were up to our knees in water. One of the gunners was very ill, and we wrapped the blankets we had in the boat about him.” When daylight came six of the men were rowing and baling, and it was decided to make for a point on the Welsh coast. The rudder had been knocked off the lifeboat. The unfortunate gunner who was ill helped to direct the course by compass. In this way they made slow progress from daybreak until 4 o’clock on Tuesday. They could see trawlers off the Cumberland coast, but their flag of distress – a blanket hoisted on an oar 0- failed to attract notice. Finally as the shades of another night were looming in the sky scouting aeroplanes came in sight and one of them came close and dropped a message. Very shortly afterwards a trawler came alongside and picked them up.

“How were you treated when you were taken off the boat!”

“We couldn’t have been better done for anywhere,” was the reply.

(Dundalk Democrat, 26 October 1918)

 

 

KEARNEY, PETER from, Castlebellingham. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

KEASKIN, JAMES, from Seabank. (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham).

 

KEEGAN, Private, THOMAS, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Hand Street, Drogheda. Served at the front with the Dublin Fusiliers and has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the outbreak. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLS, WILLIAM. On Roll of Honour, Church of Ireland, Collon.

 

KELLY, Private, C R, Royal Irish Rifles.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

KELLY, Captain, CHARLES, Royal Army Medical Corps. Also known as Carlisle Kelly. Born on 5th October 1891. He was son of John B Kelly, Medical Doctor and Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeon of Ireland, and Charlotte Kelly. The family lived at Lawrence Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

KELLY, Lance Corporal, DANIEL, 3 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KELLY, EDWARD, Australian Imperial Force, Born Drogheda, Co Louth. Age 26, occupation Labourer. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin, Mrs J Kelly, 34 North Strand, Drogheda, Ireland, mother. Enlisted 12 July 1915. To Egypt as stowaway October 1915. Returned to Australia April 1916. Letter  1 February 1949 to State Representative:  ‘after enlisting in the forces, (Mr Kelly)  stowed away on a troopship and proceeded to Egypt, he was temporarily attached to the 11th reinforcements 11th Battalion, but he was not allocated a regimental number. He was admitted to Special Mental hospital and returned to Australia as a “Bad Mental Case” admitted to hospital in Western Australia and later discharged as medically unfit.’

 

KELLY, Sergeant, FRANCIS, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

Possibly the same person later lived at 77 George’s Street, Drogheda, in house owned by the Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust.

 

KELLY, GRACE BELLEW, Voluntary Aid Detachment. Born 18 March 1878 to Dr John Bellew Kelly and Mrs Charlotte Kelly, Laurence St, Drogheda. Sister of Captain Carlisle Kelly RAMC. (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

KELLY, HUGH JAMES, 3 Battalion Connaught Rangers. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KELLY. JAMES, 164, 5 Mobile Veterinary Section, Australian Imperial Force. Enlisted 1 February 1915 at Alexandria, Egypt. Age 30 years, 11 months. Born Drogheda, Co Louth. Occupation Baker. Previously apprenticed to Galbraith, Drogheda. Roman Catholic. Next-of-kin Mrs B Kelly, No 1 Singleton Cottages, Mell, Drogheda, Co Louth, mother. Appointed Lance-Corporal.  July 13, 1915, charged with being drunk and absent without leave. Reduced to private and forfeit 7 days pay. January 21, 1916 fined 10/- for being drunk in Egypt. Serving in France by March 1917. On 21 March 1917 charged with neglect of duty being absent from his post while on piquet duty, awarded 7 days Field Punishment No 2. Returned to Australia November 1919. Discharged 20 November 1919. Awarded 1914/15 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

KELLY, Private, JOSEPH, 4 Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KELLY, Driver, MICHAEL, Royal Field Artillery. From Hill Street, Dundalk.

(Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KELLY, Sapper, P, Royal Engineers. From Dundalk. Reported wounded (Dundalk Democrat, 30 September 1916) Wounded September 1916. (Tempest’s Annual 1917).

 

KELLY, PATRICK, minesweeper HMS Polly, Royal Navy. From Lurgankeel, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

KELLY, Private, PETER, 8 Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers. From Yorke Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KELLY, PETER, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

KELLY, Private, PETER. 1 Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda

Another Drogheda Hero.       

The following letters received from Peter Kelly, and Private T Moore with the Expeditionary Force in France, have been handed in to us for publication.

France 22nd October, 1915

Dear Mother – I had a little adventure the other day, and went a little too near the Germans. I was never in so tight a corner before. I had to jump into a German advanced trench to escape being shot. The worst of it was that I had to get out of this when the Germans came along and I had to lie out in the cold  all day between the lines I was badly cramped, but when I got back the officers gave me a shot of brandy and plenty of grub. I never got such a do out before. The weather here is getting cold and I am afraid the war will last this winter and one after that by the looks of things. The major said he wouldn’t let me go out any more till I git a Distinguished Service Medal. It is only for the excitement of the thing I go out  because it is in my blood to find out what the Germans are doing, but I have codded them every time. Dear Mother, don’t think me foolhardy for doing it, I would get hit as quickly in our trenches or going along roads as I would between the lines if God willed it. Your loving son, P Kelly.

  

France 22 October 1915

Dear Mrs Kelly

Excuse this liberty that I take of writing to you, but your son is a great chum of mine, ands I will now give you an account of an adventure that he had a couple of days ago, and I think that he will get the VC over it, but it might cost him his life; he was very lucky to get back to us. It was a foggy morning and Peter along with Sergeants Gladding and Keenan, thought it would be a fine thing to go out and try and discover if the enemy had any working parties out. Foggy mornings are always great for reconnoitring purposes. I was on sentry go and we all watched them disappear beyond the fog.  A few minutes we heard a sharp succession of shots and we knew they had been discovered. We were all alert now, and we watched the direction where they had disappeared intently. Suddenly a figure was seen coming towards us through the mist, when he got nearer we saw that it was Sergt Keenan. Well, to make a long story short, Sergt Gladding and been shot through the neck, Lce Cpls Sullivan and Byrne went back with Sergt Keenan and helped Sgt Gladding in. The major was very sorry for this Sergt as he was a very capable NCO. The stretcher bearers were sent for and they carried him off to the dressing station. But what of Peter. There were all kinds of rumours as to what happened to him. Everything (even Sergeant Gladding’s wound) was of minor importance compared to his disappearance, as everyone here thinks a lot about Kelly. Some said that Sergeant Keenan saw him seized by four Germans as he disappeared into an advanced trench of theirs; but Sergeant Keenan (who I afterwards saw) said that Peter had jumped in the German trench just as Sergt Gladding got shot. Well, various were the speculations as to what became of him, and when the fog lifted we all; came to the conclusion that he had been captured at last. I got relieved soon afterwards, and went off to a dug-out for a sleep. I was wakened up by a comrade for my “cha” (tea). It was now 5 p.m. The tea was carried up from the ruined village, where our cooks were, by a fatigue party of the supports., and it was a tedious job getting along with the “dixies” through narrow communication trenches. Six o’clock arrives. It is now “Stand to2 and every man sees to his rifle and mans the parapet. Seven o’clock arrives. Out artillery sends over a few souvenirs to the Allemande (Germans). The Huns replied with 18 pounders and a rapid fire.

Suddenly a voice is heard. It is Peter’s, and everyone is delighted. He is going to the Major’s dig-out. He had just come in, and when he was half ways over the rapid fire started. He had to lie flat on his stomach and chance escaping being hit. He told me afterwards that when he jumped into the German trench a few minutes later a German came towards him without a rifle. Peter fired at him, got out of the trench, and had to lie all day in the long grass between the lines, shifting his position now and then to escape observation. But, you bet, we were all glad he got back. Yours truly, T Noone (sic) (Drogheda Independent, 27 November 1917)

 

KELLY, JAMES, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Balriggan, Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

KELLY, LUKE, Royal Navy, HMS Duke of Clarence. From North Road, Drogheda. Served on HMS ???, which was mined in October 1915.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLY, MATTHEW, Dublin Fusiliers. From Windmill Lane, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLY, Captain, P, S S Dotterl. From Drogheda

The Lord Mayor of Liverpool on Monday, presented cheques of 100 guineas awarded by the Liverpool and London War Risks Association to Capt E F Brennell and Capt P Kelly of the Cork Steamship Company’s vessels  Avicet and Dotterel, for their gallant conduct and skill in escaping from attacks of German aircraft near West Hinder lightship on October 30th and November 4th respectively. Mr Normal Hall said that in no instance recorded had greater gallantry been shown. Captain Kelly is a Drogheda man.

(Drogheda Independent, 5 February 1916)

 

KELLY, Private, P, East Lancashire Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported  wounded. (Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916)

 

KELLY, Private, P, Leinster Regiment. From Priest Land, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLY, PATRICK, East Lancashire Regiment. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLY, RAYMOND, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916) (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

KELLY, Driver, THOMAS, Royal Field Artillery. From Shamrock Lodge, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KELLY, TERENCE, Lancashire Fusiliers. From North Road, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KENNEDY, Private, C, Irish Guards. From Drogheda. Reported  wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 3 June 1916)

 

KENNY, Driver, J, 85 Battery, Royal Field Artillery. Son of J Kenny, Duleek.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KENNY,  PATRICK, from Annagassan.  (Listed in Dundalk Democrat, 16 October 1915, see Edward Bellingham)

 

KENNY, Drummer, WILLIAM,V.C.  2 Battalion Gordon Highlanders. From Green Hills, Drogheda.

            Drogheda Man gets VC

Among the distinctions gazetted last week was that of Drummer William Kenny, 2nd Gordon Highlanders, awarded the V.C. He is a native of Drogheda where his parents live. He is now in hospital at Newtown Abbot, Devon, having been invalided out with a broken wrist through a fall in the battlefield. In an interview he said: “There were men lying about wounded and I simply brought them in. The maxims had to be fetched and I did it. That’s all.

The “London Gazette” announces his distinction thus:  “Drummer Wm Kenny 6535 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders – For conspicuous bravery on October 23, near Ypres in rescuing men on five occasions under very heavy fire in the most fearless manner, and for twice previously saving machine guns by carrying the out of action. On numerous occasions Drummer Kenny conveyed urgent messages under very dangerous circumstances over fire-swept ground.”

(Dundalk Democrat 27 February, 1915)

 

… William Kenny’s father, who served 23 years in the 1st Battalion of the Gordons is still a hale man, while his mother is still hale and hearty. This worthy pair saw a good deal of military life together the old man’s regimental experiences lying amongst other places in Gibraltar, China, Egypt, and South Africa – Durban and Natal. Old Kenny during his service, secured five good-conduct clasps, and sports the Khedive Star and Medal on account of his Egyptian experiences. His son William who is one of thirteen children joined the colours some seventeen years ago, saw war service during the Boer war, from which he brought three medals. In consequence of the injuries sustained by William Kenny – a broken wrist, he has been unable himself to write to his parents and the only news that have received from him since he met with the accident which relegated him to hospital has been the occasional line from someone connected with the hospital.

The feeling amongst  young Kenny’s fellow-townsmen at the bravery he has shown and the distinction he has earned is one of very natural jubilation, and from every side congratulations are being poured in upon his worthy parents for the well deserved distinction which their heroic son’s gallantry has won for him. (Dundalk Democrat, 27 February 1915)

 

Drummer Kenny Home in Drogheda

A hero of the war

On last Wednesday Drummer Kenny, who has gained honours of distinction on the battlefield for deeds of bravery and daring do, and who has been awarded a Victoria Cross as a memento of same, returned to Drogheda for a short stay. He was wounded at the Front, and after spending some time in an n English hospital he has been sent home to recuperate in his native air. He arrived at Drogheda by the mid-day train, where he was met by his father and mother and other Drogheda citizens including the Mayor (Mr L J Elcock, J P), and Mr Walker, with whom he motored to his parental residence at Green Hills. Already he has been the recipient of many presentations for his courageous conduct, and during the coming week the people of Drogheda will show their appreciation and admiration of his bravery by making a presentation to him and presenting him with the freedom of the borough. His appearance in Drogheda was greeted with a hearty welcome, and his many friends and well-wishers will be glad to learn that he has d almost recovered from his wounds. The date of the presentation will be announced later. (Drogheda Independent, 13 March 1915)

 

Drummer Wm Kenny, V.C. of the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders, has been awarded the Order of the Third Class of St George of Russia.

(Drogheda Independent, 28 August 1915)

 

Son of Mr Kenny (of Tighe’s Bull Ring), 2nd Gordon Highlanders, obtained the VC for conspicuous bravery near Ypres on 23rd October 1914 rescuing wounded comrades and saving machine guns by carrying them out of action.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

           

Drum-Major Kenny, V C, of the Gordon Highlanders, who has been home again on ten days leave from France, has brought further distinction to his native town of Drogheda. In the recent fighting on the Somme his conspicuous gallantry brought him for the second time under the notice of his Commanding Officer, who has recommended a bar for the embellishment of his priceless medal. This is, in fact, the equivalent of another VC. Unhappily the C O has since been killed, and it is not yet certain whether the distinction recommended will be ultimately bestowed. The Drum-Major expects to be in the firing line once more at the beginning of next week. Good luck be with him.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 30 September 1916)

 

KERR, Corporal, T J H, Motorcycle Dispatch Rider, Royal Engineers. From St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

It is reported that Mr Kerr, late organist of St Nicholas’ Church who volunteered for service as a motor despatch rider at the same time as Mr Dowdall, is ‘missing’. There is no official confirmation, but ill news travels apace. Mr Kerr was a deserved popular man in Dundalk and a very talented and accomplished musician. (Dundalk Democrat, 11 November 1916)

           

We are glad to hear that Corporal T J H Kerr, of the Motor Despatch Corps (formerly organist of St Nicholas’ Church who was erroneously reported as ‘missing’ last November, is still safe and sound. In a letter to his father on last Saturday Corporal Kerr states that up to the present he has not had a scratch. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 October 1917)

 

KEENAN, L. From Camp Street, Dundalk.

 

KEVITT, F, 6 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Of the L & Y Co.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KIELY, JOSEPH, 2 Battalion, Leinster Regiment. From Magdalene Street, Drogheda. (Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KIERAN, ARTHUR PATRICK, 514889, Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force.  Born 12 October 1886, Dundalk, Co Louth. Religious affiliation Roman Catholic. Occupation Baker. Next-of-kin, Katherine Kieran, Dundalk. Co Louth, mother.  Attested on 14 March 1916, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

 

KIERAN, CANICE (KENNY), Motor Transport, Royal Army Service Corps. From 38 Castle Road, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KIERAN, Private, EDWARD, Royal Irish Rifles. From Mary Street North, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916).

 

KIERAN, Lance Corporal, EDWARD GERARD, Royal Army Service Corps. From 5 Mary Street North, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KIERAN, Private, JAMES, 8 Dragoon Guards. From Kilcurry, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1917)

 

KIERAN, W C, Royal Army Service Corps. From Castle Road, Dundalk.

Mr W C Kieran, A.S.C., son of Mr William Kieran, Castle Road, who has been serving at the front for many months past, is lying wounded in a military hospital near London. We are glad to learn he is getting on well. He was hit while bringing up ammunition to the firing line. Mr Kieran enlisted like so many other high-spirited young townsmen shortly after the outbreak of war and had already done good service. (Dundalk Democrat, 25 September 1915)

 

KIERANS, PATRICK, Leinster Regiment. From Greenhills, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KIERANS, Private, PETER, Leinster Regiment. From Green Lanes, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KINAHAN, P J. From Parnell Park, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KINAHAN ( X 2). In the Army.  From Dromiskin, Dundalk.

At Castlebellingham Petty sessions on Thursday – before Dr P J O’Hagan, J P (chairman) and Messrs P Byrne, E J Caraher, and P McGee, J Ps – a respectable-looking young girl named Anne Kinahan of Dromiskin, was charged at the suit of the Crown, with (1) knowing that one Wm Brown, a soldier, was about to desert, assisted him to desert by supplying him with civilian attire, and with (2) receiving from Brown a military uniform frock and cap.

D.I. Norris prosecuted, and the defendant was not professionally represented.

D.I. Norris said on the first charge of aiding a soldier to desert, the penalty set down under the Army Act was imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months. There was no provision for a fine. For taking a military uniform a fine not exceeding £20 could be imposed. When an army uniform was got in the possession of any person the authorities would have to be satisfied that the person came by it lawfully.

Constable Thompson deposed that the defendant had made a statement to him that on the 31st August a soldier in uniform came to her place and said that a woman (who she did not know) had sent him there to get old clothes. She gave him an old coat and cap and he left the frock and military cap wither. The man then left and went to a public house. That was all she knew about it. He paid her no money for the clothes and she did not think she was doing any harm. Continuing, the constable stated that he got the old civilian clothes (produced) from a deserter from the 8th Battalion of R.I.F. who had been handed over to a military escort. He had got the military clothes in the defendant’s house.

Accused pleaded guilty.

D I Norris said the offence was a very serious one. He would point out  however , that the girl had two brothers serving in the Army. The Chairman said the magistrates had taken into account the fact that the defendant had two brothers in the Army and they would let her off under the Probation Acton her own bail of £5 and her father’s bail of a similar amount. (Dundalk Democrat, 30 October 1915)

 

KING, D, 9 Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. From Wellington Place, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KING, Private, M, Irish Guards. From Oldbridge, Drogheda.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KING, VINCENT, Royal Irish Fusiliers. From Dunleer district. ‘In training’.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

KINLON, Private, M, Royal Irish Rifles. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 27 May, 1916, also Drogheda Independent, 3 June 1916).

 

KINSELLA, PATRICK.

            Dunleer Petty Sessions.

When the business of the Court had concluded, Mr Mathews, J P, said he wished to congratulate Constable Patk Kinsella who had volunteered for active service. They appreciated his pluck, they tendered him their sincere wishes for his safe return with promotion and the honours of war. He had known Constable Kinsella for some time and knew him to be an excellent constable. Mr M’Gee, J P,; Mr Dromgoole (Clerk), and Sergeant Callan also desired to be associated with what Mr Mathews had said. Constable Kinsella made an appropriate reply. He left Dunleer later in the day. (Dundalk Democrat, 16 January 1915)

 

Constable Patrick Kinsella, joined the Irish Guards from Dunleer; was complimented by the magistrates at Petty Sessions, and was the recipient of a presentation from the local residents. Regarded as an efficient and popular officer. Has two brothers at the front, one being a prisoner at Hamelin.

(Drogheda Advertiser, 15 January 1916)

 

KIRK, Private, E S. From Broughton Street, Dundalk.

Private E S Kirk, of Broughton Street in a letter to his mother says: ‘I was speaking to Capt. Carroll of Dundalk just before he went home. He is always on the look-out for any Dundalk boys. We had a talk over the old days when I was at the Christian Schools. I came across Paddy Kearney out here, and shouted  with joy when I clapped my eyes on him. He was asking for all in Dundalk. J O’Hare was asking for the boys also. This is interesting as shewing how Dundalk men feel the bond that the old town makes between all her ‘boys’ – especially when away from her. Pvte Kirk comes from a fighting family. His Uncle, Sam Duffy, is in the trenches somewhere. When he was last home he had a prayer –book in which a German bullet had imbedded itself. But for that it would have made a hole through him large enough to let life out. (Dundalk Democrat, 23 June 1917)

 

KIRK, JAMES JOSEPH, 20 Battalion, D Company,  Australian Imperial Force. Born in Dundalk, Co Louth. Age twenty-four years and one month.  Roman Catholic.  Occupation Steam Fitter. Previously apprenticed with the Great Northern Railway, Dundalk, for three years and six months.  Next-of-kin Mr James Kirk, Dundalk, father. Enlisted 11 October  1915. Went absent without leave  8 December 1915 for 11 Days.  Fined five shillings.  Charged at Liverpool, Australia, with desertion  on 9 January 1916. Sentenced by General Court Martial on  24 March 1916 to 150 days Hard Labour and discharged from the army.

 

KIRK, Private, O, Royal Irish Rifles. From Castletown, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

 

KIRWAN, Private, P. Leinster Regiment. From Drogheda. Reported wounded.

(Dundalk Democrat, 21 October 1916)

 

KNAGGS, Captain, 4 Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers. From Corderry, Louth. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Lieutenant Victor St. George Knaggs, Royal Field Artillery, only son of Captain and Mrs Knaggs of Corderry, was killed in action on 12 August 1918. (DH)

 

KNIGHT, Quarter-Master Sergeant, J H, 5 Battalion, Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KNIGHT, Drummer, 5 Battalion Leinster Regiment.

(Roll of Honour, Drogheda Advertiser, 15 April 1916)

 

KNOX, Lieutanant, ALEX EDMUND, Royal Engineers, 1st Sappers and Miners IARD (McDonnell, St Peter’s C of I, JODS 2000)

 

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20 March 2015

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